Baitcaster help

Discussion in 'Fishing Reel Review' started by brinley45cal, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    guys i love my baitcasters i have ABU 7000s and a 6500c3,but i must be doing something wrong.EVERY time i cast them i birdnest,at least a little so i have to let some line out and reel it back on.What am i doing wrong?if you have the spool to tight will it make you birdnest?i dont know mybe im not thumbing the spool right or at the right time idont know.I set it up like everyone says push the botten and set to where your line fall without nesting is that correct?do you think it could be the line im using?
    I sure could use some help i have four of them and i want to be abe to fish well and cast far i just dont have anyone close that can show me,please help a brother out,If anyone lives in or near frankfort KY that could helpi would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. TNcat

    TNcat New Member

    Messages:
    150
    State:
    TN
    James what you need to do is adjust the brake. Hold the rod up at a 45 degree angle, with the bait approximatley 18 inches from the tip of the pole. Open the bell and adjust the brake "which will probably be located on the right side of the reel" and will be round. By twisting the knob foward will tighten the brake and backwards will losen the brake. You know it is correct when you can open the bell and the bait falls slowly to the graound and after hitting the ground the spool will only turn approximatlet one more turn. Hope this helps.
     

  3. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    The causes can be but a few simple things... (1) your not setting the tension correctly on the reel for the weight your using. If you are still in a learning stage (and that may last for a few years, lol) keep the tension tight. It is better to sacrifice slightly on distance than to get a bird nest. (2) your line can be "unforgiving". It was wound in coils on the spool when you bought it. If you don't spool it onto your reel the right way, your introducting twists into you line, and when you cast, it springs up like a bad hair do. (3) your thumb control is not quite where it should be yet. The only way to get it there is to practice. From the gear you listed, you are serious about your fishing... look at the literature for your reel (should be able to find it on-line if you no longer have it available). Follow the instructions explicitly for adjusting the reel to your line and weight. Look at the literature which accompanied your line and make sure you spool it onto your reel correctly. Get out there and throw that darn thing. Don't try for distance, don't use force. Learn how to let the line out of the reel and control it with your thumb. Backlashes or bird nests are going to happen, you just have to learn to control them. It is hard, but it is so easy also.
     
  4. dahoss2002

    dahoss2002 New Member

    Messages:
    206
    State:
    Louisiana
    If u backlash at the beginning of a cast, it is because u dont have enough mechanical braking or thumb control. The older model abu's 6000 and 6500 only have a 2 pin mechanical braking system. The 6500's for 2006 have an adjustable braking system from 0 - 6 pins. U must remove the sideplate to adjust the brakes. I did something unique to my older abu's. I epoxied a "rare-earth" magnet in all my older abu's onto the inside of the sideplate and this helps very much in eliminating overrun at the beginning of a cast. You can do a websearch for "Magging" or "Magging an Avet" Thats where I got the ideas.
     
  5. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    Thanks its all good advice,i just feel like im missing something.then on top of that 6500c3 only has one knob to deal with but the 7000 has two!Man this is harder then i thought.Do you keep your thumb on the spool the whole time or just when the bait hits the water?
     
  6. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    Dont feel bad, I have been using baitcasters for years and still get overruns..It's pretty hard to adjust that break so 16-ozs of lead falls slowly.;)
     
  7. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    I heard that bro.:D especially in the dark! lol

    James; on your 7000 it's the adjustment on the left that is so critical, get out your directions! The brake on the right is fairly simple. Follow TNcat's advice.
    Last fall Bigcatwilly got a new 7000. He ask me if I would like to try it out, big mistake! lol The brake was set fine, but I fooled around with the knob on the left. It might have been alright except that I got hung in a branch and didn't know it. WOW that baby spun up so fast even I couldn't get the birds nest out! And I consider my self a pro ( I've had a lot of practice). It ended up being pretty funny because of the look on his face! lmao I'm glad he is a good friend! We even took a picture. I lost over half of his brand new line. Ultimately it was his fault because I turned him down the first two times he offered, but he kept on insisting.lol
     

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  8. slimepig

    slimepig New Member

    Messages:
    666
    State:
    Kerrville Texas
    yes, your thumb should be near the spool the whole cast. not enough to slow the spool, but just barely enough to keep the line in check. actually if doing it right you wont actually be touching the spool but will feel the line coming off the spool. and remember to put yer thumb on the spool to stop it when yer cast hits or just before yer cast hits the water.
    you need to set yer brake every time you change the amount of weight yer casting. the way i do mine is after rigging and baiting up i tighten the brake, hold my rod up, push the casting button, and slowly loosen the brake until the weight slowly starts falling to the ground.
     
