BAIT DYING

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by buckmaster27012, Jul 5, 2009.

  1. buckmaster27012

    buckmaster27012 Member

    Messages:
    59
    State:
    Virginia
    :confused2:Got a 200 gal tank at the house I keep bait in. Got a 600 gph pump with a 5 gallon bucket filter with AMMO CARB, poly and a sponge filter. Also got 4 six inch air stones putting air in it. Bream are still dying, anybody got any suggestions on something else I could do. Checked on bait today and its got a strong odorl to it, may be from ones dying but hadnt had this problem before. Water temp is only about 70 degrees.
     
  2. boombalaty

    boombalaty New Member

    Messages:
    1,536
    State:
    Kansas
    I would test the water. Also check the temp of the water where you get your bait. If your tank is too far off the shock can kill them too.
     

  3. kooman

    kooman New Member

    Messages:
    135
    State:
    nebraska
    do you use any chemicals like better bait? they really do help
     
  4. KC Jayhawk 78

    KC Jayhawk 78 New Member

    Messages:
    3,236
    State:
    Kansas City, Ks
    Is it outside? 70 degrees seems ok. Ive got mine in the basement, and air conditioning gets down there, and it stays real cold down there. I have no problem at all. :big_smile:
     
  5. shortbus

    shortbus New Member

    Messages:
    459
    State:
    indiana
    Change the water out. When you put fish in a tank it puts alot of stress on them.When baitfish die in a tank they give off alot of nasty chemicals. If you see a fish dead in the tank get him out of the water asap.
     
  6. Iowa_Josh

    Iowa_Josh New Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    State:
    Central Iowa
    How long has the tank been set up? How many fish and how big?
     
  7. ncriverrat

    ncriverrat New Member

    Messages:
    333
    State:
    Trinity, NC
    yeah it may need a good scrubbing, once u get what i call death in the bucket its hard to keep em alive.:confused2:
     
  8. GrandpaGoneFishing

    GrandpaGoneFishing New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    Linn Valley, Ks
    Its been a few years since I kept fish in any numbers, but there are allot of different things that could be going wrong. If you got death tank you can use a bleach solution and scrub it out and start again.
    Regular water changes are a must and always refill with treated water. I also added a little unidolized ocean salt to the water also. there are other things you can add to the water to keep them calmer but I can't remember what they were. Potassium and a few other things. But I'd look that up. I had pretty good luck just putting in a thin layer of aquarium gravel on the bottom, Kept them a little calmer, they knew were the bottom was being a different color and texture.
    If your feeding your bait, Feeding less is always best. Most tanked fish die of ammonia in the water more from over feeding than over populations.
    the filtration sounds to be plenty, Just remember it takes a while to get it seeded for the quanity of fish. dumping a huge number of fish will require extra measures. Adding some kind of ammonia sorb and some extra activated carbon will help to.
    Some thing thats very important is acclimating the fish. you always want to equalize the temperature of there water and the tank water equalized slowly. 20 - 30 minutes depending on size of containers and such, maybe be more. then I always like to mix in some tank water into the container (a bag works great) approx. 20% every five minutes. then I'd turn em loose.
    Again water changes are a must but no more than 10%-20% at a time. don't want to shock them out. Basically thats the key.
    NEVER SHOCK THE FISH OUT! & KEEP AN EYE ON THE PH OF THE WATER!

    I've kept fish and made donuts not to mention I know a thing or two about beer.
    Guess thats why I think a Beer, Bait and donut store would be a million Idea in the right place.
    If it wouldn't cut into my fishing time
    :doubt:​
     
  9. GrandpaGoneFishing

    GrandpaGoneFishing New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    Linn Valley, Ks
    After looking. you might have the flow to heavy. they need a place to rest. Areation is great but the fish need a place to rest. your should be getting plenty of aireation with the filter depending on how its set up. Rather than setting the air bubblers all across the tank. Try putting it on one side and just making it a smooth slow flow. Creating max oxygen and still leaving a place were the fish can rest.
     
  10. buckmaster27012

    buckmaster27012 Member

    Messages:
    59
    State:
    Virginia
    Tank has been setup probably about a month or so. Kept bait first time pretty good, some lasted over two weeks. This time had about 25-30 3 to 4 inch bream in it. It may just need a regular water change, may try changing about 25% of the water each week. I'm going to check PH of water to when I get a chance. What does everybody use to change PH levels for large amounts of water like 200 gallons or so. What does everybody think of the AMMO CARB, I used this and thought it was working but dont know if its helping now or not. Thanks
     
  11. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    Jay is absolutely right. Herring/shad are schooling fish that move all the time but bream don't and don't like constant flow. A trick I do is use Pvc pipe cut into 4 or 5 inch pieces. I just set them in the bottom of my tank and the bream love to hide in it to get away. I'm not certain this is your problem but I think it's overlooked problem in some bream tanks. 70f is a good temp, mine are running close to 74F at the crack of dawn and almost 80F at the end of the day from the heat. The lake is around 83F so keeping them colder would only shock/kill them as soon as they hit the water.
     
