Anyone ever brine a turkey?

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Phil Washburn, Nov 20, 2006.

  1. Phil Washburn

    Phil Washburn New Member

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    Shawnee OK
    i have looked at this and it sounds like a good way to keep the turkey moist....a little trouble, but looks like it is worth it
     
  2. Hope

    Hope New Member

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    1,177
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    Oklahoma
    Phil,

    I've never tried it personally, but we watch the show "Good Eats" with nutty Alton Brown and he recommends that a turkey always be brined first, regardless of how ya cook it. He used a big insulated tub and loaded it down with ice and salt for the duration. Good idea, I think, and frees up space in the frig for all those punkin pies :lol:
     

  3. malaki

    malaki New Member

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    149
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    Redmon Illinois
    when i cook turkeys in the smoker i use a marinade of 1/4 cup each butter, sweet red wine and honey. melt it all together and inject i several places on the bird and smoke at 300 degrees until done. keep a waterpan and spray apple juice or wahtever every 30 min and its the best juciest turkey you ever tasted. the only brineing i do is on pork.
     
  4. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

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    4,875
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    I don't know if you are referring to wild turkeys, or commercial ones, but I am a butcher and deal with turkeys all day every day during the hollidays. All store bought turkey are already "brined". I don't know of any reason to repeat the process. Also, salt actually draws moisture out of meat. For this reason, I will not put salt on a steak until moments before it goes on the grill, skillet, or broiler.
     
  5. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

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    I did it last year Phil and man was it good! I don't remember the exact recipe and am still looking for it. I just remember the main ingredients. It had salt,brown sugar,oranges and lemon and a bunch of rosemary. Man the subtle taste of citrus and rosemary were very appealing to me. Find a recipe that sounds good and try it. you may be surprised! :big_smile:
     
  6. da-cajun-angla

    da-cajun-angla New Member

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    louisiana
    I Brine Chickens Too...it Really Makes All The Difference! Its Not Hard....its Like 4-5 Gallons Of Water To 1 Cup Sugar And 1 Cup Salt...u Can Add More If U Like
     
  7. Phil Washburn

    Phil Washburn New Member

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    7,680
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    Shawnee OK
    very informative article about brining.....i will leave my thanksgiving turkey alnoe for now, but i'll do either a couple of chickens or a turkey in a couple of weeks to check it out.

    thanks to all for your feedback:smile2:

    http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/brining.html
     
  8. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

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    4,875
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    Missouri
    Huh. Never heard that before. I still maintain that turkeys from the store contain up to 17% retained water and salt solution. Wonder if that falls into the enhanced category.? I do know the pork we sell is Hormel enhanced pork. Don't think I'll be trying this soon, but it's good to know, and learn something new. I get most of my edumacation right here on the BOC.
     
  9. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

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    I did one last year Phil and posted the recipe on here in DEC or Jan and can't find it now. It is well worth the extra work.
     
  10. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

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  11. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

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    Thanks jack:tounge_out:
     
  12. sal_jr

    sal_jr New Member

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    Ithaca, MI
    Phil

    Ive brined every turkey Ive ever made. It is FANTASTIC when you're deep frying it.

    I use a standard brine mix I got from a friend, on a lot of birds- pheasants, chickens, turkeys, and even an emu (delicious).

    I take a 5 gallon food-grade bucket and sit the turkey in the bucket. Then I fill with water till the bucket is full, then remove the turkey and mark the high-water line and measure how much brine I will need.

    For each gallon of water, use 1.5 cups of KOSHER salt and 1.25 cups of brown sugar. You need kosher or pickling salt because brine will not work with iodized salt. Moreover I use kosher over pickling salt because if you measure by weight you will see that a cup of pickling salt is MUCH more heavier than a fluffy cup of kosher salt.

    ANYHOW...

    From that brine you can start your many many variations:

    For Teriyaki, add a jar of plum or apricot preserves and 2 twenty ounce teriyaki bottles.

    For a sweet flavor use a rosemary twig whole, a half dozen sage leaves, 2 tablespoons of dry ginger, 2 cups of OJ, and 2 cups of white wine

    For a savory flavor add a quarter cup of peppercorns and 12 whole teeth of garlic

    For a honey mustard flavor I use honey insead of the brown sugar and two bottles of French's honey mustard

    for a hot version I chop up 4 jalapenos into the brine, drop a bottle of Red Hot, and 3/4 of a bottle of the rub called "Chef Paul Prudhomme's Redfish Magic".

    I can give you a zillion brine recipes if you like, but these are the ones I do most often.


    Remember also to dry your bird off with a clean towel before cooking. The liquid ought to be in the bird and not out... and it does make a difference. (Why you ask?) You ought to expect the bird to get darker faster as well. Sugars carmelize faster than complex carbs or protiens. A darker bird should be expected. And the darkened spots will not be uniform, but the trade off is a much much better bird. Without drying the bird, you're allowing 2 things to happen: Leaving more sugary liquid to darken the bird AND the skin will not crisp up but will instead turn to a dark mush.

    PM me if you need any help.


    ALSO- YOU HAVE GOT TO GET YOUR BIRD IN THE BRINE TONIGHT OR TOMORROW MORNING IF YOU WANT IT TO WORK RIGHT. 24-36 HOURS IS NECESSARY.


    Good luck, Phil and have a happy thanksgiving.
     
  13. Wil

    Wil New Member

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    1,746
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    Minden Nebraska
    brine? no ive never heard of brining a turkey. try it out and let us know how it goes
     
  14. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

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    4,339
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    West Tn
    I never do it. But then again. My turkeys come out moist without it. That is done on the grill or smoked.
    I stuff 2 oranges in the turkey. And a few other things. And Have not had one dry yet.
    Pete
     
  15. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    I have never had a dry Turkey from my oven, just lucky I guess. I did however manage to dehydrate a goose once! lol
    Flavor is my goal when brining.:cool2: