Base plating, is it necessary?

Discussion in 'Trapping & Fur Taking' started by field989, Jun 19, 2006.

  1. field989

    field989 New Member

    Messages:
    896
    State:
    east central indiana
    i am planning on trapping coon, and maybe try some fox,(but mostly coon)
    is base plating necessary, or a good idea to do, also what advantages does it provide if you do base plate traps,

    also would u rather use conibear style traps or foot holds, for coon


    also i am going to have to ask around for some land to trap at, what are some good things to say to people that own woods, to get permission to trap
    because i have no expirence in this lol


    thanks...- Jeff
     
  2. field989

    field989 New Member

    Messages:
    896
    State:
    east central indiana
    also, what do you trappers do with the meat that you get from the animals you trap.
    i wont be trapping heavily, but probably just for muskrat,coon, and maybe some fox, but muskrat and coon will be the main ones, and im going to get some offset jaw traps and see if i can get some with padded jaws, but i will be trying to use mainly body grip traps and some foot holds
     

  3. shortbus

    shortbus New Member

    Messages:
    459
    State:
    indiana
    Baseplating is well worth it on any trap. If your using 1.5 coils for coon and fox, then plate them with 1/4" round stock. They are easy to make. If your traps aren't fastened by the chain in the center of the trap the animal pulls the trap at an angle. This causes the foot to slide in the jaws toward the spring lever and causes cutting. When the foot slides over the coon has a better chance of getting loose. I've had big coons bend a 1.5 into a "V",,, they still held the coon but was about to come apart. a coyote will leave a regular 1.5 in a pile of parts. Baseplate your traps, put three inline swivles on the chain and keep the chains about 16"to18" long and you will have way better traps that will hold animals better. It also makes them easier to bed in the ground.
    For me I like footholds for coons over conibears. You can use a 160 on land I believe but a 220 has to be half submerged in water by state law. Check and see for yourself, I can't remember exactly what the laws are. A 160 i think is to small for a coon.

    Getting permission to trap is one of the hardest parts. Just remember that you will be turned down by some so don't get your hopes up about certain areas. I've found that the oldtime farmboys have no problem at all with trapping on the properties. If there is a small creek on the property I ask if they mind if I trap a few muskrats from it. If they say "have at it" then I ask if they have any coons around. The main thing is to respect them and the land they own. I got permission to trap 400 acres along a creek because I helped a farmer put a new belt on his combine. I never even asked to trap his land, I just told him I like to trap coyotes.
     
  4. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    I use a number 11 long spring for coons. I run downers on most all of them. I just started drowning last year after being show how to set one up by Gooboy. I use to staple them to the tree I set by. I watch a video and converted to setting mine like they do. I use a Brookshire disposable stake and #14 slide wire. I tie the slide wire off to a stake on the bank under water with the chain stretched out to the set. Then I take the disposable stake, use my home made driver, and push it in the ground with the slide wire tight. I learned the hard way that you have to have the slide wire tight. I also found out that you do not have to get the animal under water, just his foot. If you can get him in deep water that is a plus, but not necessary.

    I love coni bear tarps for coon also. I only have 280’s right now, but with the profit from this coming up season I plan to purchase some 220’s. I caught 2 40+lbs beaver in some of Gooboy’s 220’s this past season. I like the fact that they are dispatched when you get there. In Louisiana you can set them on dry land also.

    I use my 280’s for beaver, otter, and coon. They work great for all of them. I have not found a beaver that want go in them yet, and I have not missed and otter yet either. They work wonders on the coons also. I use strictly Victor in the 280’s. You pay more, but you get a better trap that will last for years to come.

    On fox I will use a 1 ½ coil in dirt hole sets. On cat, I use a #2 Wolfer made by BMI. It is the only BMI trap I like and they have held up good so far. I have used them for 10+ years. They come with a bottom center chain, off set jaws, a night latch trigger, and 4 coils. I have not lost but one cat so far, and he had to much slack in the chain and fell over a limb on the tree and pulled out. I add 4-5’ of chain to all my cat traps. I use home made rebar stakes about 16” long. A cat will jump straight up in the air and will pull the stake out of the ground with a short chain. Fox and coyotes pull side ways. I have lost one trap due to having a short chain. I never made another cat set with a short chain again. LOL.

    When trying to gain access to property, remember this, you are going to do something free for the land owner. Never make out that they are helping you by letting you on there place, but rather you will remove pets from their place and help them out. Don’t asked to trap, ask if they have any animal problems. I have been told NO! Don’t set foot on my place. I have been told you can remove all the beaver you want and that is it. Well, that is when you have to explain that the beaver are worth nothing and you need to remove the coons also to make it worth your while. But, you need to be able to remove the beaver and lots of them when doing this. Last year Eric and I set on one pond. We could trap everything there, as long as we took the beaver out also. We removed 38 beaver and 28 nutria rats in 10 nights. The land owner could care less about the 30 something coons and 12 otter we took. He asked us to come back next season also.

    I hope this helps.
     
  5. sds888

    sds888 New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Townville, South Carolina
    I couldnt agree with cuttingout any more the landowner is the one with the problem an you are there to help. I make my side or "play" money this way. People will pay me to come trap. However I have been leaving money out there by not putting up my furs but I think I am going to start as soon as I get the supplies. Oh and in this state if a furbearer is doing damage to a property within 100 yards of the house you can trap it year around as long as your the homewner or a nuisance wildlife control operator. ie a trapper that gets paid to trap. You can also take beaver year around on private land as long as your the home owner or NWCO. Hope this helps
    Stephen
     
  6. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    These guys have already given you some good info. Pick-up a copy of the Trapping Regulations & read them over a few times before season, this way you can ask questions, or contact a CO for an answer ahead of time.

    Baseplating wouldn't be required for coon, but as Shortbus mentioned, centerswiveling is an advantage. I also make 1/4" roundstock centerswivel laminations for this. (shown on right in pic) http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/Trapping%20Supplies/IM001546.jpg

    Baseplating strengthens the frame of the trap, preventing it from bowing & warping, and allowing the jaws to pop-out. On my coyote traps, I also add a bubble of weld on the jawtips (outside of the frame) to help prevent the jaws from being pulled-out. Jaw laminations also help avoid this. This pic shows a baseplated trap, and if you look at the jawtips, you'll see the "bubbles" of weld I did as well.
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/Trap%20Work/IM001656.jpg

    Jaw laminations
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/Trap%20Work/IM001655.jpg

    Adding good swivels to your trapchain will be one of the best things you can do, and they are relatively inexpensive (.50 each).


    I'm a foothold trapper pretty much myself, but it's just by preference. Bodygrips work extremely well in trail & blind sets, and are quicker to set & require less set maintenance (freezing dirt ofer a foothold for example). Bucket sets are another set some swear by, but I haven't tried them enough to form a solid opinion of them.
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/traps/bktset1.jpg
    Again, care & caution needs to be used in where these are set, since trappers seem to be responsible for irresponsible pet owners disregard for leash laws.

    1.5 coil or longsprings, #11 longs, #1 coils are all good coon traps. Anything much larger than a 1.5 allows excess room under the jaws for a coon to chew it's foot, unless the set is a drowning set. If you can find some #2 Victor squarejaw coilspring traps, you can usually get them pretty cheap, because they were somewhat poorly built, but make excellent rat & mink traps when used on drowners, simply because of their size & weight, as it assists & hastens in drowning a catch.

    In Indana, 220's are legal to set on land, as long as the jaw spread doesn't exceed 7.5". I recently asked a couple CO's if this was an inside or outside jaw measurement (as it isn't specified in the reg's)....and got 2 different answers. So if in doubt, don't set it. 330's must be completely submerged in water. So use care when setting in ditches, as the water-level can fluctuate rapidly...what is under-water today, may not be tomorrow.....and if a CO happens upon your 330 "tomorrow".....you're liable to be cited for an illegal set.

    As far as permission, as mentioned, farmers are more than aware of the damage these animals do to crops & property. If you can "get in" with a farmer or two, word-of-mouth will be your best tool, as most local farmers know one-another. Also, as mentioned, RESPECT of their property can;t be overly stressed. It'll be to your advantage to gain some information of the animals you intend to trap, how to make sets that avoid farmers pets, and of the regulations as well.....it's good to have the answers for the questions the landowner may ask you. Again, knowlege is your best tool. You can easily print yourself some business-type cards on your computer with your contact information on them. I make it a point to add the words "Responsible & Humane" in the mix. Just don't word them so it appears you are in the Animal Damage Control bussiness (which requires a permit, and the ADC Agent charges a fee for removal of nuisence animals). I had 3 "new" farmers contact me last season wanting me to trap their properties once they heard I was trapping coyote for someone else.

    As far as the carcasses, whatever you do please DON'T dump them out on a deserted country road! (not saying that you would) Some farmers have disposal spots for dead farm animals & may let you dump carcasses their. I have a guy who works at a local gas station I give my coons to. I give my rat carcasses to a guy that feeds them to his coyotes, and the rest pretty much go into the dumpster.

