Attaching leaders to juglines?

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Bubbatn, Aug 17, 2007.

  1. Bubbatn

    Bubbatn New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    Tennessee
    Hi guys, I'm new to the site. I've been planning a fishing trip this week and we're going tonight. I just got the thought yesterday that i'd like to try to put out some jugs too. I'm going today to get a noodle and pvc pipe and i've read on how to hook everything up. This is my first time using jugs, so i'm only gonna put out maybe 5 or so just to get the feel for it until I have more time to "fine-tune" some better more efficient rigs.

    The only thing i'm wondering about now is that i'm not quite sure what the depth of the water is we'll be fishing at tonight. I was just curious what the easiest way to attach my leaders onto my main line after I figure out what depth I need to set everything at? I tried searching, but couldnt quite seem to find my answer. I'm probably gonna be using a high test mono for the leaders. Is there a knot I can use to tie them onto my main line after we get on the water that wont be too much hassle? It seems most people use dropper loops in their main lines, but again...i'm not quite sure what depth i'll need to be at and at the moment, I kinda would like a quicker way than tieing multiple loops all the way down my main lines(again....lack of planning ahead of time).

    I'd appreciate it if anyone could help me out.
     
  2. TDawgNOk

    TDawgNOk Gathering Monitor (Instigator)

    Messages:
    3,365
    State:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    quick and easy way is to tie your dropper leaders as a loop. Then you can slip 1 end through the loop on the main line, push the hook through that loop, and pull tight. Quick, and no actual knot to mess with.

    Also check out the following BOC sponsor for some of the best clips to clip that leader onto the main line EZ Clip
     

  3. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I have the same problem with my anchored juglines; I never know the depth I'll be setting them out in. I have them rigged with 75' of line with dropper loops tied in the mainline every 36". I prefer to use 100# test nylon line for my mainline; I've never had a cat break it, but I can break it off if I get hung up.
     
  4. jlingle

    jlingle New Member

    Messages:
    1,036
    State:
    Altus, Okl
    Dustin, please save yourself some heartache and don't use the mono for your droppers. We use the tarred twisted nylon line & we've had pretty darn good luck with it so far.

    If you are only gonna set out about 5 or so jugs, go to Wal Mart and get some trotline clips. That way, all you have to do is tie knots in your mainline about 1/2" apart wherever you want your dropper to be. Your dropper is attached to the clips, so you just clip it right on your mainline. No hassle, and you don't have to leave your dropper lines (and sharp hooks) attached to your noodles when you take them up.

    Have a good time.

    BTW, there is a sponsor here on the BOC that sells trotline clips.... I was just trying to account for your needing them pretty darn quick... like today. Support our sponsors whenever possible, they help keep the lights on in this joint.
     
  5. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Dustin, in my opinion, Jtrew is one of the most knowledgeable jug fisherman on the board. What he says goes a long, long ways with the way I fish. The only thing he has recommended that I just can't (or should I say "won't") do is to use two liter bottles. I saw the ones Chris Glass has made up, and they were some extremely well made jugs...but when I tried it, I couldn't get paint to stick to the inside of the jug...so I went back to my noodles. I use trotline stagings as my drops, and use a trotline clip to fasten them to the main line. If you have several hooks on a jug and do catch a big fish on one of the lower hooks, you stand a good chance of winding up on the business end of the higher hooks if the big one makes a strong run. By using trotline clips, you can take the hooks off as you come to them, fairly well eliminating the chance you will be the one caught. I also have several different weights made up for my jug lines. I can fish it with just a few ounces, a pound or a couple of pounds...depends on whats happening with the fish.
     
  6. Bubbatn

    Bubbatn New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    Tennessee
    Thanks for all the tips guys. I really appreciate it.



    Do you use the same size twine as your main line? What size do most people use for their main line and droppers?
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Ok, several things to cover. First, I only have one single problem with noodles, and that it their visibility at 1/2 or 3/4 of a mile, even with binoculars. For visibility, I even tried using 3-liter jugs; they were more visible, but just too bulky for my taste. Being able to stick the hooks into the foam of a noodle is so handy, I made a modification to my jugs. I cut a 1" slice of noodle, make the center hole a little larger, then glue it onto the cap of the jug. Really cuts down on tangles.

