Baits used for these animals!

Discussion in 'Trapping & Fur Taking' started by channelcat_tracker, Jul 11, 2006.

  1. channelcat_tracker

    channelcat_tracker New Member

    Messages:
    582
    State:
    Iowa
    what baits should i use for these specific animals. and do i do anything specific to my traps. and what trap should i use for these specific animals. knowing this smitty will be here and its been a while since weve chatted. here we go:

    1) muskrat

    2) coon

    3) coyote

    4) red fox

    5) otter

    6) skunk

    7) beaver

    thanks to all who comment. remember, i need to know what trap to use, scents/lures/baits, and do i need to do anything specific to my traps for that one fur bearer???
     
  2. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    lol.....I'm glad you place so much faith in me Tony :tounge_out: , but I'm sure not the only trapper here, so I hope the others will add their thoughts & opinions as well. There's sure alot more info & methods out there thanI could even begin to cover.

    1) muskrat- I don't use "baited" sets, however on floaters, corn, cherryoil, potato & apple slices, and a few veggies would work as well as add attraction. Blind sets & feedbed sets can both be used unbaited, as can pocket sets.

    2) coon- The 1st 2 (smells) that come to mind are fishy and sweet. Keep in mind that fishy will also attract cats (of the domestic type) and skunk. Jack Mackeral is a good inexpensive bait, carp, chicken bones, marshmellows, fishoil, and a number of commercially produced baits & lures.

    3) coyote- I'd suggest any number of the more well-known lure manufacturers products, and it would depend on the time of the season as to the type of lure (gland, food, curosity, call-type lure). Lennons Lures, Dobbins, Tom Beaudette, Blackies Blend, Leatherwood Creek, and many more.

    4) red fox- Same as above

    5) otter- No experience/no season here

    6) skunk- See coon

    7) beaver Like muckrat, many are taken in slides & crossovers, which require no bait. Most lure when used, is castor based, as in making a castor mound (mud-pie, whatever it's called in your area) sets.

    I'm gonna add a few things Tony, take them for what they are, friendly advice. I'd mentioned to you about doing as much reading & research on the animals you intend to trap. The internet holds a wealth of information which is available at the click of a mouse. You can type in any of the furbearers listed above & learn quite abit about them, habitats, breeding cycles, dispersal, home range, food prefferences, identifying footprints & scat (sign),etc. This is in addition to attending a Trappers Education class in your area.

    Becoming good at something requires alot of hard work, like trapping. Many that are unfamiliar with it don't have any idea of the effort required to consistantly make catches, especially when they are specific to the species you are targeting. I'd suggest that you spend a pre-determined amount of time (say an hour a day, or whatever you can do that doesn't conflict with your responsibliities at home & school), get a notebook & pencil, and start making a notebook of information you've learned about the animals you intend to target. Trust me in that if you do this, it will be retained in your memory for a long time, and you can always refer back to your notes for help. lol, If you're like I was, you "dislike" homework....but that is part of becoming a good trapper, just as studying in order to graduate & get a good job.

    As far as trap sizes, here are some guidelines you can go by:

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/traps/trapsizes1.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/traps/trapsizes2.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/223smitty/traps/trapsizes3.jpg

    Using the proper (size/type) trap for your target animal, as is having one that is properly adjusted, for example pan tension, and properly leveled & tuned, with a proper chain & swivel set-up will be the best place to start. Don't worry about learning how to modify traps for now (but DO learn how to properly adjust, maintain & treat them), that can come later, stick with the "basics" first. You didn't start-out in 9th grade in school did ya? :wink:

    At this early point in your trapping career, I hope you would postpone attempting to use any beaver traps, until you have been properly instructed in how to do so. More than 1 trapper has lost his life in such situations, especially when trapping alone.....1 slip, you get caught in an anchored trap, but you were never taught how to remove a trap from yourself with 1 hand, and you'll find yourself with a bad case of hypothermia.....or worse. I'm saying this for your own welfare Tony, not mine. I wouldn't put a loaded weapon in the hands of someone who'd never held one before, and I'd treat the larger traps just the same.....and it isn't "age" that's a factor, it's the persons "experience".

    I feel that you might have thought I came down hard on you a time or two before (that wasn't my intention, and I hope you know that)......but if it would save your life, or make you a better law-abiding trapper that will pass on one of the oldest parts of this countrys heratige.......lol, I'll be the biggest jerk you ever met! :big_smile:


    Smitty
     

  3. sds888

    sds888 New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Townville, South Carolina
    what he said sounds good to me. but i will add
    Otter same conibear set as beaver but no lure. At least this works for me.
     
  4. gooboy

    gooboy New Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    Minden,La.
    Tony, you've got some really good answers from Smitty on this already. There's not much I can add to his list. I will 2nd Stephens comments about the otter though. I have had no luck in baiting or luring otters. I've tried numerous times. Nothing beats a good blind set for them. They are a creature of habit like most all animals and will frequent the same areas over and over. If you can find an otter toilet, it's as good of a set that you can find for them.

    I want to say something about blind sets. A lot of areas that you will trap, will have some very good natural funnels and trails. These places are ideal for catching traveling animals. In a lot of situations, animals are caught easier in a blind set than a bait set. There's a couple different reasons for this. One, the animal is moving about his normal routine and does not have to detour from its course to work your baited set. The second and most important reason that I like blind sets, is that the animal is less leary, especially canines. If the animal changes from a traveling mode to a hunting mode, it becomes more cautious. Making your baited or lured sets to be scrutinized closely in some instances. I'm not trying to talk you out of making baited sets, I simply want to remind you that sometimes blind sets are a better option.

    And last but not least, I'm gona harp on the safety aspect of using the larger traps. Until you get your feet wet with some of the smaller traps, please leave the large beaver traps and conibears out of your arsenal. These traps are very dangerous. Smitty was not exagerating one bit, with his remarks about trappers loosing there lives because of being caught. I've only been snapped by 2 large conibears in my life, and I've literally set thousands of them. The reason behind this is because I'm scared to death of them. They hurt!! Both times my wife got me out of them. Glad she was there! Now my partner, Tony Howard, has been caught a bunch of times! I got him outa 3 personnally. I think he enjoys the pain! LOL

    Good luck Tony! Looking forward to hearing about your traplines this coming winter!
     
  5. petedawg

    petedawg New Member

    Try some sardines or something similar and the ole`man said hes been using peanutbutter and it doesnt fall off of the trip plate as other baits do.

    fox and coyote try any left over meat scraps and if you live on the wild side,stop and pick up some road kill :eek:oooh:
     
  6. petedawg

    petedawg New Member

    we use fermented corn in feeder buckets too attract coon and hold them to areas,so you may be able to adapt that to the coon trapping side of it.i know the coons love it back around the house.
     
  7. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    Thank God you did not go in to detail about what all parts of my body I caught in conibears last year.
     
  8. gooboy

    gooboy New Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    Minden,La.
    Tony, I wouldn't dare tell them about the day you was setting a 280 in your lap and it fired hitting the end of your........:eek:oooh: no! I wouldn't dare tell. It would make you look kinda....shall we say, less than brilliant!:lol:
     
  9. TA2D

    TA2D New Member

    Messages:
    886
    State:
    Nebraska
    You guys get my respect, I don't think that I have motivation to do a trap line.

    Aaron

    TA2D
     
  10. Coyote1

    Coyote1 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Missouri
    Dear Brother Stoll;
    I can tell you exactly how to go about catching or at least getting the attention of Critter #3 on your list! :big_smile: :roll_eyes: :wink: :cool2:
    Now this is for one specific Critter around here.
    Large Quantities of Bills in $100 denominations will get you attention time.
    Winning Numbers to Lottery's over $1,000,000 will get you a lot of attention and personal thanks along with a photo of you with your catch. NOTE: The catch will of course have to be temporary or the Raven/wife of this critter will come looking and you would NOT want to mess with her!! She normally and constantly makes soft drink can sized shots out over a quarter of a mile away!!! Hint-Hint!
    But that is how you could catch this one Critter for a short while!
    Take Care.
    Fraternally,
    Coyote1
    [[[[[End of a very informative post :roll_eyes: :lol: ]]]]]
     
  11. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    Thanks there partner.
     
  12. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    So Michael.......do you stride like John Wayne.....with the voice of Olive Oil?? :crazy: :big_smile:


    Smitty
     
  13. bobact

    bobact New Member

    Messages:
    45
    State:
    Indiana
    Tony,
    223Smitty has given you some sage advise that's great even for an experienced trapper. Everyone can forget something from time to time and on the trapline, this could be very serious.
    A few years back my Bro's brother-in-law (Ray Long) and I were settin' some 330 Conibears on the east fork of White River north of Seymour, IN. We were setting them in some runs near a very active feeding shelf. He was in the boat, setting the traps and tossing them to me up on the bank. The cold wet nasty weather as we have here had him chilled down quite a bit and as anyone knows, that can slow your reactions down. His hands slipped off of the setting tongs. The handle of the tongs caught him just under the chin. It layed him open to the bone up to the corner of his mouth. Dad told him to do it again on the other side and he would like Howdy Doody. Needless to say we had to forget running the rest of the line for a trip to the hospital. That after another 5 miles down river to get to the truck.
    Just be careful! Accidents can happen. Remember Murphy's basic law:
    Nothing is as easy as it looks, everything takes longer than you expect and if anything can go wrong, it will at the worst possible moment.
     
  14. mattoonboy4

    mattoonboy4 New Member

    Messages:
    89
    State:
    Illinois
    beaver are about the only animal i feel confident enought to give advise on so here it goes...first and foremost, if u cant set a #5 double long spring without steppin on it then stay away from it and if u have the slightest bit of trouble with settin a 330 with tongs then just stick to everything else til your hands get in "trappin shape." also, if u r just startin out, try to get a friend to come along, still to this day i like to bring a partner(the outdoors is more fun if u share it). but if u feel comfortable with these traps the u r in for one helluva time. castor, castor, castor, castor is all i can say for beaver. if u cant set a blind set for 330, i would stick to slides and mounds. i use castor from beavers i catch in different bodies of water than i trap, but u can use store bought as well cuz it works just as good.