Anyone Grow Okra?

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by JERMSQUIRM, Mar 21, 2006.

  1. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    anyone grow okra. i just found out that i liked this stuff 2 years ago. i have grown it the past 2 seasons. its awesome. fresh from the garden its hard to beat. didn't have much luck with it last season but the year before it was 7' tall and produced tons of fruit.
     
  2. Phil Washburn

    Phil Washburn New Member

    Messages:
    7,680
    State:
    Shawnee OK
    okra is wonderful - as long as it's cooked;)
    that pickled slimy stuff gives me the willies:sad:

    when i was a boy we had a 4 acre truck patch, and probably an acre of it was okra. the plants would get 8ft tall. my brother and i had to pick it, as the girls said it made them itch. i would wear long sleeves, gloves, and a cap. none of it did any good. that stuff was like rolling around in fiberglass insulation naked. we would itch for days. i'll never grow it again, but fortunately there is a grower nearby and i get it fresh in season.
     

  3. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    boy you ain't kidding sure does get ya itching. i usually just fry mine in batter or breading for about 1 min or less. i love it. its a real hit at my fish fry. one buddies wife comes for the okra alone.
     
  4. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Jeremy, are you presoaking your seed before planting?

    I plant with one of those statesman planters you push.
    Planting seed as small as okra I'll pre soak them overnight in a wet paper towel and mix them with fine sand and then pour it all into the planter.

    When my plants get up 6-12" high I thin them out.
    I fertilize before I plant and other then that I might throw a little bull dog soda around them. A very little.

    I love my okra steamed and slimey with butter.
     
  5. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    ya know i did the first year but didn't last time. it said to on the package so i did and started them indoors but last year i just poked them in the ground. the plants just stayed about a foot tall and they were spiny as heck even only at 2" long.
     
  6. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    some people presoak any seed . I primarily soak any seed hard or small like okra.
    Around here the old timers put their gardens in Good Friday like a religion and I used to.
    I found if I waited until mid to late May I wouldnt be far behind them in harvest and my harvest would usually be of higher quality and more bountiful.
    Gardens take off quicker in warm soil then they do in an uncertain april climate and cool ground.
     
  7. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    with this crazy weather ill be waiting till much later than good fri too. 70 last week with tornadoes and a blizzard last night.
     
  8. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    Oh man I forgot about okra. Love that stuff when its fried up. MMMM
    Only thing I dont like about it is you have to stay on top of it for picking em. Let them get too big and they get tough even after cooking. Around here we usually try to plant everything right on Derby Day or close to it. First Saturday in May. Works great and grandparents have done it for years and years. Oh yeah, I usually soak all my seeds at least for 12 hours.
     
  9. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Ok, everybody likes okra fried, but how many of you like it boiled? YUM! Stick a fork in a pod, lift it up, cut the slime off with a pair of scissors, and pop it in your mouth. But remember, you can't change your mind once it's off the fork. :p Seriously, I like it boiled almost as well as fried.
     
  10. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Rather have it boiled then fried.
     
  11. Texas_Select

    Texas_Select New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    TX
    Okra grows like weeds here in Texas even through the worst dry spells. No need to pre-soak, just plant shallow and wait for it to rain. After that it is all ya can do to keep em picked!
     
  12. squirtspop

    squirtspop New Member

    Messages:
    968
    State:
    Glencoe, Arkansas
    Slice it about a 1/4", roll in cornmeal and fry along with some tomatoes that are just changing from green to pink.

    They have a variety of okra that doesn't leave that itchy feeling on you when you pick.

    If you manage to get a good stand and have some that get to tough to eat you can remove the seeds and dry and have some seeds for the next year. Kinda like culling out deer...keep the best for seed.
     
  13. gargoil77

    gargoil77 New Member

    Messages:
    859
    State:
    Clarksville, Indiana
    Okra is my second favorite to maters. Three years ago it produced well. The last two it didn't do any good and I did pre-soak them. My dad didn't have any luck either. Fried okra is great. But I also like them pickled and slimy.
    What kind are the ones that aren't itchy?
     
  14. catwacker

    catwacker New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    illinois
    love that stuff fried, boiled, in vegetable soup. last year was my first time growing it, got so much in the freezer may not even plant it this year ! couldn't believe the yield for no more than i planted! maybe i'll replant and give away the stuff in the freezer. gotta be better fresh.
     
  15. dahoss2002

    dahoss2002 New Member

    Messages:
    206
    State:
    Louisiana
    MMM! Fresh fried okra from the garden. Tastes so much better than at a resturant. I put up bags of frozen okra to use in gumbo or fry over the winter. I also like to saute fresh whole pods in a covered skillet with olive oil, cajun seasoning, one fresh cayenne pepper without the seeds, and one crushed tomato fresh from the garden for about 30 -40 minutes on low heat. Kinda like steamed or boiled but not quite as "snotty."
     
  16. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
  17. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Unless you freeze of can Okra, tow or three plants are usually plenty. Just got to pick the damn stuff before it gets too big. It and squash are two plants that take almost no care, unless you get squash bugs. Pretty flower, ugly plant.
     
  18. Sinker

    Sinker New Member

    Messages:
    216
    State:
    Missouri
    It's the best way in the world ta thicken up stews or soups. Cut it in chunks or leave it whole. Wish I had some now!
     
  19. CoonX

    CoonX Member

    Messages:
    737
    State:
    Oklahoma City O
    Been growing Clemson Spineless, for years and never had problems with it. It's also a good producer.
    Will
     
  20. kspor

    kspor New Member

    Messages:
    716
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    I love it too. Great in stews, fried, and some like it pickled. I grow the spineless variety and have grown the purple stuff. Thats good eatin now.