  12. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,694
    State:
    arkansas
    Name:
    johnnie
    keeping bait in a tank is just like keeping tropical fish in the house.the biggest killer of fish in a tank is amonia and nitrates.get yourself 2 test kits one for each and check it dayly.if water in test sample turns green or yellow its time for a 1/3rd water change.you can use plain old baking soda to lower the ph of your water.put in a table spoon and check do this till water in test sample turns blue.feed your fish very litte your trying to keep them alive not fatten them up.
     
  13. Iowa_Josh

    Iowa_Josh New Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    State:
    Central Iowa
    That number of fish should not be a problem. I put that many in my 50 gal with an aquarium filter. I don't feed them but they are still good for weeks. Eventually they get real skinny and it's time to get rid of them.

    If you went to the work of making a filter, don't change the water. It defeats the purpose of the bacteria filter and it can actually hurt the bacteria because you're adding chlorine and/or other chemicals. You shouldn't need charcoal either, the bacteria should take care of ALL of the fish waste problems. The charcoal can mess up the bacteria too, so I've read.

    If you have hard water, you've got no problems with ph. If you've got real soft water your ph can actually drop when you've got fish in the tank and it can kill em. Baking soda raises ph, btw. A little salt certainly isn't a bad thing. I've found it most helpful for fish that get fungus type stuff.

    Don't rinse out the filter and change water at the same time. It wipes out too many good bacteria. And don't get soap near your tank. Instant death to fish and all that.

    You don't need bubblers if you have good flow through your filter. Bubbles have no special effect. They just stir the water. A little bit of movement on the top is all you need unless it gets real hot or you're overcrowding the fish.
     
  14. buckmaster27012

    buckmaster27012 Member

    Messages:
    59
    State:
    Virginia
    I'm going to take the AMMO CARB out of the filter and just have the poly and a sponge filter in my filter and see how it may work. I add salt to the tank about everytime that I change the water out but that is about it. About 1 cup per 50 gal of water. I'm going to get to PH test kit this weekend and check it and see what I got. I took all my bait I had left out for now and put them back in the creek, but will be adding some more bait this week once I make some changes. If Ph is high what is a suggestion for lowering PH level. Thanks
     
  15. drpepper

    drpepper New Member

    Messages:
    6,133
    State:
    Indiana
  16. Lignum

    Lignum New Member

    Messages:
    105
    State:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    I too have a 200 gallon bait tank and the only fish that I lose are bullheads, and occaisionally some bream. The bream die on me, die for reasons I cant explain. I have had some bluegills in my bait tank for a couple of months now that have showed no sign of stress, matter of fact they are healthy as the day I first hooked them. We caught some gills a while back, and all but a few have died from that last catch. Beats me...


    The only thing I add to my bait tank is some salt, ( non iodized rock salt ), and some pond dechlorinater at water changes.
     
  17. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,447
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Dustin,
    Read up on "The aquarium nitrogen cycle"
    You will see that if you rely on a biological filter you MUST do partial water changes to remove nitrates. NITRATES ARE POISONOUS TO FISH
    You MUST pre treat that water to remove the clorine and other harmful chemicals.
    Also, you have to understand something that a lot of guys don't realize:
    SOMETIMES YOU HAVE TO ADD AMMONIA TO YOUR BAIT TANK.
    Yes, you read it right, add ammonia!!!! so stop laughing and read on....

    Those bacteria you rely on to remove the ammonia do so by eating it. The more fish, the more ammonia. The more ammonia, the more bacteria there will be.
    What do you think happens if you leave the tank without fish in it for a week or more? The ammonia runs out and the bacteria START TO DIE!!!
    Then, when you add a whole bunch of bait there is an ammonia spike and the bait dies because there isn't enough bacteria to take care of business. But you must do water changes because the other side of the coin is that if you don't change the water enough the nitrates will kill them if the ammonia doesn't
    It's all about balance. Do what Johnny suggested, get an ammonia and a nitrate test kit and just keep the water in good shape. Feed the bacteria when there is no bait in the tank and get the nitrates down by partial water changes just before you put the bait in.

    Keeping good bait isn't rocket science but there are a few simple rules that ensure success. There are guys who have no trouble keeping good bait who have never heard of the nitrogen cyle or nitrates or any of it but I guarantee they are following those few simple rules somehow whether they know it or not...W
     
  18. hock_paul

    hock_paul New Member

    Messages:
    246
    State:
    illinois
    Get a large rock from a the creek or lake that you caught the fish in(one that's been submerged for quite some time). Throw it in your tank, and let it sit for a few days or a week before you put bait in it. The reason being is that for long term bait storage, the water needs certain good bacteria to eat the amonia and other bad bacteria that are killing off your fish. The rock will introduce these bacteria to your tank, therefore helping your fish thrive. GoodLUCK!
     
  19. Iowa_Josh

    Iowa_Josh New Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    State:
    Central Iowa
    If you have good enough filter and a reasonable amount of water per fish, you don't have to do water changes at all.
     
  20. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,447
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Wrong, wrong, wrong.....sorry Josh, but just wrong...W