    On my freefloating juglines, I have the top hook 3' below the jug; another hook 3' below that; another hook 3' below that; and the bottom hook 3' below that, which means that my bottom hook is 12' below the jug, with hooks every 3' between. I attach a 16p or 20' nail for a weight about a foot below the bottom hook. The nail is cheap and doesn't seem to hang up as badly as a regular sinker. I use 100# twisted nylon line, and make my droppers about 4" long by using a 'double overhand' or 'surgeons' knot. I use 5/0 (usually) big-eye trotline hooks so that I can attach them by simply sticking the end of the loop through the eye, then bringing the hook through the loop. That way, if a hook gets messed up while fishing, I can quickly replace it without any cutting or tieing. To store the line, I wind it clockwise around the neck of the jug. Yes, it makes a difference which way you wind it. I hold the wound-on line place while dropping the nail inside the jug and screwing on the cap. As you screw on the cap, you can see that it's pulling the jugline tight, so it won't come loose and get all snarled. Wind the line backward and you loosen the line as you screw on the cap.

    Anchored jugs present a little different problem. As mentioned before, you seldom know till you look on your depthfinder just how deep the water's going to be where you set out your jug, so putting hooks on ahead of time is not only impossible, but downright dangerous. And pulling in a big bunch of line with hooks attached is plumb foolhardy. So, you want to be able to quickly and easily attach your hooks, and the best way I know of is to put small dropper loops whereever you might want to put a hook, then attach a short leader and a trotline clip as you put out your jugline; remove them as you pull it in, or a big ol' cat might make a sudden run and jerk some of those hooks into you. (Man hooks catfish---catfish hooks man!) Personally, I make my dropper loops 3' apart, just like my freefloating juglines, but I may or may not put hooks on every dropper. For an anchor, you've got two choices. Either make the weight so heavy it's impossible for a cat to move it, or use a weight that your jug will float if a cat takes it to deeper water. For instance, my jugs will support about 4#, so I use a 2# weight; if I used a 5# weight, a cat could take my jug to deeper water, and it would sink out of sight--gone forever. I use the same line for my anchored jugs as for my freefloating jugs. I store the line by winding it around the neck of the jug, and larger line is just too bulky. You shouldn't have that problem if you're using noodles, though, so you could use a larger, thicker line which might be a little easier on your hands when pulling in your line.

    I don't paint my jugs on the inside; I paint them on the outside, generally using a $.97 can of yellow spray paint from Wally World. If I'm careful, I can paint a full set of 20 with a single can. I don't paint the inside of the jug because I put about 3 ounces of small clean gravel, bits of lead, or something like that inside each jug. When a fish hits and tips the jug on end, the gravel slides down into the neck of the jug and that keeps it in a tipped position, letting me know I need to check that jug.
     
  8. jedt

    jedt New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    Cameron,Texas
    I'venever had a problem with pulling in jugs with several hooks attached, however I have seen a 25lber take those trotline clips all the way to the bottom. The main thing is the person working the line to know if one is hung or a big fish is on who is not tired to let the line go. I'll enclose a couple of pics that i posted in the Texas section to show the simplest and best method tried by at least 10 different people who have all caught big fish.

    Well it would not let me so you have to go to white pool fishing noodles in the Texas local talk.
     
  9. Bubbatn

    Bubbatn New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    Tennessee
    Thanks again for the tips guys.

    Well, I had no luck on my first jug fishing attempt. Although we didnt do any good with rod n' reels either. They just werent biting where we were at. I ended up trying just 4 jugs. I just tied the droppers directly off the main line. I'm gonna try to get some noodles and make up my own and pre-rig them where they'll be alot easier to deal with next time.

    I'm gonna spend some time within the next couple weeks and work up me some new jugs that are a little better, efficiency wise. I'm liking the design of the one in the members library labeled "Ryno's Noodle Jugs".

    One question I did have. Do you guys make sure all your slack is out of the line where the jug meets the water on anchored jugs? Or how much slack do you leave if any?
     
  10. porboy

    porboy New Member

    Messages:
    629
    State:
    TX Panhand
    Gerard,
    Went over to the Texas board and looked at your pictures. They look good. I'll make up a few and see how they work for me. Thanks for the info. What size snap swivels and hooks do you use?
    Bill