Bear kodak Magnum

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by chris45601, Nov 30, 2006.

  1. chris45601

    chris45601 New Member

    Messages:
    357
    State:
    ohio
    Well brothers, I have problem im from ohio avid bow hunt but haven't been able to do it for a couple of years because of me being in the navy and lack of bow, My grandfather just gave me a Bear kodak Magnum, and from my understanding it's hard to impposible to get parts for, Anybody know of any place i could get parts for this almost out of the box new bow condition bow?
     
  2. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    What kind of parts do you need? There are a lot of places to get parts. A search for Bear archery will get you dozens of dealers.
     

  3. chris45601

    chris45601 New Member

    Messages:
    357
    State:
    ohio
    Stabalizer, new optics, (not a big deal) string and peep sights i think that's about it
     
  4. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Stabilizers are all standard (short ones for hunting, long ones for target shooting) and any bow shop will make a string for your bow. Sight brackets are pretty much adjustable and a lot of them will fit any compound bow. If you are going to hunt with the bow, the biggest thing to worry about with sights is how strong they are. Some sights are great for the range but they are so fragile that there is a chance they will get out of position or damaged in a hunting situation. Look for sights that are strong and have pins or cross hairs that are protected. In my opinion, the most important thing to get right in a hunting bow is noise. Make sure it is set up right (so the arrow doesn't wobble leaving the rest) and has good string silencers. Lubricate all moving parts with heavy mineral oil or some other oder free lubricant and keep the string waxed. I go for simplicity. The more gizmos & Jim cracks you have , the more chance there is for something to go wrong.
     
  5. gilmafam

    gilmafam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,466
    State:
    California
    Willie,

    A question for you. I have not strung my 65lbKodiak recure bow for over 30 yrs now. In fact I haven't looked at it in some time as well. (locked up with all my other weapons) As I recall, the fiberglass looks as it has stress cracks on it. I have grown up to know not to pull back a bow and let er go without an arrow in it. It sure takes and effort to push/pull to do the stringing. I dont go through the leg to do it as the limbs may get stressed. What are the chances that it will shatter If I were to let an arrow go? I use to be able to shoot here in town, years ago..God how time have changed.

    What you say?

    Bayrunner ray.... "Bare Bow"
     
  6. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Ray, unless those cracks are deep enough to get your fingernail in then I suspect that they are just in the backing material and really not a problem. Three of my bows are the old glass laminated type and have hairline cracks in them. However, it doesn't affect the bow. You can also fill them in with a good clear epoxy. Just rub some on the limbs to fill the cracks and wipe off the excess before it dries. I know a bow stringer is best but I've been using the step thru method since I started. Just be careful that the string is in the right place and doesn't slip out of the groove before relaxing your grip on the bow. This could result in a twisted limb. (limbs can be straitened if they are not extremely bad). Keep the tip off the ground and behind your ankle. If your string is 30 years old and hasn't been waxed, I'd get a new string before cocking the bow. I'd be more worried about the string breaking which can be worse then a dry fire situation. Finally, if you ever decide to get rid of that Kodiak, it could have a good home with a loving family here in Virginia! LOL
     
  7. craigr

    craigr New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Nebraska
    I also have a Kodiak Magnum that is in next to new condition. I used to shoot it ALOT out in the yard & at UNO Archery club. I never did hunt with it.

    Due to an injury, I have been unable to pull it back for 15 years. It is still strung and in its case.

    Could having it strung for all of these years, have caused it damage?

    I have thought about taking it in to have it un-strung, but haven't gotten around to it.

    I had hoped that one of my 2 boys would've gotten into it, but it doesn't look like it. But I doubt I should leave it strung.

    craigr
     
  8. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Craig, you should never leave a stick bow strung for long periods of time as it will assume that shape, which affects the weight/strength of the bow as well as causing limb twist and tiller problems. I suggest you un-string it ASAP!
     
  9. gilmafam

    gilmafam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,466
    State:
    California
    Thanks for the input regarding my bow(s) I'll check into a new string. I hear "loud and clear". You know, my dad and I use to make all our own shafts.. even went as far as to barrel the shafts. We even made our own spline testing contraption. My dad couldn't shoot as well as I could. He had a problem trying to figure out which way to pull the bow... left or right. I made a "shot gun" arrow.... back then.... My "flu-fly arrow would slow the speed, and then the bee-bees would come out. I wrapped the fletch around the shaft for my "shooting in the air" flu-flu.

    we'll keep you in mind... ifin I want to get rid of the bow... My son believes eating meat is "murder".... you know what I mean... I don't mind! I grew up with a dad from the old west of Arizona, where his dad was a Sheriff, jewler and ran off with a "salloon gal". Where I live, they use to allow many things. Now it seems un-american that we cant do some things here locally....

    talk to you... later on,

    bayrunner ray
     
  10. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Yea, I feel for ya. I didn't climb to the top of the food chain to revert back to grazing. There's a place for all Gods furry creatures.....right next to my mashed potatoes! LOL
     
  11. craigr

    craigr New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Nebraska
    It looks like I was commenting on the wrong bow.

    I just did a search on ebay to find out what my bow is worth and found only recurves. - Mine is a compound kodiak magnum.

    Maybe I have the name wrong, but I don't think so....

    I'll have to check.

    Sorry for my confusion,

    craigr
     
  12. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    You have the right bow, Craig. When Bear started making compound bows they used the same names that they were using for their recurves. I have a few Bear Grizzly recurves but I also have a bear Grizzly compound. The same is true with the Kodiak model. Your Kodiak compound is very similar to my Grizzly compound.
     
  13. gilmafam

    gilmafam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,466
    State:
    California
    Flathead willie, thanks for all your help... Looked in my old quiver and found an "ole string"... not that I'm going to use it to shoot with, but I'm sending off for new ones soon.
    "Isn't the way that it goes" what you use to do all the time is hard to get back to where you left off. I can barely handle a long draw with my 45 # Bear Kodiak Recurve 60" model... fat chance I'd be able to pull a full draw on the Magnum recurve 65# 52".
    I'll have to work on the upper body strength..... just joined a 24hr gym to get the new knees in shape. I use to string the bows by the push pull way of one tang at the right foot, and then pulling and pushing out to slide the string up... Thats hard to do now with the 45. couldn't imagine doing that with the 65... I may have to do the step through method... I hate to stress the limbs that way.

    Happy New Year Willie

    bayrunner ray
     
  14. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Happy New Year to you also, Ray. As for the stringing, I've always used the step through method for the last 31 years. It doesn't stress the limbs as much as shooting does, however, be very careful that the string remains in the grooves as you relax the bow. If it slips out you can twist a limb very easily. The best thing is to get a bow stringer. If you are not familiar with those; it's just a long string with a leather cup on each end. You put the cups over the ends of the limbs, step on the string, and pull up on the bow. Then just slip the string in place and relax the bow. It's very easy on you and the bow.
    I'm envious of your 65# Kodiak. All my bows came to me used and I've always wanted a 60# or 65#. Just haven't been lucky enough to find one yet. My compounds are 70# and they will really sling an arrow out there! I haven't shot them much lately. I prefer the recurves. I've been looking for a kid that is serious about archery to give my compounds to.
     
  15. Tuttlecat

    Tuttlecat Active Member

    Messages:
    1,278
    State:
    Wamego, Kansas,
    A stringer would be a great choice to get your string on/off of those vintage 'curves.
     
  16. peck

    peck New Member

    Messages:
    17
    State:
    Illinois
    I have an old Alaska bear recuve that i still use. Ishoot it like the indians did and do just fine. Haven't killed anything big but I'm just a meat guy.