Baitcast help

Discussion in 'Fishing Reel Review' started by wiskeredwarrior101, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. wiskeredwarrior101

    wiskeredwarrior101 New Member

    Messages:
    70
    State:
    virginia
    Ok so ive been a serious spincast man here ever since i began fishing when i was four so i got 12 years under m y belt with them and im really comfertable with them but i see all the serious cat men are using baitcasters whats the upside to them im thinking about getting one since i got a flatbottom boat for my birthday need a nice new rod to go with it. so how do they work? whats the upside? how do you tune them? (i heard you have to "tune" them to get them to cast right or something) and anything else you think will help me. Thanks~nick
     
  2. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo
    baitcasters are the ultimate design. they can really crank the fish in. but they do not cast as far as other types untill you get good at it. it takes a while to get good with a baitcaster but its almost like learning an art form once you do. and ya you have to tune it depending on how much wight your throwing out and how far your trying to throw it.

    the best thing is to find someone who knows how to cast one show you in person. that way you wont get a billion birds nests before you figure it out.
     

  3. winston61

    winston61 New Member

    Messages:
    161
    State:
    Texas
    There is a sense of accomplishment that comes in mastering a bait caster. You must know your reel and how it will work with various line weights and baits. My Abu reels are like old friends and I know them inside and out. And you can really reel the fish in with them. You always win the argument. I've used spinners and now that I have used bait casters I don't think I will ever go back. Unless someone gives me a Shimano Baitrunner, then I will squeal like a little girl.
     
  4. xringer3

    xringer3 New Member

    Messages:
    950
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I still like my spinning reels in certain applications. However, for the bigger fish, and longer casting distances, I use the baitcaster. You can get more cranking power out of them, and they will cast farther when you master them.

    The tuning you hear about is pretty easy. Once you get the hang of casting without backlashing, then you can start tuning to get the max distance. On the ABUs, there are plenty of things to do. On the 7000 series reels, just take two of the brake blocks out (there are 4). If the reel has spool bushings, change them out to bearings. If it already has bearings, get the ceramic bearings.

    I've changed from stainless steel bearings in my 7000 and got another 20 yards with the same effort and nothing else. I took an old 6500C3, put in ceramic bearings and a C5 worm gear upgrade and got another 20 yards with it with only a 10ft meat hunter rod. The 7000 was on a 14ft lamiglas. I've tried a ceramic line pawl, but haven't noticed any difference in smoothness.

    I've heard everyone talk about the carbon matrix drags. I've got to get all my reels converted to them and don't think they're a bad idea. I"ve got one reel with them in it and they're great.

    It's a lot easier to work on a baitcaster also than a spinning reel. You can get the parts alot of places for very reasonable if you shop around. But, be careful. You'll end up like me. I've found a new hobby rebuilding and building from scratch, new reels, and now have more than I can use, lol.
     
  5. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo

    hahaha dang man thats the same reel I want!! I stopped using baitcasters when I stopped having money to buy them. when I used to bass fish and needed something I could thread a needle with baitcasters were al I used.
     
  6. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo
    wow Im just now starting to get brave enough to take my spinning reels apart. I sooooooo miss my baitcasters I used to have Im gonna go get me one pronto!!! of course I never had to take my bait casters apart before because they just didnt get the river funk in them like my spinning equipment does.

    I am a big fan of both but I just like spinning reels. JMO

    maybe its because Im cheap??? hahahaha
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    First of all, if you've been using only spincast reels, a big step up for you would be to open face spinning reels. I know that spincast reels have probably advanced in quality since I formed my opinion of them, but as soon as my grandkids graduate from a Snoopy rod, they graduate from a spincast reel. The closed face causes so much friction that long casting isn't possible; the drag system on every spincast I've ever owned (8-10) was wimpy, to be as nice as possible; and they hold just about enough line to cast across the yard. A good, large open face spinning reel overcomes all these problems, without having to learn to cast a revolving spool reel. With braided superline, 80# line will cast great on a larger open face spinning reel, and the good quality reels generally have good drag systems. I've got several, ranging from ultralight up to a 12' heavy duty spinning rod. So, I can tell you from experience that a good, heavy-duty open faced spinning reel/rod combo will handle just about any situation you're going to find yourself in. Nevertheless, most of my catfishing is done with revolving spool reels. Where I feel confident that I'm only going to catch smaller fish, say less than 20#, I'll use open face spinning tackle, but where I feel there's a definite possibility of a big one coming along, or when I have to really put the wood to one to keep it out of the snags, I want a revolving spool reel (probably Penn) with a stout rod with plenty of backbone. "Tuning" the reel involves adjusting it so that you don't get so many backlashes while "educating your thumb". With experience, you learn just how much thumb pressure to put on the spool, and exactly when to apply it while casting. When you learn this, you can pretty well back off the adjustments that keep you from backlashing, and also keep you from casting as far.
     
  8. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    you can make that baitcaster the love of your life once you learn to cast it. here's the trick. somewhere on that real is an adjustment for line drop. it's a friction adjustment that puts a little "drag" on the spool so it dont spin so freely. on an ambassaduer it's one of the spool caps. mine are older so thier on the left. the newer ones are on the right. all you have to do is. after you bait up. click the spool button so it's ready to cast. then tighten that knob until your bait wont fall free. then just loosen it till it falls free, but stops when the bait hits the ground. once you perfect this. you can cast that thing as hard as you can. and completely remove your hand from the spool and watch it peel line of and stop when it hits the water. still use your thumb though, and as time passes you'll find yourself using your thumb more and more, and loosening that knob so it'll really cast. i dont use mine much anymore. i just use it to take up all the side to side lash in the spool. then i stop.
     
  9. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    i forgot to mention. do this adjustment every time you change bait types,or weights.