Anchoring techniques

Discussion in 'Boating' started by great pappy cat, Jul 24, 2007.

  1. great pappy cat

    great pappy cat Active Member

    Messages:
    728
    State:
    P.A
    I read some where that anchoring techniques set good cat men apart from mediocer ones.I thought id see how every one else does it.personaly i anchor from the bow then drop a rear anchor strait down from the stern to keep from swaying.Its hard to get to a very precise location because youve got to guess how far up to drop the anchor then you dont know where it will grab.I purchased some maker bouys that i hope will help.
     
  2. BassMassey

    BassMassey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,883
    State:
    Oconee
    I'm kinda new to fising from a boat, and would love to see some good advice on here. First two times out though I've been doing pretty much what you said. I drop one off the bow, then once i have it set i adjust the rear with the trolling motor then drop the back anchor. First two times out so far i've been skunked as im still learning the lake.
     

  3. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    I use a 20lb. river anchor from the front. Drop it straight down and let out plenty of rope so it digs in properly. I do not use a second anchor. The reason bein that the wake from ship and large tug traffic is very,very large. Don't wanna wind up on my side or flipped completely. A good drift sock pretty much eliminates the sway that will drive ya nuts. LOL!
     
  4. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,464
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    The following technique is by far the best method of still water anchoring I have found:
    Firstly you will need two good anchors that will dig into the bottom. A length of chain between the anchor and the rope will make your hook-ups much more consistent. Each anchor will have at least 150 feet of rope, I prefer 200.
    Use a marker buoy to show where you want to end up.
    Motor directly up-wind of the buoy a distance equal to about half the length of your anchor rope.
    Set the front anchor.
    Back up to the buoy and continue past it until the front rope is all out.
    Set the rear anchor.
    Now, with the motor off pull yourself back to the buoy with the front rope while letting out the rear rope as necessary.
    When you get to the buoy tie off the front rope.
    Now pull back on the back rope and tie off
    The ropes need to be nice and taught.
    Your boat should now be exactly next to the buoy.
    This method will keep you right over your mark. The wind is coming at you head-on so the boat will not move very much side to side.
    By setting the anchors so far from the boat you will have the ropes at such a shallow angle that there will be no rope below the boat.
    This all sounds quite complicated but after a couple of goes you will find it's very straight forward. Follow my directions as you draw it out on a piece of paper. You will see it's actually pretty easy.
    As for river anchoring, I only use a rear anchor if there is a severe upstream or cross wind that is stronger than the current. otherwise I just use a couple of buckets to help keep the boat straight. The hard part of river anchoring I feel is reading the current vs. the wind so you end up in the right place.
    Good luck...W
     
  5. SEMOcats

    SEMOcats New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    Jackson, Missouri
    My best advice is that however you anchor, get an anchor lift! It will save alot of aching backs! AND make sure you have a cutting device all times in case that anchor ropes wraps around anything including the the prop or your leg!

    http://www.ironwoodpacific.com/produ...anchorlift.htm
     
  6. MoMudCat

    MoMudCat New Member

    Messages:
    186
    State:
    Troy,MO
    When I anchor in swift water I always run my line through the eye and then up to the front cleat. This gives me a nice piece of rope to have quick access to with my knife in an emergancy. It also keeps my boat straight.
     
  7. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    Well I guess that is why I can't catch fish. I drift fish 90% of the time. And do great at it if I say so my self.
    Pete
     
  8. vlparrish

    vlparrish New Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    State:
    Bedford, Kentucky
    Joseph, I can't give you any advice on anchoring in still water, but I have great success with anchoring and catching fish in current. I feel the number one pointer about anchoring in current is to anchor well upriver from your target point. One reason for this is it takes quite a bit of rope to hold in heavy current. Two If it is deep water it will take the anchor a bit before it hits bottom and the current will push it down stream some. Three when you throw out your lines the current will take the bait downriver some, unless you are fishing like a pound weight. Also I feel when fishing current the fish can smell a good bait quite a ways upcurrent from their location and if they are hungry will come and get it. If the bait is behind them the current will carry the scent farther away from the fish. Vern
     
  9. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
     
  10. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,464
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
     
  11. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    I do as Winston does!!!!!:smile2::big_smile:In still water I use either a Chene or wreck anchor with chain and 200ft of rope.The wreck anchors grab quicker since the are essentially grappling hooks but the Chenes hold better under pressure.They also release easily if you get them snagged but you might have to practice the release technique a little bit.Thr wreck anchors need an eye at the bottom to fix the rope (chain) to then plastic tie it to the top.Get it stuck ,just apply pressure until the plastic tie breaks and out it comes.In a river just use the wreck anchor from the front and a drift bag out the rear for stabilization.After developing all this anchoring perfection I mysteriously discovered drift fishing which is a hell of a lot easier particularly if you are by yourself.I had two automatic anchor pullers for a long time but they grew up and joined the Army to get out of the job.Go figure!!!!!:smile2::big_smile:
     
  12. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    yes it works great for that.
    Pete
     
  13. JPritch

    JPritch New Member

    Messages:
    1,852
    State:
    Lynchburg, VA
    I fish in moderate to heavy current so I just use one 20lb river anchor off the bow. I don't really sway much at all.

    The problem for me initially was holding in heavy current. I found out I wasn't letting enough rope out, thus the anchor had a poor angle for a set. The more rope I let out, the better grip I get with my anchor. I also have 5 ft of chain attached to the anchor.