Anchor

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by mocatman, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. mocatman

    mocatman Guest

    Was wondering waht everybody used for boat anchors. I have a 18' jon boat and my 35 lb anchor off the front doesnt even come close to working in any current at all. Obviously i need more weight, But how much more and what style?
     
  2. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,711
    State:
    Independen
    About 27lbs of lead (in the shape of a skillet or shallow bowl) on the end of a 1" piece of tubing with an eyelet threaded or welded to the end. "MrT" has a nice little thread somewhere, if it can still be found...anchor will hold you anywhere!
     

  3. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD
    Geez...what kind of anchor are you using if 35# wont hold? I use a danforth or fluke style anchor with a length of heavy chain on it. My 14' boat only needs a 5# fluke anchor to hold in current strong enough to push the boat backward with the motor idling. They even make them with slip rings if you are worried about hangups. The heavy chain is the key to this style of anchor, it make the shaft point down and digs the "wings" into the bottom. Then all you have to do is let out enough rope (the other key to anchoring).
     
  4. niteangler

    niteangler New Member

    Messages:
    66
    State:
    South Carolina
    I use a fluke style with chain off the front and a 15lb mushroom out the back to minimize the swaying.
     
  5. mocatman

    mocatman Guest

    I have a mushroom style which i guess doesnt have enough dig in to hold.
     
  6. gilmafam

    gilmafam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,466
    State:
    California
    Get some more chain out there to keep it down the digging...
     
  7. SmokinBarrel

    SmokinBarrel New Member

    Messages:
    921
    State:
    St. Louis, MO
    At Bass Pro they carry a Danforth Style anchor with a small loop welded to the back side now. It works great!! And, they're heavy enough to get to the bottom and lay down for heavier current. No problems yet, but thinking about getting one a bit larger for heavier current - just in case. A great system for pulling the anchor back out, and seems to hold great too.
     
  8. kitsinni

    kitsinni New Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    Ohio
    I have found that the Richter style anchors work best. They are heavy like a mushroom but also have spikes to dig in. They are made so if they get stuck you can still get them out. The only problem is you have the disadvantage of having to get a heavy and stuck in anchor out if it gets stuck.
     
  9. Catfish Pursuit

    Catfish Pursuit New Member

    Messages:
    1,081
    State:
    Missouri
    Call Steve Brown at Catfishsafari and see if he can get you one of the anchors he sells. I bought one and it will hold ANYWHERE in any kind of current. Last year below Truman Dam when they were running generators and spillway gates mine held there with less than 100 feet of rope out. They also have a break away safety feature in case it gets snagged, it will break off and pull out from the bottom. Think it was $70 or so but well worth it. Chris
     
  10. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    let out more rope,problem will be solved.
     
  11. rush_60

    rush_60 New Member

    Messages:
    1,719
    State:
    Troy, KS


    I agree. Here is a bit of info I found on the net-


    Scope Holding Power
    10:1 100%
    7:1 91%
    6:1 85%
    5:1 77%
    4:1 67%
    3:1 53%
    2:1 35%


    To determine how much rode to let out to get a 7:1 scope, you measure the depth of the water, add the boat's freeboard at the bow, and multiply that sum by 7. But knowing the needed length won't help you a bit unless you can determine when you have let out that much rode, so the very first thing to do with your new anchor line is to mark it. You can do this with a marking pen, but short yarns or tapes inserted through the strands is more durable and can be identified in the dark by feel. Five-fathom (30') increments are adequate and compatible with depth measurements in feet, fathoms, or meters.






    Let us know if this works.
     
  12. wedge17.6

    wedge17.6 New Member

    Messages:
    64
    State:
    copan ok
    letting out more rope may work but,, will u not do more side to side movement the more slack u have ,, just a though,??????? what do you think??????
    wedge
     
  13. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD

    I usually use a mushroom anchor on the back if swinging is an issue (its usually not for me, but your mileage may vary). I use a light one so that if a wave comes, it pulls off the bottom before the stern goes underwater.
     
  14. roadkill636

    roadkill636 New Member

    Messages:
    551
    State:
    warrenton misso
    Fluke - danforth style anchor all the way,, I have a #13 and it holds my 24" solid every time, in the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, same anchor for over 10 years never lost it yet
     
  15. playin4funami

    playin4funami New Member

    Messages:
    4,104
    State:
    Saronville Ne.
    I agree with the length of rope being the main culprit. I use about 6 to 8 ft of rope for every ft of depth between my tie off point and the bottom,usually just a guess. If you are concerned about swinging their are several different anchoring techniques you can use. One way is to drop the back anchor and pay out line till you are where you want your front anchor setwhile motoring upstream,kill the motor and drop the front anchor,paying out enough line so the anchor can set correctly,after the front anchor is tied off and holding,pull in the slack rope on the back anchor until you are tight between the two anchors,if you have enough rope out and a good anchor this will stick you in place very well.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2010
  16. Grimpuppy

    Grimpuppy New Member

    Messages:
    3,556
    State:
    Concordia, KS
    I agree, let out more rope. My #12 mushroom holds my 19 1/2 foot boat just fine when I get up into the river. If you are getting side to side movement, you can also use a drift sock out the back to keep the boat from swaying so much. You will never get all the sway out, just the nature of the beast, but you can keep it to a minimum.
     
  17. SmokinBarrel

    SmokinBarrel New Member

    Messages:
    921
    State:
    St. Louis, MO
    Fluke Anchor

    Above is the link to the style I recently bought and really like. It has worked great!!! Just make sure you connect the chain to the welded loop on the front or back, and then "zip tie" the chain to the hole (at end of main shaft).

    Use an electrical zip tie that is rated at "75 lbs", seems to work good.
     
  18. kitsinni

    kitsinni New Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    Ohio
    Is putting out that much rope really reasonable? I do put out a lot of rope and it does seem to help but say your anchoring on a 60' hole that is 420-600' of rope if your doing 7-10X. I just don't think that is reasonable and would cost a grand for anchor rope.
     
  19. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD

    I agree....i've never put out that much rope. I go up a little ways past where i want to fish, drop the anchor and pay out line until the boat is back where i want to fish. If it dont hold, i try again with more line. I only have 70' of rope in my boat, and i have had no problems anchoring in 40 feet of water. Current and bottom type also determine if you need more or less line.