Baiting Deer?

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by Creteus, Jan 25, 2006.

  1. Creteus

    Creteus New Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    State:
    Loganville, GA
    Guys I never made it deer hunting last year and plan to this year. My folks have 91 acres in north georgia, only twelve are woods. The deer population was so high a few years back that the county released coyotes to thin out the numbers of deer. Well this year I couldn't even find a track crossing the back creek. Any ideas on what I can do through out the year to get them back in the woods before this years season? The twelve acres of my families is backed by 100 acres of another persons land. So there is plenty of woods for them to roam.

    Thanks

    Matt
     
  2. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    I use feeders w/ whole kernal corn. It keeps the deer comming in all year long. The mostly use it at night, but if you have a trail camera, you can set it up by the feeder & see whats comming in.
     

  3. bro_catfish

    bro_catfish New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    Ohio ,Coshocton County
    You could use a bait feeder to attrack them back into your comfort hunting area, but I personaly belive that hunting over a feeder is wrong
     
  4. Creteus

    Creteus New Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    State:
    Loganville, GA
    Bro catfish, I'm with you there. I really don't want to use any kind of feeder bringing the deer to one spot. What I had in mind is more wide spead to cover large areas. To a manner of natural movement of the deer.
     
  5. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,299
    State:
    Kentucky
    Name:
    your first name
    I got a few ideas. First dig a pond for a watering hole or set out some wash tubs to catch rain. You could also let some of the open areas grow into the nastiest crap it can. Say an acre or two or whatever you can. THis would provide browse, bedding area and bucks love the nasty stuff. You could also get creative with this and bushhog lanes through the brush. This allows you to sneak in if you want without getting too cut up. Also doing this you can somewhat influence the deers movement. Last but not least are feeders, salt blocks and putting out food plots.
     
  6. Creteus

    Creteus New Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    State:
    Loganville, GA
    Hey Brian, Thanks for the info. Theres a creek, about 10 feet wide, dividing the woods from the cow fields. In between the creek and the woods is a strip of land about 30 feet wide 600 yards long. In the spring and summer there are blackberry bushes everywhere, but the folks mow them down in the fall. I've heard I should plant peas, and corn in the open strip and leave the there to die in the fall. Any views on that. The only trick will be to keep the cows out. After you get out of the opening the woods head up a steep hill where we have three stands watching over the valley below. Its all hard woods back there so you can get a clean shot from the top of the hill to the opening and creek below. Its really a great setup if we can get the deer back. Thanks for the input guys. Keep it coming.

    Matt
     
  7. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Plant an acre of dixie lee peas and everybody else will have your problem.
     
  8. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,299
    State:
    Kentucky
    Name:
    your first name
    Ive never put out any food plots but peas or corn sound fine. If your after other game as well say turkey I would look at chufa too. If it was mine I would let the blackberries grow and cut paths through them. You could also mix in your corn or peas in this same area where its been mowed. Maybe you could talk the folks into just mowing one half one year and the other half another year. You could have shooting lanes for you and walking lanes and bedding areas for the deer.
     
  9. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    Matt I think the Key word here is Cow fields. The cows may be keeping the deer way. I know ours did. But the deer still used the wood strips. If you have a place to plant a good food plot that will bring them in.
    Also if you can plant a few fruit trees now for the deer in later years. I have 9 persimon trees aorund a food plot always covered with deer early.
    Pete

     
  10. truck

    truck New Member

    Messages:
    156
    State:
    williamsburg ohio
    Whitetail clover & rape mix,deer will come from miles aroung and stay;)
     
  11. Creteus

    Creteus New Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    State:
    Loganville, GA
    Thanks alot guys you've given some great ideas. The cows will be moved to the front fields until the back pasture is ready to be bailed. I think I'll take the cutaways in the back strip and till up the grass and throw out everything that you guys said to plant. Thanks again for all the ideas.

    Matt
     
  12. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Matt, I just know, Everytime I plant Dixie Lee peas either they got mowed down while young and tender or either its a case of I tell everyone that the pea pickin commences tomorrow and tomorrow brings a decimated crop of peas.
    It's like sweet corn and racoons. They know exactly when to hit those fields. Its like they can smell the ripeness on the wind.

    For all you gardners out there. The only pea I have found the deer dont care for is Purple Hull Crowder Peas. In fact, when I plant them, the traffic in my garden comes to a crawl.
     
  13. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    here in illinois its got to be natural feeding. like crops and such. baiting or hunting near pourposly spilled corn or salt blocks will get ya a trip to the court system. check into the laws before doing those things. not sure how strickt they they are out in your neck of the woods.
     
