Anyone have experience with invisible border fences?

Discussion in 'Hunting Dogs Talk' started by DLB-in-GR, Nov 27, 2009.

  1. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    This question is on behalf of my father, who is an avid upland bird hunter. He bought an English Setter puppy, a special breed called Ryman/Old Hemlock which hunts closer to the owner and isn't as fast as many English Setters. He is a young puppy named Jake, my dad picked him up about 3 weeks ago from the breeder out of Wisconsin.

    Anyway, my father had previously installed an underground invisible border fence around the yard, one with a collar for the dog that gives a warning beep when the dog gets near the border, and a poke if the dog crosses it and heads out into the road or out of the yard. The puppy is beginning to explore and likes to go into the woods, out in the field, etc., and doesn't know to come when called yet, so my dad turned on the fence which hasn't been in operation for about a year and fitted the dog with the collar. It still works fine.

    The problem is electrical interference. We already knew that it blocked out AM radio signals inside the border, something about the frequency the fence uses. Found out today that it blocks out coverage for the cell phones too, both his, and mine when I visit, both made by Nokia. He recently bought a new home phone as well (not the old 2.4 Ghz one as that messed up the wireless DSL signal in the house), and recently installed DSL service for the computer which involved AT&T running a new line from the box to the house with an auger machine. Turning on the fence today knocked out the ability to receive phone calls on the new home phone, not a cordless phone but a direct wired set. One ring, no caller ID info, and the person on the other end just hears the phone ringing and ringing, the answering machine never picks up. This has to be interference with the new line AT&T put in for the phone/DSL service, not a problem with the brand new phone itself.

    Turn off the fence and the cell phones get 5 bars of reception, AM radio signals are back, and the home phone works great like it should. The problem isn't affecting the DSL service to the computer at all.

    The question is, what to do? The dog fence is important to him, he doesn't want Jake getting hit by a car or running off, but so is all the electronic equipment that this fence disables.

    Does anybody have any experience with these invisible fences? We don't know whether to get AT&T involved, since it is clearly his invisible fence causing the interference, but a new one is expensive. Between the underground fence wire and the underground wire AT&T ran last spring to the house under his fence wire, something is wrong. Ripping up his fence wire and reinstalling a different brand of fence might not even fix the problem. Any suggestions?
     
  2. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    My father had AT&T come out and they determined that the problem was not the underground dog fence, but some phone wires that had been exposed to the elements by the Railroad company working nearby to put in a culvert under the tracks near the underground cable. I bet this has been messing up the neighborhood phone service as well. They told him that his phone service comes from the west while the DSL service comes from the east and they meet at the little pole near the corner of his yard, then run together as an underground wire to the house. Thus, no phone, but working DSL.

    This does not solve the problem with the Nokia cell phones not getting coverage with the dog fence on though, that is just something he will need to live with. AM radio reception being blocked is no biggie, what is on AM worth his time anyway out in rural Michigan?

    Jake, the English Setter, is growing quickly and has easily adapted to the introduction of the dog fence. With flags around the yard to mark the boundaries, short of where he hears the warning beep, and a good pace away from where he gets the poke for crossing the line, he stays in the yard well. Being a puppy he still needs to be watched outside constantly, but my father is retired and luckily has the time to put into training a good hunting dog.