anchored jugging questions

Discussion in 'Alternative Methods of Catching Catfish' started by tyrupp, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. tyrupp

    tyrupp New Member

    Messages:
    306
    State:
    Ellis,Kans
    I have some jugs by bert and am wanting to use them on a 6500 acre resevoir the water temp is 80 degrees this time of year .The question I have is about how deep should I run them when I night fish,been thinking about running them in about 5 to 8 foot but really have know idea.sure could use a little help thanks
     
  2. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I'm definitely not an expert on anchored jugs, or even on jugging lakes, but I do know that the answer to your question will partially depend on: what you're fishing for, flatheads, blues, or channels; average depth of the lake; types of bottom & structure the lake has.
     

  3. tyrupp

    tyrupp New Member

    Messages:
    306
    State:
    Ellis,Kans
    The lake does'nt have blues ,average depth is probably 25' ,the place i'm wanting to fish has 60' high rock walls with gravel and small boulders in water about 4' to dead trees in 10' then going to the deep 22',thanks for any help.I,ve read about anything you wrote in forum or library and have gained a wealth of information just not much on anchored jugging.People like you are what makes the BOC great
     
  4. BigOBear

    BigOBear New Member

    Messages:
    463
    State:
    TX
    The whole reason I tried jugging a while back was that I was fishing lakes without stumps and limbs to tie my limb lines onto. If it's flatheads you're looking for, I figure if you look for the same type of areas you'd fish a limb line at you'd do ok. I'd look for those shallow parts near the bank where you can catch bait, from there work your way out to where it starts dropping significantly, back up a bit and anchor them. That way when those flatheads start coming out of the deep and into the shallows to feed, your bait is the first thing it sees.

    Of course, that's just an old limbliner talking that has only fished jugs a handful of times... Plenty of other folks on here know a lot more about jugs than me.
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I've had awful good luck with trotlines in flooded timber where the water was 10'-15' deep; and along the edge of a dropoff. The problem is that with the water that deep, if you hang a fish weighing more than a few pounds, it's going to be able to pull the line sideways enough to hang it up. The weight doesn't have to move for this to happen, because the jug can swing back and forth, letting the fish move around.
     
  6. Quackshutr

    Quackshutr New Member

    Messages:
    133
    State:
    Oklahoma, Collinsville
    I'm still fairly new at jugging also but my mindset is like Bears. Set em where the water starts to drop off into the depths, hope they see your bait as the first meal of the night when they come up to the shallows to feed.
    btw, I use circle hooks and most are set in 3' increments from the bottom up.

    Q
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I don't use anchored jugs a lot, but the ones I have are rigged so that I can attach a dropper every 3' from the bottom up. Also so that I can quickly and easily remove those droppers as I'm pulling in my line. Don't want a bunch of hooks laying there ready to grab me if a big fish makes a sudden run.
     
  8. ole whiskers

    ole whiskers Guest

    Form a trotliners point of view,always have a sharp knife on you while fishing mutiple hook sets.
     
  9. muddyjet

    muddyjet New Member

    Messages:
    61
    State:
    Alabama
    I would try to vary the depts in an area that size. If you are able to run out two different sets run one about 5ft below the surface, the other a couple feet off the bottom. Have you fished it with a rod? If your catching fish while bottom fishing then thats where I would want my lines. Hope you catch a boat load.