Are your flathead catfish migratory?

Discussion in 'Flathead Catfish' started by Catcaller, Nov 24, 2007.

Do your local Flathead tend to migrate to spawn or to wintering holes?

  1. They migrate long distances every year

  2. They do not migrate, and are present year round

  3. They migrate short distances within the lake

  4. Never Noticed

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  1. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    The flatheads I catch here in Se Kansas on the Neosho river migrate upstream every year to spawn from down south in Grand Lake, Oklahoma.

    There are flathead that stay here locally year round...but the vast majority of yellers get caught up at our local low water dam during the spring as they push upstream.

    It is the first impassable obstacle they run into from the lake...and they concentrate big time from late April...through May and June...and then usually disperse by the 4 th of July holiday. (Almost like clockwork)

    By disperse I mean either spread back out and find a good hiding place...or head back to the lake altogether.

    I have tried my hand at reservoir flathead fishing in Grand Lake, and our local strip pits during the off peak months in the river...and have had little success....instead getting either channel or blues...albeit some nice ones tho.

    I know what good flathead cover looks like...as well as the obvious baits to use...but geeez! Grand Lake is SOOO BIG!

    The way I understand it from what I have read about reservoir Flathead is that they're a mystery to even the biologists that study them.

    They are a riverine supreme animal...developed from generations upon generations of evolution in our river systems.

    An animal like that in a reservoir is out of its element...and behaves in a more random fashion than they might in a river. Making it even more of an enigma.

    Researchers have determined by tagging and tracking technology that there are flatheads in certain areas...such as a huge reservoir that might stay put...occupying, wintering in, and spawning within only 8' - 125' of range in its entire lifetime.

    But in other areas...such as up a tributary of a major river...where they are likely to migrate sometimes great distances to familiar spawning areas or travel to traditional wintering holes.

    And once a traditional riverine system has been dammed...literally impounding certain flathead who have been genetically inclined for eons to migrate...continue to migrate by default. Just on a now smaller scale.

    But still...its nonetheless a significant discovery by researchers who kept tabs on individual tagged fish over a course of as much as 10-15 years.

    I can't help but believe that even reservoir flathead will tend to concentrate during certain times...upping ones chances of getting into more than just a random bite.

    Perhaps this is a piece of the puzzle I need to be concentrating on...as well as input from others who have knowledge of these elusive reservoir flats.

    There's always that local guy at a river or lake near you that is a walking legend when it comes to catfishing...that one guy who always catches fish, and has a response for any given situation.

    I've been blessed to have been tutored by some of the finest old school river catmen in these parts starting at a very early age.

    I consider myself equally blessed to be associated with a small handful of like minded individuals who I not only fish with on a regular basis...but also share the obcession and drive to constantly evolve our technique and modify our tactics to cater to our local catfish, and their catchability.

    But this lake fishing is uncharted territory for us...for Flathead anyhow.

    This is something I will be looking into very closely to attempt to modify my/our reservoir flathead tactics and try to adjust for more success...as I begin to spend more time gravitating towards the lake in the near future during our local off peak season.

    I'm looking forward to input from the other anglers on this board about how their flatheads behave concerning their migratory habits. (Or lack thereof)
     
  2. jsharper

    jsharper New Member

    Messages:
    293
    State:
    TX
    couple of things(also, I am not usually right) Don't get caught up too much in the studies, find what works on your faverite lake. Fish the channels in the spring, the flats in summer, the channels and flats,deeper later,:wink: in fall, fish for channels and blues in winter. I know this works, I caught one a few years back.:wink:

    Jim
     

  3. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    im catching them in their wintering spots . i caught only one flat today, but suprisingly lost a monster on a 8-10 in. largemouth. i had one left in the bait tank, and was amazed when i got a pick up.. fought the fish for over a minute then the hook pulled free. be my luck! not gonna say how big, im not one of those speculators...i have lost good ones before, and it isn't fair to say unless you really see...rollo
     
  4. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    Well...my point is that I'm having problems adapting to lake fishing for flathead.

    I have zero shortage of river flats, channel, or blues...or even blues and channel in the lake. I get more than enough action.

    The flathead however has for the most part eluded me thus far in reservoirs...aside from a few lucky and thoroughly inconsistent hookups.

    I do winter fish for blues and channel...they effectively extend my catfishing season to roughly 10 months out of the year during normal circumstances.

    Studies and research isn't the magic bullet...ESPECIALLY so if you attempt to rely solely on just the study alone...and not applying your own specifics concerning local features, and specific methods that may apply ONLY to you and your home water.