    For the animals you mentioned, you won't want to use offset traps. Also, if it's like here (Madison Co.) you may have to trap abunch of coyote before getting to the fox, as a high coyte population tends to produce a lower fox population hanging-around.

    Trapstakes- Alot of trappers use rebar. Depending on the target, you may get by with 1 stake, or you can use a double stake end that allows 2 rebar stakes to be driven-in at an angle, like an "X". This helps eliminate stake pumping/jacking.

    I run mostly Berkshire cablestakes. I buy the ends, and a spool of 3/32" cable & assemble them myself, to whatever length I need. These are attatched to the trapchain (I use splitrings), and are driven into the ground with a driver. Once driven-in, they are not easily removed. I had to make a puller to remove them. They'll hold as well as rebar, and are much lighter in weight to carry. However, in extremely rocky soil, they can be difficult to drive, but because the flat in (which is underground) flips horizontal, they are more difficult when an animal is working against the trap.

    Berkshire Cablestake
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/traps/cabstk8.jpg

    Driver (1 with T-handle & 1-without)
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/Trapping%20Supplies/Stakedriver.jpg


    Puller
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/traps/SP-side.jpg


    Smitty
     
  7. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    Good post smitty and 888.
     
  8. da-cajun-angla

    da-cajun-angla New Member

    Messages:
    221
    State:
    louisiana
    U Can Find A Lot Of Useful Info On The Subject...just Takes A Lil Lookin Around...theres Some Pretty "mean" Ways Of Trapping Coons That I've Tried...my Grandpa Taught Me A Thing Or 2...
     
  9. field989

    field989 New Member

    Messages:
    896
    State:
    east central indiana
    thanks everyone for the info, i will definately keep all of it in mind this trapping season
     
  10. field989

    field989 New Member

    Messages:
    896
    State:
    east central indiana
    one more question, when i go to buy my trapping supplies, i know i will need dye and wax, and i am planning on getting 3 or 4 victor 1 1/2 coilspring leg holds, and 4 110 conibears, i am going to get some crush proof swivels, and some straight link machine chain, and a s-hook and rivet tool,and a dirt sifter, and some gloves, oh and a pack basket of something along that range, then a fleshing beam and a fleshing knife, and a trowel

    anything else i should get should this cover my trapping needs this winter, for coon and maybe fox, and muskrat


    also i am going to try to get all of this stuff made in the usa
     
  11. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    On traps I use in the water, I Speed-Dip them. I don't Speed-Dip land traps, but there's alot of trappers who do. It's quicker than boiling dye & waxing.

    Any new trap needs to be degreased (to remove factory oil), and given a light coat of rust, which helps the dye adhere. I'm going to paste a fellow trappers post, because it's quicker than my explaining it, the pics however may not work....but you'll get the idea:
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    Trap preparation for new traps:

    First take the traps inside run them through the dishwasher with the same amount of dishwasher soap you use for really dirty dishes be sure to keep the chains up out of any moving parts...
    [​IMG]

    Then dip them in a mixture of 8oz. white vinegar to 1 1/2 gal. water...
    [​IMG]

    lay them out in the grass and 7 hours later they have a light coat of rust ready to be dyed...
    [​IMG]
    dye them in logwood trap dye wax them and ready for the trap line...
    [​IMG]

    I dye them a dozen at a time by boiling them in logwood dye over a turkey fryer burner. I use one 1lb. bag of dye to 3 1/2-4 gal. of water this will do 4-5 dozen traps before you'd want to add another bag of dye. Boil them about 10-15min. on a medium boil. Then hang them to dry. I heat the wax in a large stockpot it takes only enough wax to cover each trap. Heat it til it is completely melted and starting to smoke (turn the burner down so it doesn't burst into flames and keep the lid handy if it did), on the same burner. Be sure the traps are completely dry or the wax will boil violently! then I dip each trap in the wax one at a time.(I use a stiff piece of #9 wire with a hook on the end to dip the traps in the wax.) I leave it in the wax until the "sizzling" stops (about 30 sec. - 1 min., the trap needs to be heated to the same temp. as the wax for it to coat correctly not too thick) Then I pull the trap out, shake off the excess wax and hang it to dry. As soon as it is cool it can be set.
    BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL WHEN USING THE WAX IT IS FLAMMABLE IF YOU ARE A MINOR GET AN ADULT TO SUPERVISE!!!

