Back in time burning wood

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by JERMSQUIRM, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    well as time goes forward im going back. the cost of fuel soars up and up. im cutting back.

    in 05 i made my shed into an insulated shop where i can tinker around and hang out so to speak. i was burning K-1 kerosene in there to keep warm. well after a few months of payiny $3.89 a gallon, and topped with my usual winter lay off the old unemployment doesn't need to be wasted on far to expensive fuel.

    well after a few weeks of my complaining, a friend told me another buddies dad had a wood stove he was wanting to sell. so for $40 and about $70 in pipe i took care of that problem.

    and then was able to keep it warmer,cook over it and get free fuel. talking about paying for its self. so i began thinking this year and shopping this summer.

    i now have a wood burning ul approved air tight fireplace/stove in the home. it was costing around $700 a year to heat my 2 bedroom home. this burner witch it a safe one, no sparks can get out of it was $399.00 and about $300.00 in stainless steel chimney has been heating my house all winter so far. my furnace never runs. we stoke it full at night and its still full of coals in the morn. on adverage my living room is 80 and the rest of the house is 70's.
     
  2. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    so spending one years fuel cost i can do without thier fuel witch is getting ready to go up 30-40%. and have a nice coazy fire i can see.

    and we got a nice lil rack for the wood in the house and a big stock in the alley behind the shop. with this years ice storm that smashed through the mid-central states i got truck load after truck load.

    got me a new chainsaw this year and wood has been easy to find+good excersize and spare time filler. and my buddies dad has a splitter he built 15 years ago with spare parts. great one. 4 ton ram with elect start. hes a machanic for altorfer/catipiller. ag side of it.

    any one else burn wood?
     

  3. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    I'm with you 100% bro...wood heat rules.

    You might want to put a pan of water on top of the stove. It keeps the humidity at a more comfortable level, and if you like good smellin' stuff, drop a few cloves or some rosemary in it.
     
  4. 1sporticus

    1sporticus Active Member

    Messages:
    1,006
    State:
    Iowa
    I used to heat with wood when I lived on the farm, I loved it. When I moved to town I bought a house that doesn't have any chimney's, and I could have put one in but the insurance company wouldn't go for it. Before I was crippled, I installed fireplace inserts, gas and wood. We put in a lot of them before the millenium change over. The new stoves are the cats meow. However I am considering a corn stove, I like the idea of being able to use a clean fuel, and if you get hungry, just cook some up.LOL
    I do miss the warmth of a wood stove, and if you put some fruit tree logs in there you'll like it. Later Andy
     
  5. Ol Man

    Ol Man New Member

    Messages:
    3,170
    State:
    Illinois
    Be sure to take a good close look at your homeowners insurance...

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    An expert is a man that has made all mistakes possible in a narrow field of expertise (Albert Einstein)
     
  6. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    I've been heating with wood for 27 years. I built my own wood stove in 1980 and now it is heating my 10 room house. I've been re-modeling this old house I bought in 1996. The first year I put in a new propane heat system. The fuel cost $1800 the first year! That convinced me to insulate the attic, and room by room I've been insulating the walls, replacing the windows, repairing the doors, etc. Last year I paid about $300-$400 for propane. There are two stairways in the house so the heat from the one wood stove down stairs heats the whole place. With 2.5 million acres of National Forest and several friends with big farms, I'll never run out of free wood.
     
  7. jsk30

    jsk30 New Member

    Messages:
    232
    State:
    NC
    no heat feels like wood heat.thanks for sharing
     
  8. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,010
    State:
    TN
    Is there still a long waiting list for the corn stoves? There was a couple years ago. I remember seeing them at a Flower show I attend quite frequently. They are pretty cool items to own.

    Take care.
    Cheryl
     
  9. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    I agree WOOD RULES. When we first bought these 17 acres, it had about 7 acres of woods. I knew I would never run out of wood, as long as I get off my lazy butt and cut it. We have two wood stoves in our house. And Allstate Homeowners approved them both. They just took pictures of them to see they were safe. Allstate is a good outfit.