    I never look a gift horse in the mouth...and keep an open mind...and am able to pull wisdom and experience from some of the most unlikely of places as a result.

    Those tidbits and little gems of wisdom you might be able to cherrypick from various sources do add up...and can help a fisherman who takes the time to at least listen to what other average people like what are on this board, the pro fishermen, writers, and researchers have to say.

    You may not agree with everything said...nor will it always apply to you...but some of it can, and will help you out if your know how to use it to your advantage, and apply it to your specific situation.
     
  5. rivercatsc

    rivercatsc New Member

    Messages:
    1,990
    State:
    South Caro
    I think you are putting to much thought into it. You know how to river fish so apply that to the lakes. There is a river underneath every lake and you can fish it just like you do your local river fishing ledges and curves finding good cover near a good drop off. I use to get really intimatated in the lakes also but it isnt really any different than fishing the river you just have to get past the huge amounts of water and study your maps and the holes will look the same on the graph. A GPS witha good mapping unit that shows contour changes works great. Have you tried drifting I think this will really help you locate them. Good luck you will figure it out.
     
  6. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    James...I agree that it's a subject I probably dwell on too much...however an empty stringer for a dozen straight trips tends to do that to me.

    I don't take defeat lightly. And if there's something I can do about it....I'll start flipping rocks to try to find the missing piece.

    So far I have tried my river techniques....and they do work as long as we're fishing the area where the rivers go into the lake.

    But further into the reservoir...something changes...because those tactics no longer work consistently.

    I have tried to stay close to the river channels in the main lake using my fishfinder...and I have tried drifting along them using a variety of baits...since it's not really feasible to anchor in 70' of water.

    Result: LOTS of blue cats on every single bait I tried...but no flats.

    I try the obvious yeller lookin' cover...the stumps, standing timber, mud flats, rocks, ledges, drop offs, ect. And do manage to get a straggler or two every now again...but not the consistency I seek.

    The only places where I really get my game on so to speak is up the creeks and rivers.

    I'm out of my element in the main lake...although I'd like that to change.

    Perhaps I'm expecting too much...and I should be satisifed that I CAN catch plenty of flatheads...just not where I'm WANTING to.
     
  7. jsharper

    jsharper New Member

    Messages:
    293
    State:
    TX
    What I was trying to say is that studies are usually fairly short(2 yrs or so) conditions change. What applied during the study period may be way off from conditions now. I am a wildlife biologist. I have read countless studies. The one long term study was 14 yrs on bobcat diet. I could take any 2 yrs of that study and prove a different point. I just think that water levels, inflow to the lake, water temps, etc. will affect fish movement. I may be wrong, but take it into account when you read the studies, they are right at that moment.:big_smile:

    Jim
     
  8. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    I guess what I'm looking to find is an area where flathead might concentrate within a reservoir...if that in fact is even the case.

    A large number of the flats we're catching in the river during the spring and early summer...do in fact come upstream from the lake.

    What is it that makes these fish hang out for half the year in the lake...and then the other half swimming as far as they can up a river?

    Why not just spawn right there in the lake...or just a little ways up the river?

    There is a staging event...such as rising water temps that triggers the flats, blues, and channels to congregate first in the lake's river channels...and then another trigger to execute the run up the river when water temps become even more hospitable.

    I am most curious about whether some fish will stick around these staging areas year round...Do they forego the traditional spawning run?.....Do they too disperse when the rest leave?
     
  9. Michael Jake

    Michael Jake New Member

    Messages:
    808
    State:
    Troy, Missouri
    Brian, sounds like we share a mission for flatheads on large reservoirs… First of all I’m a river man which often has me thinking in those parameters and have finally accepted the data I’ve gathered. Using Mark Twain Lake for my study which is an 18,000 acre reservoir, here is what I found. The only concentration per say is during the spawn just like on rivers except with no large migration moment of masses. Food, cover and good spawning habitat is widespread and so are the flatheads. I’ve only noticed moments from deep water to the shallows as the water warms then back to a mid depth during summer. They spawn from the dam to the tips of the arms and in between with those areas being with good spawning habitat holding the fish. Post spawn they are even more scattered, during this time I have only noted size of fish taken from locations that the larger fish will chase smaller out of. In other words trying to find the most favored habitat during this period. In rivers, especially small ones it is easy to locate their holes that hold them. In reservoirs we have to find their favored habitat. This is what I have experience trying to find the same answer your searching for. Most of my data was from little tid bits folks share and yes I write it down asap. Then there is the size of bait factor to deal with but have found the freshest most common bait is the best, just finding some size to it.
     
