Barometric Pressure affecting catfish

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by zivetor, Feb 1, 2007.

  1. zivetor

    zivetor New Member

    Messages:
    76
    State:
    Charleston, S.C.
    I hope you all aint tired of my Questions yet, but I need to know if it is true that high Barometric Pressure affects Catfishes swim bladder which will make them not bite. And if the Barometric Pressure is low that they will eat everything in thier path..

    Do you watch the BP prior during or after to decide your fishing trips???

    Thanks in advance..

    Lenny
     
  2. chrisblue

    chrisblue New Member

    Messages:
    1,345
    State:
    SC
    Your gonna get alot of different answers but I've caught fish on rising, falling,steady,steady high, steady medium and steady low.If I had to pick one that was most consistant for me it would be steady medium.The moon seems to have more effect on their overall mood to me.The moon is in full stage right now and for the past 4 days the catfish in my aquarium have not sit still.They get really active around the full moon and the new moon.
     

  3. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,170
    State:
    NC
    Yes I watch it, and I catch fish during every phase.

    Hope that helps. :lol:

    I used to record it, but I don't any more. In all seriousness I did catch fish during all periods, i.e. steady, falling, and rising. I think it does affect fishing, especially when it falls between major feeding times. I am not sure that it really affects the swim bladder as I have seen no research that proves that. I do think it could trip some primal instinct that says "FEED NOW BEFORE THE RIVER FLOODS!!" or says "RELAX, THE WEATHER IS GREAT".

    The bottom line is that I fish when I can and take what the lake gives me.
     
  4. Shrimp Man

    Shrimp Man New Member

    Messages:
    272
    State:
    South Carolina
    Great Answers Guy's.
     
  5. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

    Messages:
    118
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Barometric pressure doesn't really play a big role in the grand scheme of things concerning most catfishing but some folks associate it with problems or good fishing days due to highs and lows a lot of times come with fronts and the changing patterns of the jet stream bringing cold fronts in and what not and this is when highs and lows are the most erratic due to whatever. fronts will relocate catfish like a tornado will your house but that seems to be what happens and the fish are relocated due to several things possibly but just because fish relocate, don't mean they won't bite. things that usually happen with a barometric change is a wind direction shift ... wind direction change from south to north will push the forage fish south and scatter them so the groceries the catfish were feeding on have vacated the area. folks think that the fish are always there and the barometric pressure is rising/falling so it's not good to fish when it's falling or risin or staying still or standing on it's head. all that's happened is the fish have moved ... fish aren't always there in other words ... it's not because they're not biting. I have to find fish every day I'm on the water and if I don't then I'm in trouble. I seem to always find them no matter what the barometer is doing and I pay absolutely no attention to the barometer because it don't matter what it's doing. the things you pay attention to are wind direction, other wildlife and foodfish and learn to read the situations like you've had a wind constant out of the southeast for a few weeks then there's going to be a serious congregation of fish towards the northwest of the lake. now all the fish aren't going to be over on that side but there's going to be a leaning that way. when the wind shifts abruptly out of the north after you've been catching fish up on the northwest end of the lake and all of a sudden the wind is blowing the other way the next day then the shad and fish have become scattered ... gotta deal with that for a few days with the scattered fish but about the last part of the second day with a north wind you'll start to notice a leaning towards the southern shores locating fish by methods I've posted in other threads ... I've only posted about 12 posts so it should be easy enough to find those. then also when the wind turns back out of the southeast again then things will start to go back to normal with the majority of the fish kind of leaning towards the northern side. (this isn't to say that all lakes are going to be like that as they're not due to currents coming through from different directions and stuff but I'm just explaining about barometric pressure right now) once you've established somewhat of a pattern and the wind changes directions due to cold fronts or stuff like that then you have to relocate the fish is all. they're still feeding and you just have to find them. now what makes people think the "fish ain't biting" due to barometric pressure changes such as rising and falling is most of the time due to fronts that have relocated the fish so throw the barometers away and pay attention to the environment instead of the gadgets.
     
