Are fish consumption advisories for real

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by jeremiad, Aug 22, 2006.

  1. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    Name:
    Unspecified
    I have seen several fish consumption advisory mentions in various threads, and have certainly seen the stern warnings in the fishing regulations manual.

    Yet I remember the days when the rivers were so polluted that you pretty much didn't fish them. I remember looking at the Ohio and Big Sandy rivers at Virginia Point and seeing a great big oil slick, trash, suds, and disgusting pollution. Today, the rivers look amazingly better than they did then.

    I believe that a lot is being done to clean up our waterways. We are making good progress.

    The question is, are we paying the price now for the years of neglect, or are these fish consumption advisories simply alarmist ranting?

    Personally, I find it hard to accept that fish caught in the freshwater and off the shores of the United States is worse than the tuna and other seafood caught off the shores of China! :amazed:
     
  2. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Ignore the advisories if you want to. But please don't subject your children to the risk.

    If there's a consumption advisory in your area and it says that children and pregnant women should avoid or limit intake of certain fish, I think ignorning that advisory would be criminally negligent not to mention horribly irresponsible.

    No matter whether it's "alarmist ranting" or not.
     

  3. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    Yes, We Have Freshwater Fish Consumption Advisories In Effect @ This Time Here. It Is Mainly Pertaining To High Mercury Levels.

    Surprisingly Enough, I Thought Catfish Would Rank High in This Concern,NOT, The Advisory States That It Is The Fish That Are Primarily Top Feeders Are The Ones To Be Concened About. I.E., Largemouth Bass, Bowfin & Gar.

    To Realize How Bad It Is, Here Are The Recommended Consumption Guidelines,Adults, Except Women Of Childbearing Age & Children Under 10, Should Not Eat More Than SIX OUNCES Of These Fish Per Week.

    Women Of Childbearing Age & Children Under 10 Should Not Eat More Than 6 Ozs PER MONTH!!
     
  4. pk_powell

    pk_powell New Member

    Messages:
    3,485
    State:
    Missouri
    The signs up are up there for our education.Please don't subject small children,pregnant women,or people who have chronic health problems to the contaminants that invade our waters.It's just not worth it.-------pk powell:smile2: Mr t Reps for your post
     
  5. dafin

    dafin New Member

    Messages:
    1,461
    State:
    Manhattan,Kan
    I don't have advisories in any of the water I fish , but there is not far down stream. I don't feed the kids fish out of that river one can't be to careful
     
  6. Flatheadhunter33

    Flatheadhunter33 New Member

    Messages:
    3,764
    State:
    Yuma, Arizona
    The clearest example that I have experienced was when I was in California, I caught and ate alot of Baracuda. On the east coast however, anglers are advise to not eat them if pregnant etc. due to the high concentration of mercury in the reefs. If understood it right, it's good to know.
     
  7. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    What has happened is we used to dump industrial waste,farm chemicals, raw sewage etc.. in our waterways. I think it takes about 500 years for a styrofoam cup to biodegrade. The chemicals are in the sediment of the riverbed. The mussels, the microorganisms are then eaten by the shad and other minners, in turn swallered by the bigguns. Some of these fish, called a sampling are tested by funny looking bald guys with glasses and pocket protectors (No not DH) for chemicals (pcb's, mercury, etc...) Then they apply formulas that determine how much of this stuff you can eat before it kills ya. Then they back it off and tell you how much is safe to eat.

    How much is really safe? I don't know. Incidendally, do you wear a seat belt?
    Why or why not?
     
  8. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    Name:
    Unspecified
    Don't get me wrong...I am not saying that I ignore the warnings. I also realize that some of the damage is done and we will pay for it for a while. But I do wonder:

    Why aren't these advisories posted in our supermarkets? Are their fish any better than those we catch?
     
  9. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    Have you ever heard the term "Farm Raised" lol! that's what you get at the Grocery store.
     
  10. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    Name:
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    Maybe a few of the fish are farm raised...

    I know that in our local supermarket, most of the fish comes from Chile, Mexico, etc. Hard to be sure where the fish comes from when it's shipped in from down there.
     
