Anti-Reverse On AZ-90

Discussion in 'Catfishing Library' started by Whistler, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

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    Original post made by Darrel Miller(Cornhusker) on May 18, 2004

    I had these old AZ-90 parts in box so I have been looking closely at the anti-reverse parts and assembly. I have a few ideas that may help to keep the anti-reverse working correctly. I will use pictures to cut down on typing.

    To identify names on parts here is an assembled anti-reverse on an AZ-90.


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    I looked at every part in this area of the reel. The materials all appear to be plastic, brass and stainless steel except for the “A.R. Dog Spring” and the “Quiet Spring”. Both of these are magnetic suggesting steel or 400 series Stainless. Both of which will rust. Searching my memory I do not remember any reel with a corroded or damaged “A.R. Dog Spring”. However, I do recall several of the “Quiet Springs” were corroded and in a couple of instances, hard to slide around the A.R. Gear groove.

    There is very little load on any of these parts while the spool is turning and the Anti-Reverse is not engaged. When the A.R. is engaged the loads are heavy but none of the parts are moving.

    From the standpoint of lubrication to prevent wear I see no need to lubricate the A.R. parts.

    The only parts that appear to be vulnerable to corrosion are the Quiet Spring and the A.R. Dog Spring. Oil and grease can protect these springs but so can several other products. In fact the salt water corrosion protection products on the market would most likely do a better job.

    With this in mind I suggest the anti-reverse mechanism no longer be lubricated with the exception of a light coating of corrosion protection on the 2 springs.


    I have found that the best way to maintain trouble free operation of a part is to get rid of it. Throw it away. The Quiet Spring serves no apparent purpose in this mechanism except to prevent the dog from making contact with the gear and producing a clicking sound while reeling in line. If for some reason this spring hangs up and does not pull back from the A.R. Dog when the spool starts to release, the dog cannot move into position and lock the gear. Thus a failure of the anti-reverse.

    Try to eliminate the Queit Spring.

    The Quiet Spring removed from the A.R. Gear.



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    The spring easily slips off the gear. You will have to decide if the clicking sound during reeling in line would be acceptable or not.




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    I found it fairly difficult to assemble the anti-reverse with out 1 or more coils of the A.R. Dog Spring being wedged under the A.R. Dog when I tightened the screws. I attempted this assembly several times and in most cases the spring was caught.

    When 1 coil was wedged under the dog the anti-reverse would operate but it was visibly slower and in a bind. Any additional buildup of dirt can make the dog inoperable. With several coils wedged the dog would not move and the anti-reverse failed.

    I suggest a close inspection of the A.R, Dog Spring and Dog after assembly to verify that the spring is not pinched. A pocket knife blade works very well to push the spring down on the back side of the post.


    The design of the A.R. Dog Spring appears weak. The A.R. Dog is pretty easy to move against the spring. I’d like to see that Dog slam into the Gear cog with authority.



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    I increased the strength of the spring by reforming it slightly. By firmly holding the spring at the bottom of the coil the straight side can be bent out about 45 degrees with the other hand. Assembly is the same as before. This modification of the spring increases its strength. Increased strength puts more force on the A.R. Dog to force it into the A.R. Gear cog. This should overcome dirt or binding that now causes the ant-reverse to fail and not engage.

    Consider modifying the A.R. Dog Springs


    While working on some of these reels I did notice a slight white buildup of some kind. Not particularly difficult to remove but I have to wonder if a substantial buildup could cause a bind and keep the A.R. Dog from moving into the gear cog. It came to me that a shot of Silicone Spray (not WD-40) might act as a water repellent and keep whatever the white material is out of the mechanism. This may be one other thing to consider.


    So, I guess after all this discussion I am suggesting :

    - The anti-reverse mechanism no longer be lubricated with the exception of a light coating of corrosion protection on the 2 springs.

    - Try to eliminate the Queit Spring.

    - Start doing a close inspection of the A.R, Dog Spring and Dog after assembly to verify that the spring is not pinched.

    - Modify the A.R. Dog Springs to add strength.

    - Give the anti-reverse assembly a shot of Silicone Spray (not WD-40) to repel water.