Asian Carp Observation

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by Mr.T, Sep 19, 2006.

  1. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

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    2,553
    State:
    MO
    I think I'm starting to understand why those damned carp are taking over the rivers.

    Last week I had one jump in the boat and cut him up for bait. But I accidentally got into the gut cavity, where I was amazed to find thousands of eggs -- apparently the asian carp don't just spawn once a year like most native fishes; if they're carrying eggs in the middle of September, it's reasonable to think they spawn all year around or at least as long as the water is in a certain temperature range. Many tropical fish kept in home aquariums are the same way -- if the conditions are right, they'll spawn every few weeks all year around. I've haven't done any research on the spawnnig habits of asian carp, so I'm just guessing based on my personal observation.

    There's no way for the native fish to compete against that, and I can't imagine there's anything we humans can do to slow or stop the spread of those things short of inventing some kind of genetic "poison" that stops them from reproducing. Kind of makes for a bleak outlook.
     
  2. crazy

    crazy New Member

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    2,090
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    Kansas CIty, MO
    It's said that they spawn every time the water rises and drops. My guess is that they don't do this in the winter time.....
     

  3. just cats

    just cats New Member

    Messages:
    325
    State:
    Leslie Missouri
    I've seen the same thing here, but I have noticed that there are a lot less of them with eggs now than there were a couple months ago. I don't know hardly anything about these carp but I don't know of any other fish that spawns when the water temps are down much at all. I can't imagine the eggs hatching in water below 60 degrees but like I said I don't know much about these invaders. I am concerned how they will affect the fisheries around the country. From what I hear on TV and read on the BOC they seem to be all over the country and spreading like wild fire. I can't think of anyway to control them that wouldn't harm the other fish. I talked to FWS a few weeks back at the ramp and they said they have no plans or ideas about controlling them. They said kill everyone you can , I said I already do. That won't even make a dent, not even if we all kill em. So I am hoping that mother nature steps in and does something, it's possible. That is about our only hope at stopping or at least slowing these things down I think.
     
  4. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    SPAWNING:
    Male carp mature at 2 years of age; females at 3 year of age. In temperate regions they spawn once a year, in the spring when water temperatures are at 64-68 degrees Fahrenheit. They can spawn 5 to 6 times per year in the tropics. The female releases adhesive eggs that are fertilized by male and attach to vegetation. In culture, hand stripping, tank spawning, and pond spawning can be successfully employed.


    This information was found online and are results for Japan. On another site it said that carp spawn when the waters are moving rapidily. The female can lay 750,000 eggs in the wild and 1,000,000 in a controled environment/farm
     
  5. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

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    From http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-SPECIES/2006/September/Day-05/e7416.htm:
    So I think they behave differently here in the US than in Asia, though they probably don't spawn "continuously" as I suggested.
     
  6. Bigbluefisherman

    Bigbluefisherman New Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    State:
    Missouri
    I have heard the same about the Asian carp....they spawn every time the river goes up and then back down! I don't know whats true, but I do know there are millions of them around here and it could be possible!
     
  7. poopdeck [patrick]

    poopdeck [patrick] New Member

    Messages:
    1,215
    State:
    ofallon il
    It looks like we are stuck with them forever and they seem to breed a lot more than the euorpean carps which I believe were brought here in the 1860/s