Anybody ever used plugs fishing for catfish at night?

Discussion in 'GEORGIA RIVERS TALK' started by bugg, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. bugg

    bugg Active Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Georgia

    I have read where a catfish is like a large tongues swimming in the water. They are able to sense vibrations and movement of bait fish from long distances. They are capable of finding food at night or in muddy water by sensing the smell of it on their right or left side directing them in the right direction. They can even sense sound of bait fish as they thrash in the water.

    Sounds like a perfect candidate for the right kind of plug fishing at night (or day for that matter)...:confused2:
     
  2. JEFFRODAMIS

    JEFFRODAMIS New Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    State:
    TEXAS
    My dad has caught channels on many different lures but ive had no luck..my service manager here at work jsut got doen telling em he caught a flatty on a crank bait trolling..:eek:oooh: maybe i should beat the truth out of him:smile2:


    i bet they would work if you could keep those trash fish (bass) away.
     

  3. katmax

    katmax New Member

    Messages:
    1,070
    State:
    griffin ga
    i have caught a channel cat on a plastic worm while fishin for bass...just luck i guess....:confused2:
     
  4. Bomberman

    Bomberman New Member

    Messages:
    703
    State:
    Spring Run, PA
    I've caught a lot of Channel Cats on lures...not targeting them but they hit it anyway. I've caught them on spinner baits and crankbaits both casting and trolling. Funniest thing I say was a guy that was Bass fishing near me when he started whooping and hollering that he had a huge Bass on and needed help with a net. I went to help him out just to see a 15 lb Channel roll at the boat...the guy was pissed! I laughed my a$$ off! I made sure to net it and drop it on his nicely carpeted boat. I bet he still has that slime on the floor!
     
  5. ragincajun19

    ragincajun19 New Member

    Messages:
    361
    State:
    Arizona
    We have a lake here that I troll spoons for pike at and I almost always catch channels while I'm at it.
     
  6. festus

    festus New Member

    Messages:
    7,660
    No, I've not intentionally fished for catfish with artificial lures day or night, but I've caught my share of small channels on them, maybe up to 5-6 pounds. Mostly plastic worms and curly tail crappie grubs. The first time I heard of channels hitting artificial baits was in the late 1960's when the walleye fishermen couldn't keep them off their baits. They were trolling crankbaits on Center Hill Lake in Middle Tennessee.
     
  7. ragincajun19

    ragincajun19 New Member

    Messages:
    361
    State:
    Arizona
    After more thought on this subject, I used to tear up the flounder on jigs with either a mud minnow or a slice of flounder belly meat when I was in Florida. I don't see why a fresh piece of cut bait on a jig worked really slow around structure wouldn't work very well. It would allow you to cover a ton of water looking for active fish. hmmm
     
  8. bugg

    bugg Active Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Georgia
    About four weeks ago I was fishing at night on the end of the sandbar. There was a 2 to 4 foot shelf that ran about 100 yards along the edge of the sandbar. From the shelf the sandbar started dropping off fairly rapidly from 10 to 24 feet. The catfish were coming from the deep water and swimming along the shelf looking for bait fish. We anchored on the sandbar in about 5 foot of water and were fishing with large live brim. We had four lines out two along the edge of the shelf and two on the other side of the boat on the sandbar. Both lines next to the shelf were hammered. We never got a bite on the other 2 rods. The river was high and running swift consequently there was 75 yards are more of shelf that was unfishable without moving.

    It would have been a perfect opportunity to have fanned that shelf with deep running plugs. A dark rattletrap dipped in or sprayed with a sense enhancer would have certainly had all the characteristics of a perfect catfish bait. I also like the idea of tipping a grub with cut bait. It just makes good sense to work a promising shelf, root ball, log jam, bridge piling, etc. with the right kind of lure in order to cover more ground and less time. :eek:oooh:

    I think it should be called "buggering" for catfish...:crazy:... lol
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2009
  9. Bill in SC

    Bill in SC New Member

    Messages:
    4,451
    State:
    South Caro
    Good post. I have caught MANY cats through the years with artificial baits, though never specifically targeted cats with them. Might be a good idea to cast a plug around a few times while anchored on a dropoff.

    Bill in SC
     
  10. catmanoneufala

    catmanoneufala New Member

    Messages:
    315
    State:
    seale,alabama
    i have caught blue cats on hard baits while they where chasing shad in early spring....i think the trick is the older the fish the more live pray they take...so i think its possiable in certain times of the year you can at least try to target them... i think scent will be a major part...load a plug up with scent and try it
     
  11. bugg

    bugg Active Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Georgia
    Artificial Catfish Lures
    Michalis 'BIG Mike' Kotzakolios

    Fishing is the second most popular form of recreation or pastime in the United States (the first being swimming). The exact number of anglers or fishermen is impossible to determine, but recent studies indicate there exists a very large group indeed. Every five years, surveys are undertaken by the Interior Department's U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and done in conjunction with other government organizations such as the Bureau of the Census. The most recent statistics indicate 34.1 million U.S. residents or 16% of the U.S. population fished. And this figure includes only those 16 years old and older. Sportspersons spend a total of $36 billion each year on fishing, and $14 billion on equipment used for both hunting and fishing, which rounds up to an astounding $50 billion spend each year on fishing. That's some catch!

    Cat fishing is a great family sport. The flathead catfish that had its original range in the rivers in the Mississippi Valley has been introduced across the country in various rivers and reservoirs. Catfish lures are made of wood, plastic, or metal objects, designed to imitate or simulate catfish prey. The most revolutionary piece of cat-catching tackle is the depth finder. Probably few anglers know that modern sonar was evolved because Carl Lowrance, the founder of Lowrance Electronics, wanted to catch more catfish! Truly amazing, how mankind developed such modern gadgets to satisfy such primitive urges.

    Although live bait remains the top choice as catfish lures, there are times when artificial catfish lures are worth trying. If the catfishes are feeding or breeding, they will aggressively attack catfish lures cast in front of them, like a spoon, a slowly retrieved jig or an enticingly wobbling plug. One of the best ways to bait these fish with catfish lures is to troll. Trolling works best in large rivers or lakes that have long stretches of deep water with slow to moderate current. When trolling, the lure remains in the water all the time, maximizing the chances of catching catfish. Trolling is a relatively easier technique as compared to casting, and enables the novice angler to cover more water. Using lightweight gear and push-button reels keeps things extra easy.
     
  12. bugg

    bugg Active Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Georgia
    Ohio Pond Management

    Bulletin 374-99


    Channel Catfish

    The channel catfish does not usually reproduce in ponds. Consequently, a stocking of this species can be fished out in three to four years and may need to be restocked. If channel catfish are to be stocked with the bass-bluegill combination, there are two factors to consider - the pond should be at least 0.5 acres, and catfish of the same size as the bass and bluegills should be stocked.
    This species has a very good flavor and grows to a good pan size. You should be able to harvest catfish weighing 0.5 to 1 pound in the first year. If stocked alone and fished moderately the second year, 1.5-pound catfish may be harvested the third year.
    Still fishing and bait casting are good ways to catch channel catfish. Worms, frogs, and crayfish make good bait, and for more sport, try a sinking plug. Allow the plug to sink to the bottom, then retrieve it slowly so it scrapes the bottom and causes a disturbance.
     
  13. fishin4christ

    fishin4christ New Member

    Messages:
    9
    State:
    Georgia
    I can't say that I've ever targeted them, but I've caught multiple ones on a shadrap fishing rock banks at night for bass. A crappie jig works well for smaller channels at times. I seem to catch them on a black and chartreuse crappie jig a good bit as well.