barometric pressure

Discussion in 'VIRGINIA RIVERS TALK' started by smitty1963, Mar 29, 2009.

  1. smitty1963

    smitty1963 New Member

    Messages:
    325
    State:
    Virginia
    I feel kinda silly asking this but when is the best time to fish??? when the pressure is high or low?????
     
  2. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy New Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    State:
    Virginia
    After a high pressure passes and the barometer is falling like a stone, the fish sense a weather change. (All animals also) and feed like condemmed men. Words of wisom taught me by my grandfather.
     

  3. smitty1963

    smitty1963 New Member

    Messages:
    325
    State:
    Virginia

    Thanks for the info sir
     
  4. screamnreels

    screamnreels Member

    Messages:
    599
    State:
    Halifax county
    High pressure in the air equals low pressure in the water,low pressure in the air equals high pressure in the water.The fish feed and swim more aggressive when the pressure in the water is high,causing the swim gland to collapse and allowing them to swim more freely.When the pressure is low in the water the swim gland expands restricting them to swim and feed less aggressive.
    This information came from Bill Dance not me...
     
  5. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    Name:
    Unspecified
    Don't feel silly at all; after all, there are all sorts of conflicting ideas about the effect of barometric pressure on fishing, most of them being simply fables (as the one posted above about inverse pressures...sorry!). The only thing that seems consistent is the conclusion--fish as a cold front approaches. However, this apparent truth (I believe it as well) is as likely to result from a variety of factors other than barometric pressure.

    In fact, I have always been skeptical about barometric pressure and the effect on fishing. Here's why. At a depth of only 32.8 feet below the surface of the river or lake, the water pressure on a fish alone is equal to the weight of the entire atmospheric pressure above him! In other words, the fish is experiencing two atmospheres' worth of pressure at this depth. When a fish simply moves up or down three feet, he changes his surrounding pressure by 1/10th atmosphere; whereas the most dramatic air pressure drop before a storm would not even approach this pressure difference!

    Temperature changes, cloud cover, wind, and other environmental factors most likely have a far greater impact on fish activity than barometric pressure.

    For more information, check out http://www.midcurrent.com/articles/science/ross_pressure_myth.aspx.
     
  6. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    Well that certainly dispels an old myth, but don't loose heart. You can still watch for the cows! :wink:
     
  7. screamnreels

    screamnreels Member

    Messages:
    599
    State:
    Halifax county
    So much for what that theory,I fish by the moon anyway.