  11. gcarlin

    gcarlin New Member

    Messages:
    1,353
    State:
    Richmond ,Indiana
    Sorry but if it says farm raised then the fish raised in a pond in the UNITED STATES, but the fish that you can barely pronounce is probably from over seas because they dont want the problems
     
  12. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    You Are Correct !!!, That's Why They Use The Terminology, "Domestic", "Coastal", "Farm Raised", "Imported", Etc.

    For Instance, Snook Are A Game Fish And Therefore Are Illegal To Sell But You See Them In The Stores & Restaurants All The Time, When You Look Closely It Says,"Lake Victoria Snook". They Are Farm Raised In South America.
     
  13. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    my biggest fear is having a child with birth defects and now that my wife is pregnant, she's not touching seafood till she's done nursing. I wont keep anyfish from water where the fish commission has an eating advisory.
     
  14. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,170
    State:
    NC
    Styrofoam cups and soda bottles are not fun to look at in the water, but they present a lot less risk to our health than those coal fire furnaces in the powerplants around the country. Our coal power plants are to blame for the majority of the mercury contamination in rivers and lakes.

    Prevailing winds and upper level currents are the reason for the advisories over much of the eastern seaboard. It is also why there are very few off the coast of California.

    Farm raised fish contain less mercury and other poisons because they are pellet fed fish, while the fish in our rivers are part of the food chain and this is where the mercury and other poisons enter the fish.
     
  15. Rosey

    Rosey New Member

    Messages:
    26
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I heard or read something about that , But its been awhile so I don't know?:confused2:
     
  16. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    39 2006 Pennsylvania Summary of Fishing Regulations and Laws www.fish.state.pa.us[/COLOR]


    COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY
    2006 FISH CONSUMPTION
    INTRODUCTION
    Fish are nutritious and good to eat. Fish are low in fat, high in protein and provide
    substantial health benefits when eaten in place of high fat foods. Fish provide valuable
    vitamins and minerals and beneficial oils that are low in saturated fat. Omega-3 fatty
    acids found in fish are also beneficial, particularly in terms of cardiovascular health.
    Preliminary evidence suggests that early exposure to omega-3 fats may enhance
    brain development as well.
    While most recreationally caught sport fish in Pennsylvania are safe to eat, chemicals
    such as mercury and PCBs have been found in some fish from certain waters.
    The levels of these chemicals are usually low, but could potentially be a health
    concern to pregnant and breast-feeding women, women of childbearing age, children
    and individuals whose diet consists of a high percentage of fish.
    We are not recommending that you stop eating sport caught fish, except where Do
    Not Eat is shown in the advisory listing. Eating fish regularly offers several health
    benefits. You will gain those benefits if you follow the sport fish consumption advisory
    carefully to: choose safer places to fish; pick safer species to eat; trim and cook your
    catch correctly; and follow the recommended meal frequencies. At the same time,
    you will reduce your exposure to possible contaminants.
    Advisories are not regulatory standards, but are recommendations intended to
    provide additional information of particular interest to high-risk groups. These advisories
    apply only to recreationally caught sport fish in Pennsylvania, not commercial
    fish. The federal Food and Drug Administration establishes the legal standards for
    contaminants in food sold commercially, including fish.
    STATEWIDE ADVISORY
    On April 11, 2001 Pennsylvania issued a general, statewide health advisory for
    recreationally caught sport fish. That advice is that you eat no more than one meal
    (one-half pound) per week of sport fish caught in the state’s waterways. This general
    advice was issued to protect against eating large amounts of fish that have not been
    tested or may contain unidentified contaminants.
    CONTAMINANTS IN FISH
    Long lasting contaminants such as PCBs, chlordane, and mercury build up in your
    body over time. It may take months or years of regularly eating contaminated fish to
    build up amounts that are a health concern. Health problems that may result from the
    contaminants found in fish range from small changes in health that are hard to detect
    to birth defects and cancer. Mothers who eat highly contaminated fish for many years
    before becoming pregnant may have children who are slower to develop and learn.
    The meal advice in this advisory is intended to protect children from these potential
    developmental problems. Adults are less likely to have health problems at the low
    levels that affect children. If you follow this advisory over your lifetime, you will
    minimize your exposure and reduce health risks associated with contaminants in fish
    HOW TO USE THIS ADVISORY
    Follow the general, statewide one meal per week advisory to limit your exposure
    to contaminants. To determine if more protective advice applies to the fish you have
    caught, find the locations and species of fish you’ve caught in the tables that follow.
    Find the meal advice for the fish you’ve caught. “Do Not Eat” means no one should
    eat those fish because of very high contamination. The other groups (“Two meals a
    Month”, “One Meal a Month”, “One Meal Every Two Months”) are advice for how
    often to eat a fish meal.
    People who regularly eat sport fish, women of childbearing age, and children are
    particularly susceptible to contaminants that build up over time. If you fall into one of
    these categories, you should be especially careful to space fish meals out according
    to the advisory tables that follow. Your body can get rid of some contaminants over
    time. Spacing the meals out helps prevent the contaminants from building up to
    harmful levels in the body. For example, if the fish you eat is in the “One Meal a
    Month Group”, wait a month before eating another meal of fish from any restricted
    category.
    Women beyond their childbearing years and men face fewer health risks from
    contaminants. However, it is recommended that you also follow the advisory to
    reduce your total exposure to contaminants. For these groups, it is the total number
    of meals that you eat during the year that becomes important and many of those meals
    can be eaten during a few months of the year. If most of the fish you eat are from the
    “One Meal a Month” category, you should not exceed 12 meals per year.
    One meal is assumed to be one-half pound of fish (weight before cooking) for a 150-
    pound person. The meal advice is equally protective for larger people who eat larger
    meals, and smaller people who eat smaller meals.
    Sometimes, anglers catch fish with external growths, sores, or other lesions.
    Such abnormalities generally result from viral or bacterial infections and may occasionally
    be caused by exposure to certain chemical contaminants. The appearance
    of viral or bacterial infections in fish may be unsightly, but there is no evidence to
    suggest that these infections pose a threat to consumers of these fish. Whether or not
    to eat such fish is a matter of personal choice.
    CLEANING AND COOKING YOUR FISH
    PCBs and most other organic contaminants usually build up in a fish’s fat deposits
    and just underneath the skin. By removing the skin and fat before cooking, you can
    reduce the levels of these chemicals. Mercury collects in the fish’s muscle and cannot
    be reduced by cleaning and cooking methods. To reduce PCBs and other organics:
    • Remove all skin.
    • Slice off fat belly meat along the bottom of the fish.
    • Cut away any fat above the fish’s backbone.
    • Cut away the V-shaped wedge of fat along the lateral line on each side of the fish.
    • Bake or broil trimmed fish on a rack or grill so some of the remaining fat drips away.
    • Discard any drippings. Do not eat them or use them for cooking other foods.
    Trout stocked from Fish & Boat Commission state fish hatcheries are
    subject to the blanket one-meal-per-week consumption advisory that
    applies to recreationally caught sport fish in Pennsylvania. If additional
    consumption advisories for state hatchery trout are appropriate for
    2006, they will be announced in February or March 2006.
    IMPORTANT: You must follow these cleaning and cooking directions.
    The meal advice is for eating skinned and trimmed fish.
    Also remember that larger and older fish tend to collect more contaminants, and
    fatty fish (such as channel catfish, carp, and eels) tend to collect PCBs and other
    organic chemicals. Eating smaller, younger fish and avoiding fatty species can help
    limit your exposure. Your exposure depends not only on levels in the fish, but also
    the amount of fish you eat. The consumption of any fish from contaminated waters
    is a matter of personal choice.
    FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
    The advisory listing was current at the time this summary went to press. Fish consumption
    advisories may have been issued or lifted since that time. Notice of such
    actions has been released to the public through press releases.
    For further information or the most current advice, contact:
    Dept. of Environmental Protection: 717-787-9637, web site: www.dep.state.pa.us
    Questions concerning current advisory listings, waters sampled, sampling methods.
    Dept. of Health: 717-787-1708, web site: www.health.state.pa.us
    Questions about effects of chemicals on human health.
    Fish & Boat Commission: 814-359-5147, web site: www.fish.state.pa.us
    Questions about effects of chemicals on fisheries, current advisory listings.
    FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY
    40 www.fish.state.pa.us 2006 Pennsylvania Summary of Fishing Regulations and Laws
    2006 COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORIES
    NO-KILL ZONE
    Water Body No-Kill Zone Species Meal Frequency Contaminant
    Valley Creek at Valley Forge (Chester Co.) Entire basin All Unlawful to kill or possess any fish PCB
    DELAWARE RIVER BASIN
    Water Body Area Under Advisory Species Meal Frequency Contaminant
    Brandywine Creek (Chester Co.) From U.S. 1 at Chadds Ford to PA/DE border American eel Do Not Eat Chlordane
    Beltzville Lake (Beltzville State Park) (Carbon Co.) Entire lake Walleye 2 meals/month Mercury
    Bush Kill (Monroe and Pike Co.) Confluence of Saw Creek to mouth American eel 2 meals/month Mercury
    Delaware River Source to Trenton, NJ-Morrisville, PA bridge American eel 2 meals/month Mercury
    Delaware Estuary, including the tidal portion of all Trenton, NJ-Morrisville, PA Bridge White perch, Channel catfish 1 meal/month PCB
    PA tributaries and the Schuylkill River to the Fair- to PA/DE border Flathead catfish, Striped bass
    mount Dam (Bucks, Philadelphia, & Delaware Co.) American eel, Carp Do Not Eat PCB
    Lake Wallenpaupack (Pike & Wayne Co.) Entire lake Walleye 1 meal/month Mercury
    Lehigh River (Northampton Co.) Confluence of Saucon Creek to mouth Carp, American eel 1 meal/month PCB
    Levittown Lake (Bucks Co.) Entire lake White perch 1 meal/month PCB
    Little Neshaminy Creek (Bucks Co.) Entire basin Carp 1 meal/month PCB
    Promised Land Lake Entire lake Largemouth bass 1 meal/month Mercury
    ](Promised Land State Park) (Pike Co.)
    Prompton Reservoir Entire lake Largemouth bass 1 meal/month Mercury
    (W. Br. Lackawaxen River) (Wayne Co.) Walleye 2 meals/month
    Red Clay Creek (Chester Co.) Entire basin (includes all tributaries) White sucker 1 meal/month PCB
    American eel Do Not Eat
    Schuylkill River (Schuylkill Co.) Confluence of Mill Cr. at Port Carbon Brook trout Do Not Eat PCB
    to Auburn Dam Brown trout, Rainbow trout 6 meals/year
    Schuylkill River (Schuylkill & Berks Co.) Confluence of Mahannon Cr. at Landingville Bluegill, Brown bullhead 1 meal/month PCB
    to Kernsville Dam
    Schuylkill River Felix Dam above Reading to Black Rock Dam Carp, Channel catfish 6 meals/year PCB