  6. kansas bluecatter

    kansas bluecatter New Member

    Messages:
    71
    State:
    Kansas
    Zivetor,
    I think the barometric pressure does have a lot to do with how active the fish are and whether they will bite or not. One thing I would like to mention is that if you get a chance to go fishing go ahead and go don't base it entirely on what the barometer is doing. I have caught fish in all stages. The worst for me is high pressure which occurs after a major front. This is usually pretty easy to identify because you get high clear bluebird skies with not a cloud in the sky. It will usually affect the bite for a couple of days but on the third day after a front it can be great fishing. One thing that seems to affect my bite especially in the winter is wind direction. I can be on a pretty good bite and if the wind switches to the North it is like they completly shut off. I have seen this happen a lot. Good luck and I hope this helps. John
     
  7. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    I'm not a fish, but I've done some diving.:wink:

    So, here's my two cents: moving up or down in the water column changes the ambient pressure on a fish a heckuva lot more, and faster, than shifts in barometric pressure. I have my doubts whether they even sense it.

    I agree with Tiny on the wind being a factor, but I don't believe the wind blows baitfish anywhere...they evolved in river systems with a lot more current than the wind will generate on a lake.

    The wind does, however, blow plankton, and if they can stand the water temp, the shad will follow, and so on. Everything's gotta eat...you can find me at Sonic.:lol:
     
  8. Foxhound

    Foxhound New Member

    Messages:
    403
    State:
    Georgia
    I agree with you also John. A lot of my "super" fishing trips have been on days just prior to a storm front with the barometer in a steady drop. But, I would not cancel a fishing trip due to a rising or steady barometer......it would take something a lot more serious like cant buy beer on sunday or something !!!
     
  9. catfish slick

    catfish slick New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    California
    Lenny
    That is a great question, I have heard that the moon has something to do with the catfish bite also. What I believe is that they are always on the move and the shurest way to find them is with a boat and fish fish finder. I had an old man tell me once. kid, anyone that would prodect the weather in California is eather a new commer are a dam fool. and I am beginning to think that is the way it is with trying to prodect the catfish bite. what I do know is never pass up a fishing trip,because someone tells you they are not going to bite because of this or that ,You will enjoy your self weather you catch fish are not. Now does anyone know whear I can get me a fish finder that will work from the bank. That would be great.
     
  10. Mountain Cur

    Mountain Cur New Member

    Messages:
    171
    State:
    Missouri, Warsaw
    This question, with ALL it's good answers is why we should keep a general record of our fishing trips (hunting also). It doesn't have to be detailed to any great extent and records of every trip don't have to be kept. You'll find you keep better account of those good fishing days than the bad; did I say bad? There is NO bad day fishing, some are just less enjoyable. Fish when you get a chance..................
     
  11. troyedm

    troyedm New Member

    Messages:
    83
    State:
    edmond oklahoma
    foxhound you must have visited arkansas on sunday. used to you couldn't buy beer on sunday in little rock unless you went to a resturaunt.
     
