bank sinkers

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by LEROYDOZOIS, Nov 28, 2007.

  1. LEROYDOZOIS

    LEROYDOZOIS New Member

    Messages:
    1,542
    State:
    Arizona
    i was going to buy them cause their the cheapest lead i can find but i was kinda conserned when i throw it out if it will keep my mainline from passing throw it

    i use the carolina rig so thats why im asking

    like it will roll over and wind up my line :tounge_out:
     
  2. bumper

    bumper New Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    State:
    Georgia
    Just use a swivel bigger than the eye of the weight, or better yet, use a bead between your weight and swivel. This will keep your line from passing thru and will help protect your knot. Sometimes the weight will roll and twist up your line a little, but a good swivel will eliminate most of that. Hope this helps and good luck fishin'.
     

  3. badkarma

    badkarma New Member

    Messages:
    772
    State:
    Oxford,Miss
    I've been using bank sinkers for right at 45 years and I never had one roll up my line.
     
  4. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Not enough to even consider using other types sinkers. Each type of sinker has a designed application. The bank sinker is a good all around sinker, except in strong currents.
     
  5. Crucial

    Crucial New Member

    Messages:
    225
    State:
    Virginia Beach VA
    Maybe I'm not understanding completely, but:

    In a carolina rig, any bass fisherman will tell you that the bead is an important element in the rig. This would be more true when using heavy leads, including the bank sinker.

    If you thread your line through the eye of the sinker, thread on a large bead right after the lead, then a swivel, then your leader/trace with the hook attached, you should be fine. This will keep the lead from sliding down onto your bait or damaging your line.

    You can also do a "home made" fishfinder rig with bank sinkers by using a large swivel. Thread the swivel on your line via the eye, not the clasp. Place a bead on, either after the swivel, or on both sides of the swivel(I use two for some reason??). Then using the clasp through the eye of the bank sinker you can attach a verity of weights with out retying.
    Again, on your main line (after the bead/swivel assembly) attach a swivel and then attach your leader/trace to that swivel.

    Bank sinkers are fine, and quite flexible in use. They do tend to lend them self to being on the end of the rig a little more so. Consider using a high-low rig, with either a single or double dropper, and the bank sinker at the end of the main line as an alternative.

    Will your line twist or tangle? Yea from time to time it will, especially in current.. but that's fishing brother! We are, or become, knot experts. Not from tying knots but from untying knots tangles and bird's nests :smile2:
     
  6. LEROYDOZOIS

    LEROYDOZOIS New Member

    Messages:
    1,542
    State:
    Arizona
    i mean the weight will twist the mainline just enough to keep it from slipping as freely as a no roll or egg sinker :smile2:

    srry i was kinda vage on that one

    thanks for all the posts though:wink:
     
  7. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    Whatcha guys mean by bank sinkers?
     
  8. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I can see no way the bank sinker will cause your line to twist. The sinker is an inanimate object. It lies still. The bait may work in a circle, twisting the line, but the sinker won't. If you are thinking the bank sinker would roll in the current and wrap the line around itself, no, that don't happen either. If the current is that strong it is going to simply slide the sinker along the bottom. What I would recommend is that you invest in several styles of sinkers, and in various weights, to suit your needs as they arise. There is not one sinker that will do everything. In water with a strong current, you want at the least a no-roll sinker or a no-snag sinker. Heck, if it is that strong you may want a claw sinker. Bank sinkers are good for calm waters... or sluggish waters. You got to match the tackle with the conditions.
     
  9. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Leroy, Just for clarification, is this what your referring to?
     

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  10. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    well if it did rigging up as said in post #5 would keep it free. main line snap swivel maybe a bead or two swivel with leader and hook add what ever weight to the snap swivel:cool2:
     
  11. crazy

    crazy New Member

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    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
  12. Ulikedew

    Ulikedew New Member

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    1,821
    State:
    Georgetown IN
  13. LEROYDOZOIS

    LEROYDOZOIS New Member

    Messages:
    1,542
    State:
    Arizona
    THATS EVEN THE SAME SIZE TOO:wink:
     
  14. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Okay LeRoy, what I said in the 8th post on this thread should hold true. Don't worry about line twist... it will be minimal.
     
  15. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    i made some homemade sinker slides that someone sugested by cutting small lengths of aquarium air hose and squeezing them through the eyes of some size1 brass snap swivels. looks like they will work good. now i need some warm enough weather for me to try them out.
     
  16. mrmarkedwards

    mrmarkedwards Active Member

    Messages:
    919
    State:
    Delaware