  10. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    i know what you are saying. river fishing is different than the lakes, and the deeper you get into the lake the more different the flatheads act. i have learned this as well. i'm a new guy to lake fishing.. im still catching flatheads on the river, but have no idea about the lakes this time of year. i think the diffeerence between the two has more to do with current than anything.. my opinion and once i can pinpoint it i will say for sure. im not talking current ness. for the flats, but more for how the baitfish move, and how they go almost dormant... ???? the study is on!!!!!!!! rollo
     
  11. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    you can apply the techniques you use on the river.. but.. i will say when i lake fish, we have been more sucessful fishing quite differently... kinda like pond channels cats v.s river channel cats!!! there is a difference...rollo
     
  12. catfishcentral

    catfishcentral New Member

    Messages:
    1,497
    State:
    OK
    I find flatheads in the lakes in the same places I find them in the rivers....very close to the shoreline searching for food. I think it's easier to target daytime flat's in a river vs a lake. There's just too much area to cover to catch a lot of daytime flatheads in lake IMO. When lake fishing for flatheads it's pretty much nightime only fishing for me fishing the upper ends of the lake next to creek and river channels and small coves to narrow down my search. There's also a huge difference in the amount of blues in the lakes as opposed to flatheads. Your chances of catching a flathead in a lake with maybe a 20 to 1 margin in the blue to flathead ratio your not going to catch a whole lot of them. River's are more easier to find both nightime and daytime flatheads. Lakes I just think of nightime fishing and the entire shoreline as a river bank and concentrate on shoreline features that I'd find in my river.

    Oh and I don't think they move too much in a large lake system exept during the spawn...for what it's worth.
     
  13. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas


    Right on Chris...I feel ya dog!! :wink: (You'll have to excuse me...I just got back from the daily commute of taking my kids to school...and am still speaking their language...Lol)

    Ok...this is encouraging...because as you know...we're basically catching the same fish...only you're further south than me.

    I 100% agree with the blue cat ratio vs. the flathead ratio. It has gotten to the point where a guy has to specifically target flathead locally in order to keep the blues off the hook. But still...IMO...that's not a bad problem to have...those blues can sure be alot of fun to catch in heavy current.

    I Might not feel that way if the blues ended up running off the flats...like I have heard others say has happened where blue cats were introduced into their fisheries...just as they were into Grand.

    But to my point...

    Thus far in Grand, Lake, Okla. the reservoir flatheads are winning this battle. If I don't do something to turn the tide this year...people are going to be talking.

    I re-iterate..I am actually catching flathead in the lake...just as long as I'm within X amount of distance of a creek/river channel confluence.

    As you said...I am falling back on my river fishing technique...which is well established, successful, and consistent. (For me anyhow)

    However...day or night...I'm flippin' snakebit when I get out of my comfort zone and its proximity to creeks and rivers.

    There is definately a spring spawning run of flatheads in Grand Lake...it accounts for a sizable portion of the flats I catch every year from Chetopa, Ks and downstream. Above the dam (upstream) during low-normal water levels is a whole other ballgame...due to the fact that you have to search a little harder for flats there since there is no concentration point (like the dam is)...but then again...by concentrating on old faithful...creeks...I'm able to enjoy success.

    Now presumably...every year when the water temps hit 50-55 degrees...the flathead residing in Grand Lake that do in fact migrate to spawn, are beginning to concentrate around the twin bridges area....preparing to choose a side and go up either the Spring or the Neosho.

    I tend to believe that most take the Neosho due to it being a little shallower overall...but much swifter.

    I wonder if these fish are dispersing from their "wintering" holes...and making a non-stop river run as soon as they do so? And just feeding as they go.

    Or, are they behaving similar to what Largemouth Bass do in their pre-spawn transition? Where they tend to "stage up" in a common location, and linger until they are triggered to do otherwise...feeding heavily in the mean time...before beginning their move to their preferred spawning areas.

    The blues in Grand do exactly just that...in the 1-2 months before the blues come on up the river...they catch the CRAP out of them around twin bridges as they linger prior to departure. It's quite simple actually...wherever the massive schools of gizzard shad go...the gluttonous blues are in tow.