  12. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

    Messages:
    118
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I didn't say the wind actually blew the shad ... I said the shad tend to end up leaning or heading in the direction the wind is blowing for whatever reasons, be it an undertoe created by the wind or whatever may cause them to move out when fronts come through. people think the fish stop biting when fronts move in and they don't... they just make a drastic location change where once there were fish on the northern end when the winds were out of the southeast or south and then the front move through and they relocate and usually when the fronts move through they pull back off the shallows as the shad move outta there because of the front .. I've seen it happen more times than I can count and, for me not being able to predict their movements would be a really bad thing. if fish stopped biting because of fronts or barometric changes then it would be detrimental to my income in other words. they don't stop biting ... they just relocate when fronts hit. out of about 100 trips last year I caught less than 50 lbs in maybe 4 or 5 trips and two or three of those were during the spawn so those probably shouldn't count anyhow. after the third week of may on keystone the mature fish make a mass exodus out of the lake and head up river ... they don't get back good until about the third week of August. when you figure out where they go when fronts hit or tend to go then you'll catch fish. there are degrees of this also ... if it's just a weak front the fish will pull back just a little ways and you may see most fish caught in an average of 3 ft deeper water when these weak fronts move in ... if it's a good strong front in the fall they'll pull back a long ways. keystone lake has more shad per acre than any other lake in oklahoma due to it's muddy waters and lack of predators so when I'm fishing up in the northwestern arm of keystone for weeks and the shad are thick up there ... you can literally catch 20 or 30 shad in the fall up there with a 5 ft net anywhere you through the net they're so thick ... if a strong front moves in there will be no shad in that stretch from cowskin bay to osage point (4 mile stretch) and all be located where the lake bends back to the east. I mean completely void of shad. when you have that many shad in a lake and see them move like that after fronts hit it gives you a really good idea of how fronts effect them ... the day after the strong cold fronts you can forget catching fish up in the northwest end and down to cowskin bay and the only acception to this is if there's been a good flood prior to this front where there's a good current flow coming into the lake ... it will still impact the fish and make them move drastically south but there are things that will counter the front and make fish stay up in the northwest end and that's current eddys right up by the mouth of the river where it dumps into the lake. all the fish that were out on the shallow mud flats will be gone south though ... you can either catch them by and in the current eddy or you have to go south until you start seeing good numbers of shad. when the shad are moved south like that they really pile up down there and it's easy to see where fish are harassing them on the fish finder. I'm talking about shad super thick from top to bottom in 20 ft of water for a stretch of a mile or two just after the strong fronts move in and all the shad that were up in the northern end will be down south except for when there's current. there were three or four occasions last year when the shad moved like that for no aparent reason also but those instances are rare. for the most part shad like to swim towards whereever the current is coming from so if the lake current is backwards they'll swap ends ... that happened last year as well ... we had a massive flood up on the arkansas arm where the flow of water was great enough that it reversed he low on the cimarron arm for many miles up river ... the flood water was coming in and the lake was rising and the cimarron got no rain at all and the fish that were in the cimarron arm made a massive migration towards the main part of the lake and held in there until the lake quit rising and the current flow went back to normal. Things like this make people think the fish just aren't biting and it wasn't because they quit biting ... it was because they moved. when what once made that area a desirable place for them to be is drastically changed by the fronts such as food, oxygenation of the water, comfort levels are changed or whatever. I suggest people learn the environment they're fishing and how the fish react to the elements instead of just going by the old sayings because they don't hold true such as "fishing's best when the barometer is rising" or fishing's best or worse when the barometric pressure is high etc etc.
     
  13. Deerslayer29

    Deerslayer29 New Member

    Messages:
    76
    State:
    Ohio
    I'm bringing this one back alive to say that I've caught Cats in high pressure and low pressure but I do have better luck with it falling or stable. Seems that if its rising they dont bite as well because if its rising that usually means a front just went through and after the front I catch less. Before a front with falling is great.
     
  14. Lowly Bank Angler

    Lowly Bank Angler New Member

    Messages:
    215
    State:
    Omaha, Nebraska
    research shows barometric pressure has some effect on the swim bladders of certain fish, the question is, does this include catfish?
     
  15. playin4funami

    playin4funami New Member

    Messages:
    4,104
    State:
    Saronville Ne.
    I do like to see a falling barometer when heading out fishing, it usually means here that a storm or front is comming and the fish will bite very well right before a storm if you are in the right location. But like sounar tables, moon phases, etc. I don't plan fishing trips around it, I go whenever I can and damn the torpedos. The only condition I dislike alot is a dead calm(no wind) seems like I always have super slow days with no wind.