Bait bucket for the truck

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Clovis, May 31, 2007.

  1. Clovis

    Clovis New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    Paris Tennessee
    After doing some searching on this site I finally decided on a design for a bait bucket to build. It is based on the design in this thread http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=16308

    I cut my lid off center so the opening would be bigger, and I also left a corner on it to mount the pump through, and I am going to cut some slots in it to hold a knife when useing the bait as cut.

    I piped my plumbing in throught the side of the bucket instead of the top. I think I did this in a way that will allow me to put the whole thing into the bottom of a barrel and insulate it in the future.

    I also wired it to a plug the goes into my trailer light harness for power.

    I like it, but wanted some opinions as to ways to improve it further.

    Thanks,
    Steve
     
  2. Clovis

    Clovis New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    Paris Tennessee
    Also, with the water coming in through the side and set just right, I get a little circular current flow in the bucket. Here are some pictures.
     

    Attached Files:


  3. Clovis

    Clovis New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    Paris Tennessee
    And a couple more pics
     

    Attached Files:

  4. SubnetZero

    SubnetZero New Member

    Messages:
    1,619
    State:
    Sherman IL
    Great JOB!!!! Should work out nicely for ya and sure beats the + $300 for a commercial one :cool2:
     
  5. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Looks nice, you certainly worked hard on it.

    Bluegill, bullheads, minnows, goldfish, etc. should last for days in a tank like that, but shad won't make it very long.

    For shad, it's not enough to just keep the water moving and keep it aerated; you need to find a way to filter scales and slime from the water. If you can figure out a way to add a filter, you'll really have a good tank.

    There's a reason the expensive bait tanks are expensive...
     
  6. SubnetZero

    SubnetZero New Member

    Messages:
    1,619
    State:
    Sherman IL
    Not sure what you mean by "very long", but Ive had shad and shad + google eye/blue gills in mine for 8-10 hours with no problems....
     
  7. crab

    crab New Member

    Messages:
    1,055
    State:
    Ironton,Ohio
    nice rig you got there.
     
  8. Clovis

    Clovis New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    Paris Tennessee
    Yeah, Shad go straight into the ice chest.

    I have a strainer in the bottom of the tank, you can see it in the last photo, just to keep stuff from sucking into the pump.

    This is just a first revision. Iam going to build a 300 gal tank at the house for longer term bait holding and this is just a small scale prototype. I will be filtering the house tank though.

    I'll post when I start on it in a new thread.
     
  9. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    is it possible to use sand to filter a larger operation such as a 300-500 gal tank?
    i was thinking of pumping water into top of sand trap and then out of the bottom of it.
     
  10. Clovis

    Clovis New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    Paris Tennessee
    Sand should filter out any solid waste, but I don't think it would do anything for the chemical waste (ammonia) for that you would need a bio filter of some sort(one type of bacteria turns the ammonia into some other harmful substance that another bacteria turns into an unharmful substance, nitrate, and nitrite, but I don't remember which is which) I read on here somewhere were someone was useing, or going to use, one of those above ground pool pumps. This is the route I am thinking of taking.
     
  11. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    For your big bait tank, you need to be thinking more "aquarium" than "bait tank" - do some online research regarding home-built fitration systems for big aquariums and that's the sort of thing you need for your big bait tank.

    Be aware also that it takes weeks -- not hours -- for the population of beneficial bacteria (the "bio filter") to grow large enough to handle any significant load from the fish in the tank. Put too many fish in the tank too quickly and you'll overwhelm the bacteria (more ammonia than they can eat) and end up killing the fish. This can be counteracted by monitoring water quality (ammonia levels specifically) and doing partial water changes on a daily basis until the biofilter is established. A lack of patience is a major contributing factor to the failure of newly established aquariums of any size...
     
  12. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    If I'm not mistaken, you've only used your tank for the last few months, during which time you've benefitted from cool or cold water temps. Anybody can keep shad alive when the water temp is in 50's or 60's.

    But once the water warms up into the 80's, I'd truly be amazed if you could keep shad alive in your tank for more than 3 or 4 hours, unless you're constantly supplying fresh, cool water to the tank.

    It's difficult to keep shad alive during the summer, even in the high-dollar tanks. But those tanks are more suited to the task, since they have good insulation and a good filtration/aeration system.

    You can improve your success rate with shad in warmer weather by cooling the bait tank water to about 10 or 15 degrees less than the ambient water temperature -- any more than that and you'll shock the fish and they'll die (the clue to cold shock is that their entire heads turn rosy red, not just the noses). I use either bagged ice (with chlorine remover added) or frozen 2-liter bottles of water to cool the bait tank water.

    I have easily kept shad for a 36 to 48 hours in the heat of summer in my Grayline tank. I recently switched to a Creek Bank tank and expect to be able to keep shad even longer, as it has a better filtration system and more insulation.
     
  13. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    Very Nice Nice Idea!
     
  14. SubnetZero

    SubnetZero New Member

    Messages:
    1,619
    State:
    Sherman IL
    Actually, I built it last year and used it all last summer.. Works great..
    I do change out the water on the fly (one of the reasons on why I designed it the the way I did) after a few hours. I didn't want to fill it with the garden hose and then have to put chemicals in it like alot of the commercial tanks. Also, Alot of them do NOT have a pump out, so you have to pull the "end of day" plug and let it drain out in your boat (Bleh).. Mine I can fill out on the water (my hose is long enough to go underneath the boat), Drain back into lake when finished and change out the water all by just turning the valves :big_smile:. Those Commercial Tanks are nice, but I just don't wanna spend the $300 - $500 for one when I know I can build one for less than $75...

    I appreciate what you say though. Has got me to thinking (That and I can't leave well enough alone hehe) ... I think I'm going to design and build a venturi system for it and I may go ahead and design a filter for it as well. I'll post my results....