  14. bowtech29

    bowtech29 New Member

    Messages:
    12
    State:
    TN
    I agree with the letting the fields grow over. Coyotes, especially here in the south, are more of a disturbance to game then an eliminator. Coyotes are just like there cousins the common dog, they travel alot and mainly will not attack any large game unless it is wounded or weak. They are definitely no match for a deer especially one graced by God with the defenses of antlers. Bobcats are more known to attack deer, but coyotes just keep them weary and moving to new undisturbed territory. I would however suggest to stay away from a whole kernel corn it is a pass through for the most part even though the deer are rumenoids. I would however allow my fields to grow over creating good cover, which rabbits and quail will appreciate as well, an then plant some type of clover wether it be a Co-op mix or a commercial substite. i.e. Whitetail Institute or Bio-logic. Stay away from SALT it is a natural thirst provider allowing game to enjoy and then fill themselves with water to quench their thirst creating wasted energy and time which would be better for supplying themselves with nutrients for racks or body weight depending on the sex. The only time I find corn of use is in my rack-catchers in late winter/early spring but it is just an attractant not used for a feeding purpose.
     
  15. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,299
    State:
    Kentucky
    Name:
    your first name
    Just another thought is if you notice alot of coyote or signs of coyote you may want to trap a few or shoot a few if possible(legal). Even if they dont kill the deer they could possibly keep the deer away. Do you or can you hunt any of the hardwoods? Around here last year the only time I saw deer in a field was when they were passing from woods to woods. We had an awesome acorn crop so they stayed mostly in the woods. And post some pics of the finished product if ya can.
     
  16. catsmith1

    catsmith1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,073
    State:
    Haughton, Louisiana
    If you are worried about the coyote population (as I am) you ought to check into calling yotes. I will warn you though, it is addictive. I have not found a 12 step program yet that will help.:crying:

    Seriously, I started calling a while back and am getting the hang of it. The more I read the more serious I take it. While coyotes will not gang up on full grown deer they are more than a match for youngins. The coyote population under the right conditions will get out of hand fast and the impact of overpopulation leads to more disease and they can put a hurting on the small game population.

    On the other hand I plant soybeans and crimson clover for food plots.

    Give yote hunting a try, you might find a new hobby.:rolleyes:

    Robert
     
  17. solomon

    solomon New Member

    Messages:
    735
    State:
    MS
    Here are just a few things we do every year. Red top clover, rye grass, wheat, salt blocks, etc. We usually have enough acorns to suffice. Also have a lot of crabapple trees and some pears we planted. There is about an equal amount of woods and land, and we usually do pretty good. I think one of the most important things is not to wait until the fall planting season to start thinking about what your gonna do for the deer that year. If you want to manage a good herd, than you need to be consistent with your practices, and pay attention to your land year round. We never put out corn until this year, since all the acorn trees blew down and we couldn't access the plots to plant anything. By no means do we hunt over the corn, but when everyone around you is pouring it out by the truckload, you've got to do something to keep them around. If you can, put out a couple of cameras. It helps to see what kind of shape your deer are in, when they're moving, etc. Cater to them. Watch the bucks carefully, as they are easier to recognize over and over. Once you get things rolling and you've got a good herd, manage the herd wisely. Be particular about what you shoot. Keep the buck doe ratio in check, and encourage others around you to do the same. You might not see results the first year, or even the second, but it will pay off. It also never hurts to consult with your local wildlife biologist about how you should manage them. They've got some great ideas on growing trophy deer, and keeping a healthy herd in general. Good luck! :)
     
  18. Creteus

    Creteus New Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    State:
    Loganville, GA
    This was my grandfathers land before he died and he was a man who believed his land was his land and the game warden could stay off his land or get shot. He never was one for the rules. If it endangered his way of life he'd take care of the problem. He shot hawks because the killed his rabbits. He'd shot a deer in the full moonlight if the freezer was empty. Figured they were eating his garden so he'd eat them. Now I know the rules are in place for a reason, keeping over hunting down, and I follow them to the "T", but if it illegal to kill a coyote in the state of Georgia then send me a ticket:cool: . My grandfather and I used to sit on the tailgate and wait on'um.

    As for planting, Wheres the best place to get all the seeds you guys think would be good. Think I'm just going to roll the dirt once, mix all the seeds together, and just toss them every which a way. Let'um grow up and die off.

    Hey Robert keep on shootin:thumbsup:


    Matt
     
  19. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,299
    State:
    Kentucky
    Name:
    your first name
    Most states have a year round open season, all your supposed to have is a hunting license and a deer tag during deer season, i think?
     
  20. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy New Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    State:
    Virginia
    Plant a little clover. If big bucks come to a feeder, it will be at night. They don't get big being stupid. Does are something else. They love feeders. ;)