    I can't picture this yearly migration being a random event....where the flathead just individually move along until they all end up concentrated in one spot. (Which incidently is my absolute BEST honeyhole on the river :wink:...that particular spot is money in the bank when the run is in full swing)

    As you can probably tell by now...I am USED to pursuing the flathead where their journey upstream to spawn crosses the path of my desire to catch them BEFORE the typically fluctuating water levels whisk them away to parts unknown upstream.

    My home fishing waters are merely a temporary waiting point until they get the opportunity to run further upstream.

    This has always been a good enough of a flathead/blue cat fishery here to keep me content with playing the role of middleman for half the year...and from expanding my horizons to the source of all these catfish...Grand Lake. (Instead fishing the strip pits for the balance of the fishing season)

    BUT...I have an opportunity as well as a means to do so now.

    A close childhood friend of mine recently built a house lakefront in the Honey Creek area....he has a boatramp...and is getting ready to build a floating dock. He also is looking at Sea Ark catfish/striper boats as we speak.

    I'm also in line to get a lake worthy boat this spring as well...as long as my finances hold up...and/or a temptingly priced All Weld flatbottom with a jet pump outboard doesn't catch my eye first. (I can't help it...I'm a river cat man by definition...lol)

    My buddy and I will be targeting blue cats on Grand...which I KNOW I can catch by drift fishing with cut shad just about anywhere along the river channel nearly year round.

    The channel are even easier to catch....toss a piece of cut shad into any cove or the flats, and you'll find them.

    Schools of spoonbill are easy to locate with a fish finder when they concentrate in the river channels as well.

    Want crappie? Fish the endless supply of boat docks and flooded willow trees.

    Whitebass/wiper? Troll until you locate a school...and have at it.

    I even know where to catch walleye in Grand, as well as both the Neosho and the Spring rivers.

    But flathead in the main part of Grand Lake?...grrrr...don't even get me started again. Lol

    Post spawn...due to the flathead's individual spawning habits not being the same uniformly.(some just spawn earlier or later than others do). I believe there is a much slower trickle BACK to the lake than there was coming upstream.

    Water levels tend to dictate exactly when that occurs...but the best indicator I know of is that when the shad decide to head back...they take nearly all of the blues and flathead with them.

    This is repeated year after year here...and all that is left for the next 6 months is a token sampling of flathead, and a bunch of little bitty channel cats.

    If it is in fact occuring. (as I suspect that it might be) Then the beginning of the flathead run...where it might originate in the lake....could potentially be as dynamic as it is when they are trapped here during the full swing leg of the run that us locals call our own.

    This spring will be my first attempt to see if that is in fact the case around the twin bridges area...IF...and its a BIG if...I can manage to ignore the blue cat bite long enough to thoroughly do so...as the blues show up first. (Putting to an end the affliction known as "Cabin Fever")

    Thanks for your input Chris...much appreciated.

    Brian
     
  14. catfishcentral

    catfishcentral New Member

    Messages:
    1,497
    State:
    OK


    Not only are you contending with a ratio that's out of wack there totally different in the eating habits. Blues are pigs and always on the move looking for food. That dang flathead can sit for weeks without eating a single bite. In fact flatheads can go extremely long periods without food.....like up to a year. The state record rod and reel flathead caught a few years ago in Oklahoma was donated to the Oklahoma aquarium and was sick but didn't eat as far as they knew for a year.:eek:oooh: I had a similar experience also, my personal best flathead was 52.5 pounds. We placed him in my buddies pond only one acre in size and for four years nobody caught him. This pond was fished quite regular and thought he had died. Another friend finally caught him on a perch four years laters and his body weight went from 52.5 to 47 pounds. There was plenty of food in this pond for him to eat also. The fish was cleaned and not a single piece of food was found in his stomach. I've seen that many times before also in flatheads that I cleaned. The point I'm making is that your sometimes going to be fighting a uphill battle on catching flatheads in a lake with all those blues and there eating habits. A 20 pound flathead can eat a 4 pound carp and then sit on the lake floor for a couple weeks before eating again since he's hardly moving. I think there's exceptions also....prespawn flatheads and flathead in late fall. I've hardly ever caught a flathead in a river drifting but I will in the springtime. Those flathead don't like to chase there food unless there really hungry and getting ready to move long distances like up to the low water dam.:tounge_out: Now I can't remember ever catching a flathead drifting in a lake.....ever. The only flatheads I've caught in the main body of a lake were always at night very close to the shore just like on the river at night. The upper ends of the lake close to creeks and river openings into the lake during the day are my best best but still the nightime is better on the lake for me.
     