  9. Shawn

    Shawn New Member

    Messages:
    408
    State:
    Illinois
    I try to do what Slimepig is saying myself...

    A few thoughts on those "mechanical brakes"
    Using the brake controls to control backlash tends to be over-emphasized, imho. Anytime you use the mechanical brake, it affects casting distance and accuracy (you have to use more casting speed to acheive the same distance due to the additional friction.)

    Also, if your throwing several ounces of weight more than 50 feet your spool will be spinning pretty fast and that brake will not stop the backlash.

    I've heard someguys reccomend practicing with the least amount of brake you can get by with (you don't want to get backlashed from the instant your bait takes to the air), then really learn to use your thumb to control the spool. I think it's better when you can thumb more, and mechanical brake less. However, anything is better than a nasty backlash. And for fishing in the dark, I use my brake controls more.

    One reminder; if you're trying to cast to a specific spot in deeper water, before you lock the spool let your bait sink all the way to the bottom while letting line out. If you stop the spool completely, or lock-in your bait will fall at an angle and end up short of your target. If you let line out as the bait sinks, it will sink straight down.

    Shawn

    ps If it works in your situation, nothing wrong with using spinning gear while perfecting your baitcasting technique. And practice your casting!!!
     
  10. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    Let me add a little fuel to the fire here...LOL If you leave your thumb on the spool during the entire cast, you are sure to get it burned a time or two! I fish with heavy monofilament line and usually burn my thumb a time or two each trip. (It hurts a little more each time :cursing: ) I usually don't adjust the mechanical brake for different sized weights. The minimum weight I fish with is 5 ounces...up to ~15. I don't try to cast that much weight any great distance. A lob of about 20-30 feet is usually enough. The advice about allowing the spool to turn until the bait hits the bottom was good advice. Otherwise, you will be fishing close to straight down if you are in deep water.

    As for the mechanics of the cast, try a gentle cast with constant pressure on the spool. You don't need to press very hard, just enough to feel the spool turning. You might even try sidearm casting in the yard. Don't try for maximum distance or extreme accuracy at first. Just get the feel of the weight/rod/reel. Adjust the brake if you feel the need. Practice practice practice. As you become more comfortable with the feel, try different weights and work on placement. I think the biggest issue is how hard you try to cast. Start with gentle casts or even lobs. Work on timing for stopping the spool. It is awkward at first and can be aggravating! Time and practice will have you looking like a professional quickly!

    The way I learned to use a baitcaster was to go bass fishing with nothing else. It was either learn to use it, or don't fish. I learned. I still have the professional overrun now and then but that is to be expected when using up to a pound for a weight. You really have to be gentle and have sharp timing on the spool. Practice some more! That's the ticket!! I'm not going fishing, I'm going out to practice my casting...:D
     
  11. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    wow thats alot to do while casting.Ill be honest sometimes i feel like slinging the the whole thing in the lake lol,its very frustrating sometimes.But i love the reels and really want to learn how to cast good,im very serious about my catfishing.Ive been fishing all my life but i just started using baitcasters and fishing next to guys who can throw it 100 yrds without a birdnest makes me feel like a i just started fishing.But ill stick with it heck eventually im bound to get it right sooner or later, it looks like mybe later though lol.
     
  12. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    One other little fact that should be mentioned is the centrifical brake. When you disassemble your reel for cleaning, extra care needs to be taken that you do not loose the brakes components. These are two real, real, really, little parts that fit on the spool. (check out some schematics for the abu's). If you don't put them back on when you assemble the reel, you have lost your brake. Perhaps some other brother can describe them better or show a picture. I just know that as your spool rotates, these little things slide out to the end of the arms they are mounted on and applies slight pressure. This helps to stop the spool rotation. However, and again it must be emphasised, the important part of the cast is your thumb control. This is something you must master, and the only way to do it is by chunking some lead.
     