    (Berks, Chester, & Montgomery Co.) [/COLOR]above Phoenixville
    Schuylkill River Black Rock Dam to Fairmount Dam Carp Do Not Eat PCB
    (Chester, Montgomery, & Phila. Co.) in Philadelphia Channel catfish, Flathead catfish 1 meal/month
    Schuylkill River Felix Dam above Reading to Fairmount Dam American eel Do Not Eat PCB
    (Berks, Chester, Montgomery & Philadelphia Co.) White sucker 1 meal/month
    Tobyhanna Creek (Carbon and Monroe Co.) Pocono Lake dam to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Tulpehocken Creek ](Berks Co.) Blue Marsh Dam to mouth Brown trout, Rainbow trout 1 meal/month PCB
    West Branch Brandywine Creek (Chester Co.) From business Rt. 30 (Lincoln Highway) American eel 6 meals/year PCB
    in Coatesville to confluence of Buck Run
    West Branch Delaware River (Wayne Co.) Entire section in PA Brown trout 2 meals/month Mercury
    West Branch Schuylkill River (Schuylkill Co.) Entire basin Brook trout 1 meal/month PCB
    SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN
    Water Body Area Under Advisory Species Meal Frequency Contaminant
    Big Elk Creek (Chester Co.) Confluence of East and West Branches American eel 2 meals/month Mercury
    to PA/MD border
    Black Moshannon State Park Lake (Centre Co.) Entire lake Chain pickerel 1 meal/month Mercury
    Chemung River (Bradford Co.) NY/PA border to mouth Channel catfish 2 meals/month Mercury
    Conestoga River (Lancaster Co.) Slackwater to mouth Rock bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Cowanesque Reservoir (Tioga Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 1 meal/month Mercury
    Cowanesque River (Tioga Co.) Cowanesque Reservoir dam to PA/NY border Black crappie 2 meals/month Mercury
    Driftwood Branch Sinnemahoning Creek SR 0120 bridge at Cameron to confluence Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    (Cameron Co.) of Big Run
    First Fork Sinnemahoning Creek-George B. Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Stevenson Dam (Sinnemahoning State Park)
    (Cameron & Potter Co.)
    First Fork Sinnemahoning Creek (Cameron Co.) George B. Stevenson Dam to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Fishing Creek (Columbia Co.) SR 4008 bridge near Light Street to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Hammond Reservoir (Tioga Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 1 meal/month Mercury
    Hunters Lake (Sullivan Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Jacks Creek (Mifflin Co.) Paintersville Bridge to mouth Brown trout, Bluegill, Rock bass, 1 meal/month PCB
    Fallfish, White sucker
    Kettle Creek Lake (Kettle Creek State Park) (Clinton Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Kettle Creek (Clinton Co.) Alvin R. Bush Dam to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Lackawanna Lake Entire lake Bluegill 2 meals/month Mercury
    (Lackawanna State Park) (Lackawanna Co.)
    Lake Jean Entire lake Chain pickerel 1 meal/month Mercury
    (Ricketts Glen State Park) (Sullivan and Luzerne Co.) Yellow perch 2 meals/month
    Lake Winola (Wyoming Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Laurel Lake (Cumberland Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Lily Lake (Luzerne Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Logan Branch (Centre Co.) Axemann to mouth Brown trout 1 meal/month PCB
    FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY
    41 2006 Pennsylvania Summary of Fishing Regulations and Laws www.fish.state.pa.us
    Water Body Area Under Advisory Species Meal Frequency Contaminant
    Loyalsock Creek (Sullivan and Lycoming Co.) Confluence of Little Loyalsock Creek Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    at Forksville to mouth
    Middle Creek (Snyder Co.) SR 0035 bridge to mouth Smallmouth bass, Rock bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Penns Creek (Snyder and Union Co.) Confluence of Laurel Run to SR 0204 Smallmouth bass, Rock bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    at New Berlin
    Pine Creek (Tioga Co.) Confluence of Painter Run to confluence of Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Fourmile Run near Colton Point State Park
    Sinnemahoning Creek (Clinton and Cameron Co.) Confluence of Lower Jerry Run to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Sugar Creek (Bradford Co.) Confluence of Bailey Run to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Sunfish Pond (Bradford Co.) Entire pond Largemouth bass, Yellow perch 2 meals/month Mercury
    Susquehanna River (Susquehanna Co.) Entire section in PA from the NY border above Smallmouth bass, Fallfish 2 meals/month Mercury
    Starrucca Creek to the NY border below Great Bend
    Susquehanna River (Bradford and Wyoming Co.) NY border above Sayre to PA Route 92 bridge at Falls Walleye 1 meal/month Mercury
    Channel catfish 1 meal/month PCB
    Susquehanna River (Wyoming, Lackawanna, PA Route 92 bridge at Falls to confluence with West Br. Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Luzerne, Columbia, Northumberland, All suckers Do Not Eat PCB
    and Montour Co.) Channel catfish, Quillback, 1 meal/month
    Carp, Walleye
    Tioga River (Tioga Co.) Confluence of Crooked Creek to PA/NY border Smallmouth bass 1 meal/month Mercury
