Are ashes good for anything?

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by wylie catter, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. wylie catter

    wylie catter New Member

    Messages:
    675
    State:
    South Carolina
    I accumulate a bunch from my fireplace over time. I was thinking about dumping them where I grow my garden. Would they help the dirt?

    I figure there's probably some good use for them, but I don't know what it is.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    Ashes are good for the garden. Potatos really do good in ground that has had wood ashes mixed in.
     

  3. centexcop

    centexcop New Member

    Messages:
    3,013
    State:
    Texas
    I dump mine around some of my plants. The experts say that they have no nutritional value for soil because the fire destroys the nutrients. They make good filler for armadillo holes.
     
  4. catfish kenny

    catfish kenny New Member

    Messages:
    6,064
    State:
    Iowa
    Jim would know but I was also told by my unc to be careful because it also makes lye and that aint good he killed all his wifes rose bushes with ashes and he aint never been out of the doghouse since and they been married over 50 yrs:crazy:(he did this like 30 yrs ago (LOL)
     
  5. justaredneck

    justaredneck New Member

    Messages:
    139
    State:
    kansas
    most people i know dump them in thier gardens. dont know the how or why of it but they swear it works, at the very least it cant hurt.
     
  6. justaredneck

    justaredneck New Member

    Messages:
    139
    State:
    kansas
    ok after reading kenny it might hurt, just use carefully, like on something that is not roses:big_smile:
     
  7. griz

    griz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,744
    State:
    Murray Ky.
  8. catfish_clayton

    catfish_clayton New Member

    Messages:
    325
    State:
    Catania, Italy,
    Me and my family always used them on the garden. I was always told they give the soil extra nitrogen.
     
  9. BIG_D

    BIG_D New Member

    Messages:
    8,107
    State:
    Batchtown IL.
    I HAVE ALSO used to dust tomato plants to keep bugs off
     
  10. wylie catter

    wylie catter New Member

    Messages:
    675
    State:
    South Carolina
    Thanks guys. I knew they would be useful for something.

    There's some good uses in those links too.
     
  11. MRR

    MRR New Member

    Messages:
    4,947
    State:
    Louisiana,Mo.
    Maybe not in your area but in mine neck of the woods they work great put down on ice so you don't slip and fall.We use to put them in the driveway(on a hill) to help get up it in the car.Just got to make sure theres no nails in it.
     
  12. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    State:
    Virginia
    I found this good information that I thought you might find useful:

    Calcium is the most abundant element in wood ash and gives the ash properties that are similar to agricultural lime. Ash is also a good source of potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and aluminum. In terms of commercial fertilizer, average wood ash would probably be about 0-1-3 (N-P-K). In addition to these macronutrients, wood ash is also a good source of many micronutrients that are needed in trace amounts for adequate plant growth. Wood ash contains few elements that pose environmental problems. Heavy metal concentrations are typically low and not in a highly extractable or available form.

    Note that ashes have no nitrogen value, so using ash as fertilizer will not green the leaves of garden plants. However, potash and lime are usually considered "sweeteners," good for increasing size and sugar content of fruits and tubers (think tomatoes and potatoes).

    Just remember, overall garden pH is more important than anything. Like spices used in cooking, a little bit is good; too much is always bad.
     
  13. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    When we lived in California, I'd dump my fireplace ashes in one particular part of the large garden we had, and that area seemed to produce better than the rest of the garden. Naturally, I started dumping the ashes over the rest of the garden, too. We moved to Florida before I had a chance to tell if they improved the new area, too.
     
  14. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    My grandson Riley and I were civic minded last winter and spread the ashes before the stop sign in front of the house. He loves to help grand pa. I forgot about the garden the last couple of winters,lol Thanks for reminding me.:big_smile:
     

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  15. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,690
    State:
    arkansas
    Name:
    johnnie
    when i was a young boy and lived on a farm my grand dad was always clearing new ground and where they burnt the stumps and limbs leftover after they got the firewood was where he planted his tabaco and turnips.dont know if it helped but thats the way he done it.
     
  16. Luke Clayton

    Luke Clayton New Member

    Messages:
    831
    State:
    Texas
    Luke Clayton here. POTASH... Potatoes love potash and there's plenty in fire place ashes, or so I'm told. I started tilling them into my irish potato patch a few years ago and have been growing some mighty good crops. Hope this help! Now, go to www.catfishradio.com and take a listen to our outdoors show this week! Merry Christmas to all of you!