  15. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    i caught A flathead last december fishing in a blue hole. I told a local guy and he caught 4 the next day. I think in the colder months they stack in a hole that is deep enuff to hold the temps that they like. I also think they eat alot of the shad during the dieoff that happens every winter.
    Notice i used i think because i really dont know for sure. I can only speculate
     
  16. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    Oh it's obvious in the Neosho Chris...in years past...before the intro of the blues...a guy could rig up with a decent sized black perch, and rest assured it was gonna be a really big channel...or a flathead (Of any size...it's AMAZING how big of a baitfish a 5 lb flat can manage to chow down) that you caught.

    SINCE the intro of blues...it's a real challenge to keep them off your bait when you want ol' yeller.

    The most consistent method...but not foolproof...is using baby bullhead.

    I never thought I'd say this...but I wish I could catch more bullhead (Of the proper size)...lol.

    The really good tanks have dried up over the years...although BH are notrious for re-stocking farm ponds after they've been eliminated there before via floodwater, and fertilized eggs stuck on migrating turtles backs, as well as on the legs of shikepokes and cattle.

    I knew that about the flats being famous for how long they go between meals...except for in the spring after "waking" up from their hibernation holes...and in the fall...previous to crashing back out for the winter.

    Right around April...sometimes sooner (Depending on the water temps)...we start sticking some pig flathead here and there...by the end of March its possible to target strictly flathead up by the dam.

    And then theres another surge in late October to November. (Once again dependent on water temps)

    During these heavy feeding times...a flat is liable to eat anything that don't eat it first.

    BUT...in colder weather...say during a temporary warming trend for a day, or two, or three...they'll break away from the deep hole, and cruise up to the shore to see if theres a tasty tidbit to be had...something to hold them over for another month or so, until they're triggered to "wake" up.

    During these periods of temporary unseasonably warm weather it's easy to be caught unprepared while fishing a smaller bait selection for another species...such as walleye...and latch onto the flathead of your dreams.

    On much too LIGHT of tackle...and thats no good. To quote Morgan Freeman from Shawshank Redemption...."Ohhh Johnny...that was THE LONGEST NIGHT OF HIS LIFE."

    Judging by past experience...the flats during this time are searching for smaller prey selections...which will digest better during the colder months due to their metabolism being at its lowest point.

    Therefore a good sized flat is much more apt to bite that 1 1/2" - 2" shiner or baby perch...and kick your a$$ if you're not planning on a 20-30 lb shovelhead.

    That's what you're in for with a medium light spinning rod with 8 lb flourocarbon spooled onto it...Lol. (If I don't laugh...believe me...I'd cry...learned that one the hard way one time)

    Speaking of your comments of how long a flat will sometimes go without food...it's also equally amazing to me how long they'll stay in one spot.

    A few years back I visited Bass Pro Shops in Springfield, Missouri. (Like I do every year 2-4 times) And they had a 25 lb or so flathead in the aqarium.

    He was right by the glass elevators on the bottom floor of the store....in a little narrow finger of the aqarium...it was connected to the main aqarium...and had concrete sides...kinda like a good sized concrete tank.

    He was a classic loner...NO other fish would go in there any more because the flat would ALWAYS chase them out...even bluecats much bigger than he was according to the diver/fish handler I talked to there. That tells you something right there...duly noted for future field use. :wink:

    I admired him...even tried to take a picture of him.

    A few months passed...I went back...and he was STILL in the same spot all by himself.

    A trip a few months after that produced the same result.

    By this time on subsequent trips when I went back to BPS...I anticipated for days in advance...and that was the first place I'd go to...to see if he was still there.

    For over a year after that...I was not disappointed.

    Until one day...it was no longer there. I asked if it had died...they said no...they couldn't completely break it of eating crappie that were out in the main tank at night when everybody was gone. So they got rid of it. :smile2:

    How could you not have figured that...they were trying to feed it something resembling dog food. Flats are major predators.

    But...on the bright side...I did manage to learn something from him being in that aqarium that I still use today when I target flatheads.
     
  17. catfishsafari

    catfishsafari New Member

    Messages:
    171
    State:
    missouri
    First let's all agree; Flatheads RULE!!, If you don't agree with that, don't read any further. I think Grand Lake has plenty of good Flathead fishing in it. So your not wasting your time there.

    One; Drifting sucks on Grand Lake for Flatheads. A good friend of mine Jeff Williams has drifted every inch of Grand Lake many times, and you can count on one hand how many Flats he's caught while drifting.