  13. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    The only other thing I might suggest is that you use 'maximum' mechanical braking. Tighten the spool cap under the star drag until the spool will not turn under the weight of the lure. Then tighten it a bit more. You don't want to crank it all the way down but you don't want the weight of the lure to cause the spool to turn. You may even bounce the weight up and down with the reel in freespool and tighten the cap until that barely allows the spool to turn. After that, make a cast aiming at something about 25 feet away. When the bait hits the ground, the spool should stop rather abruptly. As suggested earlier, this may not be the best thing under practical fishing conditions but it will better control the spool and prevent bird's nests.

    As you get more comfortable with how hard you have to cast and how the reel/spool is going to react to the strength of the cast, you can loosen the mechanical brake and apply more manual (thumb) pressure. Practice is the best teacher! You will get the hang of it in no time! I think you made excellent choices in reels as they are very smooth and durable. If you get so aggravated that you are going to throw them away, throw them my way! :happy: Just kidding! Hang in there Bro! It'll come to you. Practice practice practice!
     
  14. s_man

    s_man New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    south east ohio
    Brinley, lots of good stuff here. Start with the 6500 its smaller and easier to learn with. If you can, fill up the spool with some trilene big game 25 or 30 lb mono. (Its easier to unravel then the superlines.) Tighten the brake under the star drag until the one or 2 ounce sinker tied on the line will only fall 1 or 2 inches when you bounce the tip in freespool. Then make easy side arm casts don't try for distance. Your trying to get the feel of the spool spinning under your thumb. You should be barely touching the spool. Then try to cast further each time. after ten such casts you can loosen the brake little by little til basically you don't have it on at all.
     
  15. s_man

    s_man New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    south east ohio
    On your 7000's loosen the cap on the left till you see the rubber washer, then just finger tighten the cap under the star drag,I always crank it down and back it off and crank it down a couple times to make sure its seated good. Then you tighten the left side. This "centers" the spool in the reel, If you did it right you can't turn the right side forward any more but you can turn it backwards toward you its just not necessary. You should be using the left side cap for tightening and loosening the spool.Remember all this tightening is only with your fingers never use pliers on these caps they will bend easily and crush the threads then wont move any more. Just take it slow don't try to hit the far bank till you can cast 9 times outta ten without a nest. It'll come to you with practice. You will never be able to eliminate them completely everyone gets them from time to time. The best advice on that is as soon as you feel the line loosening and getting ready to backlash stop the spool with your thumb immeadiately. A small one is alot easier to get out than a big one. You can always reel back in and try it again.
     
  16. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    All good advice here.My thanks to everyone for there time and help,basicly i just have to keep playing with it until i get it right lol.Im probably going to be able to get out for a while sometime tommorow to fish so if i do ill let you know how i did.You guys are great,thanks for all the help and support.
     
  17. Davidsed505

    Davidsed505 New Member

    Messages:
    43
    State:
    Ohio
    I got a penn 500 jigmaster, and had a wonderful time trying to learn how to cast it. I don't have a boat, and need some casting distance, not 100 yards, but wanted 30-40yards with no hassle. I'm sure with years of practice, I could get the distance with no tinkering, (it seemed like, before I magged the reel, I'd get a decent cast twice in 10 casts...not consistent by any means). All I had to do was add one rare earth magnet, on a washer, glued close to the clicker ring, and naven't had a birdsnest with it since. The only major negative, with mine at least, is it works with a minimum of 4 oz sinker weight. If I go to a lighter sinker, I get no distance, or trying to force it, get overrun. Definitely worth looking into. If interested, pm me and I can get you the website for a hardware store that sells em. I bought enough supplies to mag 3 reels for 6 bucks + shipping. Yeah, I feel like I cheated, but I wanted consistency, and plucking out tangles ain't my idea of fun.