Anchoring Boat

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by kacal, Mar 17, 2007.

  1. kacal

    kacal New Member

    Messages:
    26
    State:
    TEXAS
    i fish from a 18' bass boat and have 2 anchors that are made from plow shanks like a X the tips or curled upward to grab the bottom also have weld a suckerrod on it and added 4 foot of 3/8 chain.here is the problem when i set anchor to fish i tiedown on the front and back on the same side that the wind is blowing from so as to let the wind set the anchor but after i get to fishing the boat starts to turn either from the bow or from the aft or front and back and i have to stop fishing to set again ???? how can i set up so i do not move @ all ???? any help would be a BIG help :baffle: ........................
     
  2. special liberty

    special liberty New Member

    Messages:
    295
    State:
    Maryland
    Use anthor anchor off the stern. If you have enough current/tide running use a drift sock off the stern to keep you lined up. If it's really windy or the wind is backing (changing direction) it can be nearly impossible to get set up to where you are perfectly stationary.
     

  3. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    Are you using enough length of anchor rope to keep from pulling up on the anchors?
     
  4. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    I set the anchor off the starboard bow, backing off so that it is stretched then power forward to the left and drop the port anchor off the bow and drift back. If nec., then throw out a drift bucket straight off the stern.

    Good Luck,
    Shawn(OH)
     
  5. Ol Whiskers

    Ol Whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    Fairfield Township, Ohio
    KACAL,

    I picture the construction you described, but you don't say what the anchors weigh, or how much line you use, or what current and bottom conditions are.

    Recommendations for scope (length of line to depth ratio) run around 3x for mild current and 5x for moderate current. The chain is always a help, as it keeps the current from pullinf the boat and line "up" right at the anchor eye.

    If you anchor in a sandy bottom in current, you'll need a wide bite to hold, something like a Danforth pattern anchor. For mud bottom on my 19-ft Monterey, I used a 15-lb Navy anchor on the bow, and a 10-lb mushroom straight down off the stern - this is in the Ohio River around Cincy.

    Dennis
     
  6. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    I fish the Ohio river an anchor from the bow with a danforth anchor and about 100' of rope then leave the motor down which holds me in position except when a barge goes by which moves me a few feet to the side but I drift back into position as soon as its gone.
     
  7. knockdown

    knockdown New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    Kansas
    make sure you have enough rope out thats been my problem in the past holding on a spot with higher winds
    knockdown
     
  8. tkishkape

    tkishkape New Member

    Messages:
    782
    State:
    Gore, Okla
    To start with, you can't anchor so tightly that you won't move at all.

    If you're in a river, never set an anchor off th stern... if the bow anchor slips, the boat will turn and may be swamped from the side or the stern.

    One well-set anchor at the bow with anchor line equal to three times the depth (scope) will hold in light current or wind. heavier wind or current requires up to 5 times the length of line than the depth.

    As Loanwizard pointed out, set one anchor to the starboard with the engine, pulling the boat 90 degrees to the current or wind the full length of your anchor line, tied to a starboard cleat. Drop the port anchor and let out the same length of anchor line to form a "V" tied to a portside cleat.

    The ancient Phoenicians perfected the use of a three-point anchoring system that uses one anchor in water with a current.

    Set the anchor and let out the entirety of the anchor line, tieing it off on the STERN cleat on the port side. Tie a second line from 1/3 of the way up the anchor line to the bow. The current will carry the boat at an angle to the starboard. Adjust the position of the boat by shortening or lengthening the bow line.

    If it is desired to fish on the port side of the anchor, simply pull the bow line straight ahead and re-tie the stern line to the other side. Loosen the bow line to allow the boat to swing as desired to the port of the anchor.

    In this manner, the boat can be anchored one time and a very large area can be fished.
     
  9. Ricky Dills

    Ricky Dills New Member

    Messages:
    101
    State:
    Corryton, Tenne
    Thanks for help with anchor this is a godd idea we use some kind of float tied off on the end of our ropes like a bouy buddy or an old milk jug so when you get that big one on you can untie ffom anchor and get the fish landed so the big cat will not get in your anchor ropes this has helped me with several 50 lb plus cats i hope this idea helps you all too later capt skibo :cool2:
     
  10. Snake Charmer

    Snake Charmer New Member

    Messages:
    49
    State:
    Ca/Nv/Az
    My boat weighs over 4000 lbs. ..anchoring is sometimes tricky...but this is the Best I've been able to do!

