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Southeast mo Mississippi river
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ready to get 3 bank charger I have 2 grope 31 700 amp and a start battery
I may fish 2 to 4 days in a row then boat may set 7 to 14 days
A 5 amp is less than half the cost of 10amp same brand
Any thoughts on how long charge times?
 

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Ready to get 3 bank charger I have 2 grope 31 700 amp and a start batteryA 5 amp is less than half the cost of 10amp same brand
Any thoughts on how long charge times?
Smart to ask before you buy.
I never understand those posts that say “I just bought xxxxxx, what are folks’s opinions on them?”

When you say 10 amps, are you talking 10 per bank or 10 total?
Chargers usually split the available amps between the batteries based on which one needs most. If total, 10 amps is only 3 amps each which is not a lot although you may find, as I do, that your cranking battery is kept up by the charging system on the motor.

…W
 

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Southeast mo Mississippi river
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The third battery will run electronics the the motor is used in current it can get a workout. I want something that I can plug in after a hard day and be ready early next morning
 

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With what you are looking for, I would think the 10 amp per bank is best. As far as chargers go, the 10 amp is still considered a slow charge. Slow charge is better for the batteries and less likely to over charge a battery.

You can hook that three bank charger with one bank lead going to each battery for pos and neg. then when you get home just plug it in. you do not need to disconnect your two 12 volt batteries that power your 24 volt trolling motor.

When fishing multiple days in a row, it is important to get the charger plugged in as soon as you can at the end of the day.

Like mentioned earlier, since the starter battery is being charged when the motor is running it should not need as much of a charge as the trolling motor batteries.

Good luck with your choice D.
 

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I fish like that also hit it hard two or three days in a row then a 4 or 5 day break. I ran a Dual Pro 10 amp per bank charger for years with no issues. It finally lost a bank. I switched to the Minn Kota 3 bank 10 amp per bank charger about a year ago. Still no issues. The size of the charger goes up between the 10 amp per bank and the 15 amp as does the cost. I find the 10 does everything I need. Good luck..
 

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Boy this lost me! My charger, new one I just got, has a light come on when the battery is charged! No clue what difference the amps make's.
 

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Don, the amperage a charger is listed at is the amount of amps it puts back into the battery being charged. A 5 amp charger puts 5 amps back into a battery per hour until the battery is fully charged. A 10 amp charger will theoretically charge the same battery twice as fast. If you don't go fishing several days in a row, a smaller charger like a 3 or 5 amp charger will do fine. It will have the time to completely recharge the batteries. But if you fish several days in a row, a 5 amp charger might not be able to completely recharge a battery fast enough so a 10 amp charger is a better choice. Chargers are also rated as being a slow charger if less than a 10 amp charger. You can get a 20, 30 or even 50 amp charger which are much faster but the price is also a lot higher. And the high amp chargers can over charge a battery so the slow chargers (10 amp or less) are considered safer for your batteries.

All chargers that I know of have a light that comes on (usually green) when the battery is charger. But a 10 amp charger will say "Let's go fishing" quicker than a 5 amp charger.

It is all a choice on what you need and how much you are willing to spend.
 

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Do you guys leave the charger on your batteries all winter?
Will it make them boil over?
 

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2C, gt is right on in saying it totally depends on the charger you have. A smart charger will check the level of charge every so often and charge if needed. Then shut off when the battery is charged. Those are made to be left hooked up for an extended period. But as I mentioned above, you can also charge your batteries over night, once a month during the winter and be ok also. That have a smart charger on my 2 trolling motor batteries and a very small battery tender on my starting battery. I set a monthly alert on my computers/iphone and plug them in over night, once a month.

Both ways will do what is needed to maintain your batteries in good condition. Just make sure you are not drawing any power out of them while they are in storage. Maybe even disconnect the positive terminal if not sure.

tight lines.
 

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I agree, I have a three bank "smart charger" on my boat which I leave plugged in all winter. If it does what they claim it does it monitors the charge in each battery (3) and if any one of the three needs charged it charges only that battery and quits charging it when full charge is reached. It is plugged in whenever the boat is not on the water. Three years so far with no problems.
On the other hand I have an older 10 amp. standard battery charger mainly used for charging batteries that have ran down due to draw, it would boil a battery dry if left on all winter.
 
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