BBQ and Campstove for a Pontoon Boat

Discussion in 'Catfishing Library' started by Whistler, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    Originally submitted on October 3, 2002

    My Campstove and BBQ


    When I first bought my pontoon boat, one of the options was a rail mount barbecue that cost $149.00. I looked at that thing and decided I could make my own a lot cheaper. The floor mount, pole and two table mounts cost me a total of $7.49 from a mail order RV parts store. These are called dinette table mounts. The same thing in a boat catalog costs about $45.00, if you can find a table mount. Most table mounts for boats are formed to the table. The barbecue cost me $14.00 at Wal-Mart. This particular Coleman stove cost me $7.00 at the local flea market/swap meet. I also bought stainless steel hardware for about $6.00. I had to touch up the paint on the campstove, but otherwise it works fine. I haven’t used the stove yet, but now that I’ve decided to do some winter fishing, I think it will come in handy. The barbecue has obviously seen a lot of use, I’ve had it on the boat for 3 years. I will probably replace it before long. The barbecue will make a pot of coffee, but it takes forever to boil, that’s what originally made me decide to add the campstove. I drilled a hole in the deck with a hole saw and installed the floor mount with stainless steel screws. For the table mounts I used 1" stainless screws and nuts. I set the mount on and drilled two holes directly across from each other, installed them, then drilled the rest. I think the floor mount and barbecue took about 60 minutes for the whole job. The campstove took about half that time. I made sure to mount the whole thing on the opposite end of the boat from the gas tank. I use some foil or newspaper to catch grease from the barbecue on the deck. I didn’t show it, but I have a small strip of wire mesh that I will tie strap between the campstove wind guards to keep pans or coffee pots in place. You never know when someone is going to go by at supersonic speeds. The entire cost was approximately $35.00 and maybe an hour and a half of my time. I can replace a barbecue every three years and still not cost as much as the dealer’s barbecue for many years. This idea would probably work on any boat, but is probably most feasible on a pontoon boat. This turned out to be a very cheap and useful project. One reminder: when you use the Coleman fuel on the boat, be very careful with it. I try to fill the tanks on my lanterns before I leave my driveway and will do the same for the campstove. If I do have to fill them on the boat, I do it away from where I intend to use them and never while the outboard is running. I also keep the propane bottles in the underseat compartments until I intend to use them. Always think SAFETY!

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