    Towanda Creek (Bradford Co.) Confluence of Schrader Creek to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Trindle Spring Run (locally Silver Spring Run) Silver Spring Meeting House to mouth (approx. 1 mile) Rainbow trout 1 meal/month PCB
    (Cumberland Co.)
    Tunkhannock Creek (Wyoming Co.) Confluence of South Branch to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Tuscarora Creek (Juniata Co.) SR 3008 bridge above Port Royal to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    West Branch Susquehanna River (Clinton, Bald Eagle Creek to I-80 bridge Channel catfish 1 meal/month PCB
    Lycoming, Union and Northumberland Co.)
    West Branch Susquehanna River I-80 bridge to mouth Channel catfish 2 meals/month Mercury
    (Union and Northumberland Co.)
    West Conewago Creek (York Co.) SR 0295 bridge to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    White Deer Creek (Union Co.) I-80 bridge to mouth Brown trout 2 meals/month Mercury
    Wyalusing Creek (Bradford Co.) SR 0706 bridge at Camptown to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Yellow Breeches Creek (Cumberland Co.) State Route 3017 bridge at Huntsdale White sucker 1 meal/month PCB
    to confluence of Cold Spring Run
    OHIO RIVER BASIN
    Water Body Area Under Advisory Species Meal Frequency Contaminant
    Allegheny River (McKean Co.) Confluence of Potato Creek to PA/NY border Smallmouth bass 1 meal/month Mercury
    Allegheny Res. (Warren and McKean Co.) Entire lake Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Allegheny River (Warren Co.) Kinzua Dam to confluence of Morse Run Walleye 2 meals/month Mercury
    Allegheny River (Forest Co.) Warren/Forest County line to confluence of Tubbs Run Walleye 2 meals/month Mercury
    Allegheny River (Venango Co.) Confl. of Sandy Ck to confluence of Witherup Rn at St. George Walleye 1 meal/month PCB
    Allegheny River (Armstrong Co.) Pool 6 - Lock & Dam 7 (RM 45.7) to Lock & Dam 6 (RM 36.3) Carp 1 meal/month PCB
    Allegheny River (Allegheny Co.) From Lock & Dam 3 (RM 14.5) to the Point in Pittsburgh Carp, Channel catfish 1 meal/month PCB
    Beaver River (Lawrence & Beaver Co.) Confl.of Mahoning and Shenango Rivers to New Brighton Dam Carp, Channel catfish 6 meals/year PCB
    Smallmouth Bass 1 meal/month
    Beaver River (Beaver Co.) New Brighton Dam to mouth Carp, Channel catfish Do Not Eat PCB
    Beaver Run Reservoir (Westmoreland Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Brokenstraw Creek (Warren Co.) Confluence of Little Brokenstraw Creek to mouth Golden redhorse 2 meals/month Mercury
    Chartiers & Little Chartiers Creeks Chartiers Creek from Canonsburg to mouth Largemouth bass 1 meal/month PCB, Chlordane
    (Allegheny & Washington Co.) L. Chartiers Creek from Canonsburg Lake dam to mouth Carp Do Not Eat
    Clarion River (Clarion Co.) Confl.of Canoe Creek above Callensburg to confl. of Turkey Run Walleye 2 meals/month Mercury
    Conemaugh R. (Indiana &Westmoreland Co.) Conemaugh Lake dam to mouth Carp 1 meal/month PCB
    Conewango Creek (Warren Co.) NY/PA border to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Conneaut Lake (Crawford Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Dunkard Creek (Greene Co.) Confluence of Toms Run to confluence of Roberts Run Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Dunkard Creek (Greene Co.) SR 2021 bridge to mouth Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    East Branch Lake (E. Br. Clarion R.) (Elk Co.) Entire lake Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Eaton Reservoir (Erie Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Walleye
    Edinboro Lake (Erie Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    French Creek (Erie & Crawford Co.) Union City Reservoir dam to confluence of Conneaut Outlet Smallmouth bass 1 meal/month Mercury
    Lake LeBoeuf (Erie Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 1 meal/month Mercury
    Muskellunge, Carp
    Lake Pleasant (Erie Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 1 meal/month Mercury
    Mahoning River (Lawrence Co.) Entire portion in PA Carp 6 meals/year PCB
    Monongahela River (Fayette & Greene Co.) Point Marion Lock & Dam (RM 90.8) to Grays Landing Lock White bass Do Not Eat Chlordane
    & Dam (RM 82.0) Carp 1 meal/month PCB
    Monongahela R. (Fayette & Washington Co.) Pool 4 - Maxwell Lock & Dam (RM 61.2) to Channel catfish Do Not Eat Chlordane
    Lock & Dam 4 (RM 41.5) Carp 1 meal/month PCB
    Monongahela River Pool 3 - Lock & Dam 4 (RM 41.5) to Lock & Dam 3 (RM 23.8) Carp 1 meal/month PCB
    (Allegheny, Washington & Westmoreland Co.)
    Monongahela River (Allegheny Co.) Pool 2 - Lock & Dam 3 (RM 23.8) to Lock & Dam 2 (RM 11.2) Carp 1 meal/month PCB
    FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY
    42 www.fish.state.pa.us 2006 Pennsylvania Summary of Fishing Regulations and Laws
    Water Body Area Under Advisory Species Meal Frequency Contaminant
    Monongahela River (Allegheny Co.) From Lock & Dam 2 (RM 11.2) to the Point in Pittsburgh Freshwater drum 6 meals/year PCB
    Carp, Channel catfish Do Not Eat PCB
    Ohio River (Allegheny and Beaver Co.) From the Point in Pittsburgh (RM 0.0) to the Montgomery Walleye, Sauger, White bass 1 meal/month PCB