    Just outside of LaPorte, Indiana is a pallet making place, that sets all their wood scraps outside its gate for people to pick up. FREE. Nice cutoffs of oak and pine and some woods I'm not sure of. Hey it burns great, it's free, and they thank you for taking it. It does not get any better than that. People stop with cars and boxes in their trunks, and with pick up trucks. If you do some looking in your local communitys, you will find all kinds of free wood. Lot's of places through out there pallets, and you can cut them up with just a Skill saw --- no chain saw needed. And don't forget those ashes are great on the garden and around the flowers. Bulbs and potatoes love that potash.

    There is also something to be said of the smell of burning wood. Every wood has it's own distink smell, and I think I love them all. I'm burning Black Walnut now and it smells good. Some of those cedars smell like incence burning.

    Hey I'm old school as I grew up burning wood and coal. I love the smell of coal burning too. We used to go to the steam shows, and what made those old Rumleys and steam engines great was the smell of that coal burning. Now the dummies have went to propane burners and all the great memorys are gone. Propane does not smell. And they say that is progress --- BS.

    Another nice thing is some of the new stoves have big glass doors so you can watch the fire. Hey there is nothing wrong with snuggling up with the wife and just watching the fire. You don't get the same affect if you go in the basement and watch the gas furnace. My wife would have me locked up if I suggested that. lol lol

    Burning wood has more advantages than just heat. The BSin and enjoyment of someone elses company, when you are cutting, splitting, and stacking. Even me and the wife enjoy the conversation when working together. Sometimes with busy scheudules thats the only time we get to enjoy ones company.

    So the moral of the story is Burnning Wood can improve your love life, create more friends, and save you money. LOL It does not get any better than that.

    :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  10. FishBrew

    FishBrew New Member

    Messages:
    329
    State:
    North Texas
    my mom, dad, and brother all have wood buring stoves. I love them but heed the Ole Man's advice ... check with your insurance. Your cost of fuel will look real cheap if you find out to late you don't have insurance.
    Remember, the insurance could deny a claim not because you installed it, but simply because you did not inform them. Even if allowed, don't be shocked if they raise your rate (at least you will be covered).
     
  11. Hope

    Hope New Member

    Messages:
    1,177
    State:
    Oklahoma
    We just have a fireplace, but use it alot because our heat is electric.

    Lately though, I've been wondering if it doesn't bother our son's breathing, cuz he seems to wake up with a headache after we've burned wood overnight. We run those ionic breeze air cleaners in the house, but you can't keep them on while the fireplace is burning, so... maybe just make smaller fires. Chimney is clean, I know that, but on a windy day, a certain amount of smoke does tend to blow back down and into the room. Also, there's a floor vent very near the fireplace, and if the furnace kicks on while the wood's burning, that seems to draw the smoke out.

    Anyhow, a very sweet man we met while fishing the other day just happened to have a pickup load of cut oak, planed into rough boards, that he'd gotten from a neighbor. My husband gave him the flatheads he caught to stock this neighbor's pond and then he offered us the wood!
    Burns great... hot and long. Cedar or birch are my favorite smelling wood, but they're all nice. Love to hear that fire crackling :lol:

    Hope y'all have a great day!
     
  12. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    I don't know much about them but I've been in two homes that were heated with wood furnaces that are were outside the home. The heat was controlled by thermostat and ducked to each room so the entire house was even temperature. They also provide all the homes hot water in the winter time. I would think they are much safer, wouldn't effect insurance and keep all the smoke outside. Great about ALL smoke staying outside but I missed the smell of wood burning.

    We have a wood burning fireplace that doesn't let smoke into the house for it has sealed glass doors. It has a vent inside the fireplace that pulls combustion air from outside the house. Most fireplaces have to pull air from inside the house for combustion therefore create cold spots. Ours works great, will heat the whole house. But to be 100% smoke free the glass doors must remain closed and if you wish to see the fire they have to be cleaned daily. Also they are very hard to clean! And with the doors closed their is no nice smell from the wood. So now we have a gas log and mostly heat with the gas furnace.
     
  13. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Jesus! burning rough cut oak? I'm sitting here thinking how many boat plans are requiring typically white oak for framing and the cost of it.:angry:

    Olefin, I have to find a heat source for the barn and a cooling source.
    Being that it is several rooms and levels I dont want to stick a wood stove in a corner and call it heated. Like you said the heat is uneven. I'm thinking about the heated water systems with the heat exchangers and thermostats. I've hear of people selling the whole set ups used for 500-1000 bucks.

