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This is my definition Matt.

It is, while controlling your drift, letting the current take you bait down stream as you use your rod and let out line to keep it "bouncing" along the bottom. This method is great for heavy current. On the Ohio, the current is generally too slow. You can do something similar by slowing the drift with a trolling motor as you lift and drop your bait along the bottom. More like walking the bait. In either case, it is essential that you keep the line tight so you can feel the sinker when it taps the bottom.
 

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I agree. Why can you advertise a commercial builder and not the little guy. It's not fair!
I am not sure you can not comment on a rod builders product. If you want to know for sure, ask Jim or just post the question on the Administrator鈥檚 thread. They are good people and will answer your questions.

Being a past Admin, I know the site did not want manufacturers advertising for free on the site that makes money by selling advertising.

When you read that something is forbidden, especially when the post is old, take it with a grain of salt. Look thru the site rules and if still unsure, ask Admin.

tight lines
 

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I have two bumping rods. The Rippin Lipps bumping rod, The Stalker is a good rod at 7鈥3鈥 in length. I have the Abu Garcia Revo Toro on it

And then I have an Abu Garcia, Vendetta that is 7鈥6鈥 in length. It is heavy power, fast action. I have the Fathom on it.

I have the two because I got great prices on the reels and wanted to try both a right and left handed version.

I have found that both the right and left hand reels work equally well. It all depends on what you get used to. A short time with either reel and it will feel natural.

Now the Stalker rod is $129 from Rippin Lips and the Heavy fast action Vendetta is around $90 at Cabellas.

Although these two rods are actually only 2 or 3 inches different in length, because of reel placement the handle is quite different. When back bouncing you will end up placing the rod handle under your forearm to get some leverage. You will spend the day with it there, lifting and dropping the rod tip to walk the bait in the current. See the photos below.

When bouncing, feel is what it is all about. That is why a stiff carbon fiber rod is a good choice. That is not to say that a fiberglass rod won鈥檛 work but you lose a slight bit of sensitivity with fiberglass. Braid gives you better feel also. I make my own sinkers but most seem to like the cannonball (round) sinker. It supposedly gives the best feel when it hits bottom.

You want the boat drifting backward at about half the speed of the current. Since most bites occurs when the bait is falling, you should let line out when you are lifting the rod. If you let it out when the bait is falling, you lose the feel you need.

A bite can be anywhere from a tap or bump to a hard hit. There is nothing quite like getting a hard hit while you are holding the rod.

If while back bouncing, you lose the feel of the sinker hitting bottom, reel line in until you get the feel back. If you lose the feel, the line can get a bow in it cause by the current and be dragging your rig along the bottom. Best way in the world to get snagged.

good luck

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tight lines
 

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Rippin Lipps was bought out a couple years ago. The new owner/s took some time to make some changes to the rod design so were off line for a while.

That Ugly Stik Tiger should be good. Give it a try.
 
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