    I put out the Bow anchor...Back up, letting out Most of the rope...then toss another Anchor out the back...Hand Pull up between the two, and tie off. I DON"T do this in FAST moving rivers, and ALWAYS have a Knife handy to cut a rope if needed!
     
  11. Indigo Flats

    Indigo Flats New Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Lancaster,
    "ALWAYS have a Knife handy to cut a rope if needed".

    This is very important not only in rivers subject to quick rises but also especially important at night when a log can drift into the anchor rope unseen.

    I was trying to free a hangup and had 30 lb test Yo Zuri line wrapped around my towel covered hand trying to break it. The boat started moving with the current and the line slipped down and caught two of my unprotected fingers. Luckily I had a knife or I would have had a very serious injury. I ended up with a minor line cut on my fingers.
     
  12. Wooly

    Wooly New Member

    Messages:
    134
    State:
    Illinois
    One of the brothers here suggested tying the line to the boat and using the boat to pull the line free. Sounded like a good safe way to free the line.

    Wooly
     
  13. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    Do you add any chain to yours? I have one. but have a lot of trouble getting it to hold here on the Tn river. And even with 125ft of rope out it moves.
    Pete
     
  14. Indigo Flats

    Indigo Flats New Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Lancaster,
    Believe me in that I learned my lesson! Thanks for the information.
     
  15. tkishkape

    tkishkape New Member

    Messages:
    782
    State:
    Gore, Okla
    If you anchor in a river with a current moving in excess of 4mph, a 6 foot length of heavy chain is necessary to keep the anchor down.

    • It weights down the line to keep it at a low angle to the anchor, increasing the holding power
    • It provides a buffer, keeping the strain more or less even on the anchor when the waves are raising and lowering the bow
    • It prevents the anchor line from chafing on the rocks or gravel of the bottom
    The anchor style has a lot to do with it's ability to hold in the bottom. If the bottom is mud, sand or silt, you need an anchor that digs in.

    A mushroom anchor is only suitable for calm waters on a smooth bottom. It can become hoplessly snagged up in a river or over rocks and submerged driftwood.

    For my money, I carry two Danforth style anchors with sliding links to allow the chain to be drawn upstream and pull the anchor out in the opposite direction than it was set. Each anchor is fitted with a 6 foot length of 1/2" chain and 150 feet of 5/8" woven anchor line.

    My choice is based on need, since I routinely anchor in 3 to 50 feet of water in the Arkansas River with a current flowing from 0 to 6 mph. The bottom varies from silt to sand to gravel, to small rock and on to large rock.

    Deeper water and stronger current both dictate a longer anchor line. Size of anchor is dictated by the length of the boat and to a lesser degree, the strength of current. Style of anchor is more or less personal taste and pocketbook depth.

    Anchoring requires serious consideration because human life and overall boating safety can depend on it. Take the time to study and learn anchoring practices before you have an anchoring accident.
     
  16. aplumma

    aplumma New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Virginia
    I have used a bungy cord anchor line that stretches up to 50 ft from any of the major boating catalogs. It is usually used for anchoring the boat off of the shoreline to keep it from getting beat up on the rocks from wakes and waves. You let the anchor on the cord out in deeper water and slowly motor in to the shore you then unload and tie another rope to the nose of the boat and let the bungy draw it out 10 ft and tie it off to shore. I use the same trick only I use the anchor in front instead of the shore. It will give you enough stretch to keep the anchors from pulling out due to waves and it keeps the side to side at a minimum. I also have found on the rocky bottoms and fast current just putting the bungy anchor off of the nose and letting it catch bottom it does not pull out nearly as often if at all.

    Art
     
  17. gebs

    gebs New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    Illinois
    While my boat is significantly lighter than yours, what I do is throw 2 anchors off the bow at about 20 degree angles out from the boat and let the boat drift back 3-4 times as far as the water is deep. This allows me to pull the anchors up more easily as they are both off the bow. Also, I use spiked anchors that dig into the riverbed.