    Lock and Dam (RM 31.7) Freshwater drum
    Carp, Channel catfish Do Not Eat PCB
    Ohio River From Montgomery Lock and Dam (RM 31.7) to the state White bass, Hybrid-striped bass 1 meal/month PCB
    border (R.M. 40.0) Based on advisory issued Freshwater drum
    by Ohio and West Virginia Walleye 17" and over
    Flathead catfish 6 meals/year PCB
    Channel catfish under 17"
    Channel catfish over 17", Carp Do Not Eat PCB
    Oil Creek (Venango Co.) SR 1004 bridge at Petroleum Center to mouth Smallmouth bass 1 meal/month Mercury
    Shenango River (Mercer & Lawrence Co.) Shenango Lake dam to mouth Muskellunge, Carp Do Not Eat PCB
    Largemouth bass, Smallmouth 1 meal/month PCB
    bass, Walleye, Bluegil,
    Crappie, Sunfish, Channel
    catfish, White sucker
    Sugar Lake (Crawford Co.) Entire lake Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Tamarack Lake (Crawford Co.) Entire lake Muskellunge 1 meal/month Mercury
    Walleye 2 meals/month
    Thorn Creek (Butler Co.) Source to SR 2012 bridge at Frazier Mill Trout 2 meals/month Mercury
    Tionesta Creek (Warren and Forest Co.) SR 0666 bridge at Henrys Mills to Tionesta Res.dam Smallmouth bass, Golden redhorse 2 meals/month Mercury
    Traverse Creek (Beaver Co.) Source to dam in Raccoon State Park Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Tunungwant Creek (McKean Co.) Confluence of East and West Branches to PA/NY border Carp 2 meals/month Mercury
    West Branch Caldwell Creek(Warren Co.) Entire basin Brown trout 2 meals/month Mercury
    Youghiogheny R. Lake (Fayette/Somerset Co.) Entire lake Smallmouth bass, Walleye 2 meals/month Mercury
    Youghiogheny River (Fayette and Somerset Co.) Youghiogheny Lake dam to confluence of Lick Run Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    LAKE ERIE BASIN
    Water Body Area Under Advisory Species Meal Frequency Contaminant
    Lake Erie (Erie Co.) Open Waters Walleye under 23" 2 meals/month Mercury
    Walleye over 23" , Coho salmon*, Steelhead* (Rainbow trout), Smallmouth bass 1 meal/month PCB
    White perch, White bass, Lake whitefish, Carp under 20"
    Freshwater drum, Lake trout, Channel catfish
    Carp over 20" Do Not Eat
    Lake Erie (Erie Co.) Presque Isle Bay Largemouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Smallmouth bass, Northern pike, White perch, Freshwater drum, Bowfin 1 Meal/Month PCB
    Carp, Coho salmon*, Steelhead* (Rainbow Trout)
    Conneaut Creek (Erie Co.) SR 0215 bridge to PA/OH border Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    * Salmon and trout are migratory. They may be found seasonally in Presque Isle Bay or Lake Erie tributary streams. Trout, salmon and other fish, whether caught in the lake or elsewhere, should be treated as Lake Erie fish.
    POTOMAC RIVER BASIN
    Water Body Area Under Advisory Species Meal Frequency Contaminant
    Licking Creek (Fulton & Franklin Co.) Confluence of Big Cove Creek to PA/MD border Smallmouth bass 2 meals/month Mercury
    Meadow Grounds Lake (Fulton Co.) Entire lake Walleye 2 meals/month Mercury
    POLLUTION or DISTURBANCE of any waterway or watershed is
    a serious violation of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Code that must
    be recognized and reported to your local waterways conservation officer.
    The law provides for criminal penalties for pollution or disturbances.
    POLLUTION is an introduction into any waterway of anything that
    “might” harm or kill fish. Examples of “pollutants” are: Electricity, explosives,
    sediment runoff, sewage, insecticides, poisons, high volumes of
    extremely hot water, liquid concrete or cement, paint, chemicals, petroleum
    products like gasoline or oil, brine runoff from gas or water well
    drilling, and manufacturing waste. Common pollution indicators are:
    Dead fish including crayfish, frogs and any other types of aquatic life;
    strange odors like manure, sewage or chemicals; muddy, cloudy or
    discolored water; shiny, oily sheen on water’s surface; foamy material
    floating on the surface; and extremely muddy water.
    DISTURBANCE of waterways or watersheds includes any alteration
    of a waterway, its banks, bed or fish habitat that “might” cause damage
    to or kill fish. Common disturbance indicators are: Removal of gravel from
    stream beds; earth-moving in or along a waterway; dragging logs across
    stream banks and through stream beds; installing pipes or culverts; building
    or installing bridges; making roadways through or along a stream;
    draining a waterway, wetland or watershed; or changing the channel
    flow of a waterway. Various types of permits are required for any such
    work.
    If you see anything suspected to be a pollution or disturbance of any waterway,
    regardless of how seemingly insignificant, report it immediately
    by calling the local Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission regional law
    enforcement office listed on page 7 of this publication or the Pennsylvania
    Department of Environmental Protection at 1-800-541-2050 (24 hours
    a day, 7 days a week).
    Recognizing and Reporting POLLUTION or DISTURBANCE of Waterways
    REPORTING POLLUTION
     
