Anchoring in the Mississippi River

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by SkipEye, Jun 27, 2007.

  1. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    I need help. There are two places I have been unable to anchor so far.

    I have a Chene (?) anchor, it is the standard river fluke anchor that pivots but requires no chain. It is sized appropriately for my boat (box said up to 26 ft boat). I have a 20 ft SeaArk.

    I cannot hold in the lock and dam tailwaters.

    1. Would a chain help to weight it down and get it to the bottom quicker and not fly under the boat in the current?

    2. Even when I get it on the bottom upstream of me and let out lots of rope it still drags bottom in the mud.

    3. If I get a little to the side of the dam in the eddies I can anchor but then I drift around in circles.


    I also cannot grab hold in an area that seems to have a mostly smooth rock bottom (underneath a towering river bluff).

    1. What style of anchor might help here?


    Thanks!
     
  2. TeamWhiskers

    TeamWhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    Missouri
    I have messed around with just about every anchor out there and ended up making my own that really do work for just a few dollars. Hope this will help you all.. .

    Take a 4 foot piece of rebar and bend it in a V. The bottoms bend both to a 90 degree angle about 3 inches up. Cut in half 2 gallon milk jugs. Put your anchor chain over your rebar. Pour in milk jugs about 4 inches of concrete and then set in your rebar into both. You can position your milk jugs in a square or diamond pattern depending if you want the anchor to grab or dig. Cost is about 8 dollars depending on the chain mainly. Round Kitchen mixing bowls work good also for this….

    Another one that is my favorite that I use is to make a mold out of a round Kitchen mixing bowl into concrete. It only has to be about 10 inches around and 3 inches deep. Take a 3 ½ foot piece of rebar and bend the top of it to look like a P extending the P up and outward. Put some chain on it and weld it if you have a welder. The bottom of the rebar bend about 2 inches out at an angle so it will catch in the lead. It is best to pour with the mold on the floor and C-clamp the rebar to a sawhorse so it stands up straight while pouring. It takes only about 18 pounds of lead to fill at the most. The chain will catch the top of the P and then dig in instead of rolling like most of the others do. This is the best anchor I have ever had as Cuz can tell ya that it will hold his 24 foot boat.

    Simple Boat saver… I tie a knot 10 feet from the anchor so I know how much rope I have left as not to beat up the sides of the boat. Most of the time, I am in a hurry to get the anchors up and on to the next hole. A lot of people will use anchor chains instead that serve various other purposes. The problem is that most of the chains are only 2 foot long. So a simple knot will give you an indication of where your anchor is in the water not to tear up your boat.
     

  3. duckalot

    duckalot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,971
    State:
    Missouri
    Hey Vince, That sounds like something I would like to make. Can you post some pictures so a guy can get an Ideal what it looks like.
    Thanks, Rob
     
  4. TeamWhiskers

    TeamWhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    Missouri
    Cuz has got the good one rather if he knows it or not right now in his boat would be the problem with that.. He is out flying somewhere till this weekend.