    The dye and wax is available through most any trapping supply places.

    For used traps take them to the car wash and power wash off all the dirt and loose rust then skip the dishwasher and vinegar.


    By ADC
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    If you have a walnut tree close, you can throw them in for dye, as opposed to buying a commercial dye (and walnuts are free), such as logwood. I used it last season, and am going back to the walnuts this year.

    The pasted post above will also give you some idea of what you will need in the way of trap treatment materials.

    For S-hook & rivet tool....just buy a cheap set of fence pliers. You can make a cheap sifter out of some 1"X4" (just make a frame about 9"X12") and staple some 1/4" hardware cloth to the bottom of it.

    I made a cheap packbasket out of a clothes hamper & a couple leftover pieces of 2" ratchet straps (for my buddy to carry the catches in :big_smile: )
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/Trapping%20Pics/PB1.jpg

    A fleshing beam you can also make from a 2"X6", if you have a few basic woodworking tools, or maybe if you're taking a shop class? Or have a friend who is that needs a project. You'll need some stretchers too and a good skinning knife or 2 & a way to sharpen them. I recomended a book to another trapper here, the book is called "Fur Handling 2000" by Hal Sullivan. It's under $15 and if you make some of the things I mentioned above (instead of buying them) you'll still be money ahead after buying the book, and it will help you greatly in learning how to skin & put-up your furs.

    I use coffee filters or waxpaper for pancovers, if you use waxpaper, just be sure to wad it up a few times to take the wrinkling sound out of it.

    When it gets below freezing, and we have warm days & below freezing nights, you'll need a way to prevent your sets from freezing. There are alot of different ways to do this, and if you'll remind me, I'll explain some of them to you later (lol, already too much typing).

    Trapstakes will be another item you'll need, as well as a trap hammer.

    Good luck trying to find these things that are made in the US! Most everything nowadays is import.

    If you want to stop by my site, let me know who you are (from here) and I'll make you some a good deal on the traps you're looking for, and save you alittle more money still. I'll help a young trapper get started anyway I can.
    http://smittystrapmods.proboards99.com
    (Mods-if I violate any forum rules in this, please delete my link, but leave the rest of the info please).

    I believe I gave you the link to the ISTA site (which the site was down earlier), and suggested you attend a Trappers Education class in your area.

    I'm probably missing something, but once you become more familiar with trapping, you'll probably develop a few more specific needs. Fortunately, you have some time to prep before season.

    Smitty
     
  12. sds888

    sds888 New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Townville, South Carolina
    I didnt have time to read in depth 223 's post but I am sure he covered everything else you needed but dont forget your bait. I will pm you my secert recipe coon bait as long as you promise not to be spreading the secert around. Dont want to lose any business. LOL :wink: There was also a recent post on coon bait that you might want to read.
     
  13. bobact

    bobact New Member

    Messages:
    45
    State:
    Indiana
    I know this is kind of a late answer to your question. Since you live in east central Ind. yu aren't to far from Hoosier Trapper Supply at Greensburg. [​IMG]. We used to buy all of our supplies from them. He always had reasonable prices and gave good prices for our furs. We always processed our own furs and got better prices for them. It kept him from having to do it. More than likely he knows some of the trappers on your own area. He can set you up with just about anything you would need and probably answer most of your questions. I was just trying to copy the e-mail address and the above is what came up. The site is : http://www.hoosiertrappersupply.com/trappingsupply.asp
    No, this is not an advertiement for them. That's just who we did our shopping with. I hope you have a lot of luck. Most of it is not luck, but the result of a lot of hard work. It's alot of fun but it's work to. How about that -fun/work. How cool is that?
     
  14. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    Robert made a slight mistake, Hoosier Trap Supply is in Greenwood, not Greensburg. It's off I-65 at the Greenwood exit (Exit 99 I think). Charlie & Mark (owners/brothers) are great people, but you'll be better off calling as opposed to sending an email. I do a fair amount of business with them myself. They have a neat place (full of their taxidermy work), if anyone's in the area you should stop by & check it out.

    Smitty
     
  15. bobact

    bobact New Member

    Messages:
    45
    State:
    Indiana
    Arrrgh! I can't take it. It's all too confusing! Greenwood, Greensburg, Greencastle! Would someone please make up my mind for me? Sorry about that. 'at ayre is plum embarassin'
     
  16. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    lol.....I've lived here nearly half a century & still do the same thing. My only reason for the correction was to save someone from asking directions once they arrived in "Greensburg" looking for HTS :wink: .

    Smitty