  17. bluesbrother

    bluesbrother New Member

    Messages:
    429
    State:
    texas
    here they are.were close to the bay and they get mercury cant take fish in certain areas or oysters
     
  18. Pastor E

    Pastor E New Member

    Messages:
    3,194
    State:
    Beebe AR
    If there are warning posted I don`t eat the fish The farm raised fish are raised in very clean water They check them all the time to make sure they are ok only fish raised in the US can carry the Label product of the Us vet nam was dumping fish on us calling them catfish they are some other kind of fish most of the fish in stores come from ms and Ar:lol:
     
  19. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    If ya don't believe the warnings just take a look at my avatar! LOL!

    They have em up here in Jersey and they are pretty severe.
     
  20. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    one of our local TV channels done a study on fish in our local river that has a consumption advisory a few years ago. they collected several species of fish donated by fishermen and sent them off to a university in colorado to be checked out. if i remember correctly they had channel cats, suckers, carp, bluegills, and smallmouth bass. come to find out that yes the fish had pollutants in them but they said that it was so minute that you would have to eat fish everyday for the rest of your life and then it was a very slight risk that you would even be affected in any way. they also noted that veggies grown in your garden had far higher and more harmful pollutants because of all the fallout in the soil from the years that we burned coal. i personally rarely ever eat a fish from our local river. the fish taste really funky due to there being a wastewater plant dumping treated water into it every 5 miles or so.:eek:oooh: