Any advice please

Discussion in 'Blue Catfishing' started by perrycounty.in, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. perrycounty.in

    perrycounty.in New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Indiana
    Ive been fishing the ohio in the tail waters of the cannelton locks and dam. I did catch a 30# and a 10# blue in the past week but it seems like im not really on many fish and i may have just lucked into these fish. Just wondering should i drift fish and stay close to the bottom or watch my depth finder and put it where the fish are. or just try to acher fish the slack waters on bottom. Ive been useing cut shad strips should i change my bait to live . The main depth ive been fishin is around 30 to 40 Should i back out and go more shallow. Any advice at all would be appreciated.
     
  2. JPritch

    JPritch New Member

    Messages:
    1,852
    State:
    Lynchburg, VA
    A 30# in the past week is a pretty good week.

    I hate to give advice on your water since I don't know it....but I do know of some guys here that have better luck with live bait in the summer (gizzard shad). And from personal experience, the shallows can be excellent, but at night.
     

  3. Wiscars

    Wiscars New Member

    Messages:
    93
    State:
    Arkansas
    No magic advise here. Keep fishing and just go with "your gut feeling":wink:. Makes it more personal and rewarding too!:big_smile:Try a small outfit of say 10#test,or a snoopy pole. For some reason,the big fish love those light outfits.:smile2:
     
  4. ncriverrat

    ncriverrat New Member

    Messages:
    333
    State:
    Trinity, NC
    id stick with the current for the blues and try some rigged with live and some with fresh heads, but you might wanna try a little more shallow maybe 6 to 10 ft. fresh skipjack or fresh large bream heads. just my 2 cents:wink:
     
  5. kitsinni

    kitsinni New Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    Ohio
    I work the old fashion way but it is really because my fish finder is junk. I just focus on things that naturally would hold fish and vary my presentation until I get on a pattern. It has worked really well lately. Honestly I will drift a new section of river and catch a ton of nice fish then go to a "spot" I thought was great and not get a bite. I will have four poles out one basically dragging the bottom and the other three at different depths. I will have baits out from the size of a quarter to four inches long. If I don't get bites I will change up the bait sizes to different locations. Then if I get a hit on some poles I will focus on that bait size or depth. One day they only want tiny baits on the bottom the next they want the biggest pieces of fish you can put on a hook 15' off the bottom.
     
  6. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Current does make it easier to locate fish, but lets face it in the summer months, the river is usually clear and stagnant for the most part. Drifting is probably the most productive way to catch alot of blues when the river is at normal summer pool levels. There really isnt a secret method to drifting...I like to find a stretch of river that has a fairly consistant bottom, just makes it easier to maintain control of all your rods when you dont have to constantly adjust them. I also stagger my depths, some rods a few feet off the bottom, some 15 to 20 ft off the bottom. A good sonar unit is very helpful but not necessary. Changing depth between rods will help you zero in more on where the fish are actively feeding. But to answer your question, if you are getting a few fish here and there in current by the dam, try moving away from it and drifting I bet you catch alot more blues..But sometimes you can hit them in the nose with the bait all night and they wont touch it, just like anything else....
     
  7. Catmanblues

    Catmanblues New Member

    Messages:
    2,224
    State:
    S.E Ohio
    The special spot to catch them is really hard to figure. I'd try anything once or twice to see if it works then if not go back to what you have been doing.