Baiting,Food plots and feeding?

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by SGTREDNECK, Oct 10, 2009.

  1. SGTREDNECK

    SGTREDNECK New Member

    Messages:
    1,522
    State:
    Tennessee
    So baiting deer with food is illegal in most places once the season starts. But you are still aloud to plant food plots to attract and feed the deer? My question is what is the difference except one in growing in the ground and the other is dumped on the ground. Is one really that much more sporting than the other. Not to me. I personally think they both should be legal to those who want to do them. I personally don't do either. But making one illegal and not the other doesn't make cents to me.Whats yalls thoughts on this.
     
  2. catman from owensboro

    catman from owensboro New Member

    Messages:
    569
    State:
    ky
    we can do both. and if your place was like mine we got 17 ac. and it off right off the highway. we get very little deer comming thourgh you would do it.or you would get any deer.and feeding deer help growth to.
     

  3. SGTREDNECK

    SGTREDNECK New Member

    Messages:
    1,522
    State:
    Tennessee
    I dont do it because I don't have my own private land. I see nothing wrong with it, and would do it if I had my own land.
     
  4. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD
    We can bait deer, either way, dumping corn or feed or planting. Its all legal. Waterfowl on the other hand cannot be baited..... but here is what makes me mad:

    I cannot dump corn on the ground or in the water to kill ducks/geese. Somebody with money can make a pond in the middle of a field, drain the pond and plant corn. When duck/goose season opens, they can pump water into the "pond" and flood the corn right up to the ears. How is this any different than me dumping 50# of corn in the cornfield? Deer will travel to bait, but wont stay there. Ducks and geese in a field full of flooded corn will stay there. Nobody within miles will be able to kill ducks/geese unless they are dumping corn on the ground.:angry:
     
  5. catman from owensboro

    catman from owensboro New Member

    Messages:
    569
    State:
    ky
    i just wish i could kill the turkey comming in they eat at my feeders all day.i can kill the deer but not the turkey ky law's.it work put plots and keep corn in feeders. my boy killed his first today. 13 years old post pics in another post....
     
  6. ladyfish50

    ladyfish50 New Member

    Messages:
    4,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    Here in Louisiana we can do both. We have had food plots, we've had feeders, we've dumped corn, we've put out mineral blocks...yep, we've done it all.
    I've heard all the arguments, pro & con. I tend to agree with Ted Nugent on this; If you hunt in a cut corn field, even if it's an agricultural crop, that's using bait. If you hunt next to a wild pear or plum tree, that's using a natural bait. If you hunt a fresh clover field, that's bait. As far as it not being sporting, any of us who have actively hunted for mature deer, buck or doe, knows how incredibly smart these animals are. That's why, when you finally "close the deal" on one, you feel so PROUD!
     
  7. catfishinsc

    catfishinsc New Member

    Messages:
    507
    State:
    SC
    I don't see a difference in hunting over bait or a planted field either. Both are unnatural food sources to the deer. I prefer a field though, especially soybeans, but baiting can be easier and you don't have to worry about rain or how well it grows. Never had much luck with fall plants though, deer don't seem to come to them as consistently as they do to soybeans or bait. I also like having cameras over bait and seeing exactly what's coming in there and when, which isn't as easy with a food plot. I would not be opposed to a ban on hunting over bait here though.

    The reason the laws are the way they are is because it's easy to create a ban on bait (plus there's more opposition against it), but it would be pretty hard to outlaw hunting over planted fields. One of two things would have to happen, either outlaw hunting over any planted fields, even those planted for commercial purposes, which will most likely have more opposition than any other regulations on deer other than a complete ban on deer hunting, or you'd have to have a way to distinguish between a field planted commercially and one planted specifically for deer, which would most likely have way too much gray area and ways to circumvent the law. The first one would also have some grey area, such as if a field wasn't planted this year, but plants grew from seeds left in the ground from last year's harvest. Plus, how long until a field planted in a plant that comes back every year, such a clover, isn't considered a planted field?