    Two; " Daytime " is best for Flatheads in Reservoirs. I know thats hard to swallow for a lot of diehard Flathead junkies, but it's what works best for me.

    Three;" location " You must have a good locator and learn how to use it well. Some prime spots are log jams in or next to old creek channels. Or any good structure, but Flatheads love logs.

    Four; " Spider Rigging " You must learn how to spider rig. Basicly you find your spot throw out a marker then ancor over it. Set 6-8 rods out flat drop your bait to the bottom then reel up a foot or so off the bottom. Give it 30min. or so then move on.

    When a good flathead bites and starts to thrash around look out. Many times I have had 6 to 8 flat heads on at the same time. Yes I can hear it now. 6+ Flats at the same time "What ever".

    You have to think of Flatheads kind of like Wasps. You look at a wasp nest a see them crawling around minding there own business, But poke a stick at them and look out here they come. Flats do the same thing. However they come looking for food. When this happens re-bait as fast as you can and keep the frenzy going.

    Five; Give credit where credit is due. I wish I could say I came up with this way of fishing, but I did not. I give full credit to Don Drose of santee cooper, one of the "BEST" Catfisherman in the country. If you really want to learn how to Flathead fish Lakes , spend the money and hire Don. I know it's a long drive but well worth it. I did it many times.

    THanks...
     
  18. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    1. I agree 100%...zero flathead while drifting...all blues.

    2. Daytime is my best time for flats on the Neosho River...hands down.

    3. Still learning how to properly operate the fishfinder, but I am getting better. Couldn't agree more about the "structure within structure"...ALL of my best honeyholes are exactly that.

    4. The blues keep us too busy when you have more than 3 rods here in Kansas...it's illegal as well to have more than 3.

    I need to get into the Okie frame of mind here, and get some better quality rod holders and deploy more lines it sounds like.

    I'll be trying your method this spring...thanks alot! Much appreciated.

    I hear ya about the "Ya right" comments...I get those all the time from the guys at work who don't fish as much as I do...until they actually go with me and see for themselves. They sure don't seem to be bothered by accepting the bags of fish fillets I give them every year...lol.

    I'd love to go to SC and hire a legendary guide like that...the Cumberland river for Striper comes to mind also.

    Went to Lake Fork, Texas three years ago with bass fishing friends of mine from work...we fished for the wrong species...shoulda went after the blues and flatheads judging by the pics we saw of them in the local baitshops.
     
  19. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    You have just described my catfishing tactics thus far...on both river and smaller lakes here in Kansas.

    I concentrate on mainly shallow rockpiles and logs/log jams around creek channels for the flats in the river...we're talkin' 8-10' is a deep hole...and such holes are few and far between where I fish.

    On the lakes here in Ks...I look for...once again (old faithful)...creek channels with log cover, or flats with standing and fallen timber.

    I have the best luck with Carolina rigged black perch...hooked just above the anal fin with Gamakatsu circle hooks...strung with 65 lb braid line.

    Grand lake is a whole other ballgame...it's HUGE by my standards. I've not yet established a confidence spot outside of the rivers and creeks.

    And worse...once I do get away from the rivers/creeks...I find myself lacking...not patience...but rather positive results.

    I'll be trying to locate the places you're speaking of WITHIN the reservoir confines...and see if doing something familiar like that pays off for me.

    You know how it is...winters rapidly approaching...and I tend to spend more time playing and talking a mean game on the internet....learning what new advice that I can from the GREAT fishermen on this site..and waiting impatiently for spring so I can get back out on the river or lake without having to chop a hole in the ice...or knock the ice out of my rod guides.

    This coming year adds a whole new flavor to my pursuit of catfish...I'll be doing the same old thing in the river...(in the spring)...and then opening a whole other dimension during the off season....big reservoir flathead.

    I'm trying to improve my technique BEFORE I get out on the lake. I figure it's one less thing to worry about when starting out...although tactics normally do change within the season...a good start, and documentation to back it up is priceless data.

    I just love unraveling a new mystery! And I am ready to get started in only...4 months. Sigh! :sad2:
     
  20. Flatheadhunter33

    Flatheadhunter33 New Member

    Messages:
    3,764
    State:
    Yuma, Arizona
    Im just going off a local publication that I once read. It says that a study was conducted concerning wether flatties in the lower colorado river migrate. A few were caught and tagged and were later caught a pretty good stretch from where they were tagged. I know that in the summer we find them in the canals in water as shallow as 3ft at night. In the winter they are much harder to locate.