    Another thing that I dont like about a wood stove at the barn is things in barns like gas and chemicals that are flammable. All it takes is the fumes to ignite. The other thing about heating with kerosene or wood is the soot and residue. It would ruin any painting I happened to be doing on a boat. Some of those boat paints are 500 bucks a gallon and highly flammable.
     
  14. 1sporticus

    1sporticus Active Member

    Messages:
    1,006
    State:
    Iowa
    I had a friend who had one of those outside furnace setups. He heated his house and 30x40 barn with it. The barn was insulated very well and the house was a modular 2 years old. He had a wood hot water furnace, and hanging radiators is what I'd call them, with blowers and everything was thermostat controlled. All of the wood mess was outside, he even ran the water lines under his concrete sidewalk, and never had to clean ice or snow off of it. One thing I really liked, was he bought an old grain bin for 75.00, and set it up next to the stove, and had his wood in it. A nice setup, and well thought out. Later Andy
     
  15. pythonjohn

    pythonjohn New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    11,533
    State:
    F L A Swamps
    I have a regular brick fire place in my house,Its nice and pretty and burns a nice size fire..
    My question is how do you make these things put out more heat without rebuilding the whole fireplace???
    Anybody got any suggestions?
     
  16. PeZ

    PeZ New Member

    Messages:
    757
    State:
    Oklahoma
    put a blower on it
     
  17. 1sporticus

    1sporticus Active Member

    Messages:
    1,006
    State:
    Iowa
    Hey pythonjohn, you can get fireplace inserts that are very efficient, and good looking. You can get them set up with all the bells and whistles, and they are not hard to install.
    Later Andy
     
  18. punkin570

    punkin570 New Member

    Messages:
    2,015
    State:
    MS
    we were brought up usin wood stove to heat and cook on, gathering firewood for ourselves and my grandparents and i have stacked wood from woodpile to porch by wheelbarrow with snow on ground many times...there is nothin like it, best heat source ever in my opinion. I agree that with the prices of gas and such, its outrageous. We personally have stopped usin the furnace and got a 5 brick infared propane space heater with thermostat, topped off our 250 gallon tank this summer and havent filled it up again yet. The heater has really paid for itself so far. There is one item i would like to ask about that no one has mentioned, and since i really havent researched it yet, i have no idea how it stands with price. What i want to know about is Solar Heating...ya know, using solar panels for saving on the electric/heating bills. To me it looks like using the solar energy we already have to cut back on the amt of elec and fuel we use would save a lot. but it may just my thinkin. Does anyone know very much about this? I would be interested in their point of view.
     
  19. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Hope, you are on to something...I spend two weeks in deer camp every year, and the woodsmoke works my sinuses over. In our home we use an airtight Jotul, and there's never been a problem.

    Olefin, take a damp paper towel, dip it in ashes, and it will clean your glass pretty easily.

    Punkin, the big drawback to a solar system is the cost of batteries (in the thousands of $), which have to be replaced eventually.
     
  20. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    Hope,,,, you need to get a carbon monoxide detector. Headaches are the first sign of carbon monoxide poisening.

    Your chimney needs a good draft to keep carbon monoxide from becomming a real deadly problem.

    If your fire place has a bad draft, 9 times out of ten, your chimney is not high enough. Chimneys need to be at least a couple feet above the peak of the house. And some times if the house is in a low spot, they might need to be higher to get a good draft.

    Check into that carbon monoxide detector, as it is a gas you cannot see or smell. Another sign of poisening is feeling giddy, like you have had a glass of wine or so.

    I used to work on a blast furnance at Bethlehem Steel, and we went to school every year to reassociate ourselves with it. Safety was the main theme. Some areas of the blastfurnace have so much gas, we had to carry our own air on our backs.

    Used to be over 200 parts per million and you had to leave an area immediatly. And then they had a scale that said how many hours you could work in a 24 hour period is certian amounts of gas.

    Get that detector.

    You don't want to wake up dead. Some people are more sensetive to gas than others. Smokers don't feel the affects as much as non smokers. Kids are more sensetive than adults.

    :eek:oooh: :eek:oooh: