Anchor Weight

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by draghook, Oct 3, 2005.

  1. draghook

    draghook New Member

    Messages:
    16
    State:
    Shawsville Va
    I tried two 8lb barbell weights for a anchor one front one on back would not
    hold when a boat came by do you think two 15lbs would do the job are is
    this a overkill? 21ft pontoon :confused:
     
  2. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    Nope I don't think that would work either. The deal with anchors it's not the weight that holds you it's the flukes for the most part. A pontoon can really catch some wind too. You want an anchor that really digs into the bottom to stop you from draging it across the bottom.
     

  3. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
  4. Kittyhunter

    Kittyhunter New Member

    Messages:
    291
    State:
    Princeton, NC
    I would use a fluke style anchor that would dig in. What you are useing is not enough for a pontoon boat. I would probably use a #20-25 anchor and rope length depending on how deep the water is where you are. The longer the better. I have a 14 foot jon boat and use a #10 anchor with 30 ft of rope in water not over 10 feet deep. These style anchors don't work unless you have plenty of line, If I was going to be in 25-30 feet of water, I'd have at least twice that in rope.
     
  5. Gator

    Gator New Member

    Messages:
    1,116
    State:
    Ludowici GA
    With a fluke type anchor they say (US Coast Guard), that it is best to use a rope 3 times the depth of the water your fishing if it has a strong current, if your in a lake thay say 2 times. I have a 18lb fluke designed to hold a 18 to 21 footer on my 16 because of where I fish the currents is so fast up can not hold your bait on the bottom with out at least 16oz of lead.
     
  6. dudlbugr

    dudlbugr New Member

    Messages:
    176
    State:
    Cleveland, AL
    If you can, try to make an anchor similar to what gofish posted. All of us Misipy boys fish with similar anchors to that, although I like for mine to be made out of flat bar rather than re-bar, because the flat hold better in sand or mud, to me. If there is any current to speak of, I have no doubts that these anchors will hold a pontoon boat. Try to get at least enough chain so that it will go from the end where it is attached to the pipe, to a point at least 4 inches past the flukes. The purpose of the chain is to help keep the rope from becoming entangled with the flukes, and to ensure that the anchor hits the bottom in the proper attitude. If you use flat bar, use 1 inch wide by 1/8 inch thick. I cut mine about 12 inches long, and then use about 3 inches welded to the pipe. Whatever your materials, try to use something for the flukes that can be bent with some effort, but is not too easy to bend. Remember that your outboard motor will bend them a lot easier than you can, so if you can just barely bend them, your motor should have no problems.
     
  7. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    shoot i agree. you are using 16#'s. i have a 15# round mushroom shape anchor for my 17' fish and ski. even in a lake with just a bit of wind i drag slowly along. you need something that stivks in the mud or rock.
     
  8. draghook

    draghook New Member

    Messages:
    16
    State:
    Shawsville Va
    Thanks to all of you for your help. :D
     
  9. photocat

    photocat New Member

    Messages:
    803
    State:
    HOCO, Maryland
    I wouldn't use barbells for anchoring up, for a pontoon i agree that a fluke or like style would be best... ummm i was taught however that the line shouldn't be 2x the depth of the water your in it should be more like 5-10x depending on the conditions... it supposedly helps the anchor to dig in and hold its position...
     
  10. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    In some of the places we fish, the water depth at the anchor is 50-70 feet. While 10X the water depth might make the anchor work better, 600 feet of rope in the boat would probably take a whole lot of room and make a big ol' mess. Also, if the anchor holds with 2X the water depth, why do you need any more? I have less than 100 feet of rope on my anchor and usually don't have any trouble getting it to hold in 40 +/- foot water. I really don't believe that it requires 5X-10X water depth to get anchored. Maybe some anchor styles require more but the types that the Misipy fellas use don't. :confused:
     
  11. MUDHOLE KID

    MUDHOLE KID New Member

    Messages:
    1,178
    State:
    Anderson,S.C.
    I use 32 lb anchors ,but I've learned from alot of trail and error that the more rope you let out the better your anchor will hold because the rope works like a bungee cord.The more rope the more recoil.This is especially true when anchoring vertical.I hate getting uprooted fropm my hold and have to wind in and set up again.so I try to set up solid :D
     
  12. JAYNC

    JAYNC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,312
    State:
    Newport N.C.
    how do you guys normally set up anchors, it seems like everytime I set them I get dragged out of position. I have a 17' boat with 2 20# anchors.
     
  13. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    Most of the areas I set up on to fish are rocky bottomed. If I find a ledge that I want to fish, I motor above it 15 yards or so and throw the anchor. As stated above, I have less than 100 feet of rope and I try not to use all of it. I'll drift back 10 yards or so and wait for the anchor to grab. I usually don't have any trouble. Often, I'll pull straight up to a rock dike and throw the anchor on the rocks. I'll drift out a ways and fish the current seam.

    The places I have trouble anchoring are soft bottoms. The rebar doesn't grab real well. This is probably where a lot more rope would help. Also, as Dudlbugr suggested above, flat bar would give more surface area for the anchor to grab or dig.

    I don't believe that you need a very heavy anchor to make it work. My anchors probably weigh about 8-10 pounds. It's the style that counts. Some of the guys that I have fished with use anchors that weigh even less than mine. They work because of the design.

    I have a 17' boat as well and usually fish in moderate to low current on the Mississippi River. Occasionally, I fish straightline current but I try to avoid it. I'm using anchors exactly like the one shown in the library and I've made a couple with flat bar. I guess when you find something that works, you should stick with it. I don't believe that weight is always the answer. If you can get a 5 pound anchor to grab and hold with 2X water depth, go for it!

    Let's Go Fishin!
     
  14. three_rivers

    three_rivers New Member

    Messages:
    688
    State:
    Tupelo Ar
    I'll second what joe says about his anchors as i've made some just the same. I use 100 feet of rope and every once in a while it may slide a little but when it grabs its there! I fish straightline current up to where i will have to use 16oz on my pole to keep it on the bottom. They work GREAT!!!
     
  15. Individualist

    Individualist New Member

    Messages:
    68
    State:
    Lansing, Kansas
    I pretty much fish the Missouri River exclusively. The current is very strong and the bottom is mud and sand. I've used a couple different style anchors without much success until I made my Chene anchor. With this anchor I can hold anywhere on the river I want and it's easy to motor your boat up past it to pull it off of the bottom. Here's a pic.
     

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  16. TOPS

    TOPS New Member

    Messages:
    4,099
    State:
    Cabot,Arkansas
    In my opinion anchor weight does not matter. I prefer an anchor that grabs the bottom. I have tried weighted anchors and I have been in water where they just would not work. I went to to grabbing anchors. :D
     
  17. badkarma

    badkarma New Member

    Messages:
    772
    State:
    Oxford,Miss
    The one thing no one has posted it to have 4-6ft of chain on your anchor.I have lived on a 26ft boat anchored in Fla.bay and I know for a fact that 6ft of chain will make your anchor hold better because my boat anchors held great during 100mph winds in a class 1 hurricane in 1987.
     
  18. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    I will agree that with a chene anchor, more rope is needed. I would say at least 2X water depth. The reason is that that style of anchor has to have the proper angle before it will catch. If pulled at a sharp angle, it will lift. I have tried a chene anchor and found that it often slides a lot before grabbing. Also, IMO, it does not work that well in rocks. For relatively shallow water that is sand or mud bottom, a chene would probably be fine. Don't forget to use lots of rope so as to have the proper angle to allow the flukes to grab.
     
  19. Kittyhunter

    Kittyhunter New Member

    Messages:
    291
    State:
    Princeton, NC
    gofish is right, with that style anchor, you need to pull it almost sideways to hook it good. I don't think the chain theory is all it's cracked up to be. I think the chain will help keep the rope from tangling in the anchor but I don't beleive it helps to hold the anchor on the bottom. 6 feet of chain is not that heavy. A boat rocking up and down with a wake will lift that chain right up. I fish with a guy who uses chain, I don't use it and I have yet to see a difference in the way they hold. It's all in the rope length. If you have 10 ft of rope in 8 ft of water with a fluke style anchor, the only thing holding you is the weight of the anchor. It can't dig in because it's not getting pulled horizontally, it's getting pulled vertically. I use 30 ft of rope with a #10 fluke in a river that is hardly ever over 8 feet deep. If I fish in deeper water, I have a 30 ft rope I add on. No problems holding.
     
  20. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    I’ve been following this thread for some time, and thought I would offer some more information, for anyone that may be interested. There is a link on this forum Anchoring with some pretty good information on general anchoring, and I have put together some information from other sources. A lot of this information applies to larger vessels than most of us use, but the techniques are the same. You may not always require the 7:1 ratio of anchor line, depending upon the style of your boat, size and weight, water conditions, and type of bottom you are anchoring in.
    I personally prefer a fluke type ‘Super Hooker’ anchor with 5’-6’ of ¼” or 5/16” galvanized chain (see photo 1) for general use. It grabs in a hurry, even in swift water and gravel bottoms, and stays there. My second choice for river or lake fishing where there are lots of logs, snags, etc. is a modified ‘reef anchor’ or grapnel. One that I made is in photo 2; notice the main line is tied to the bottom of the anchor, with the top held by an electrical ty-rap. Usually the prongs will bend if necessary for retrieval, but in the rare instance it hangs and won’t come loose easily, the ty-rap will break, allowing the anchor to be retrieved in reverse. So far I’ve never lost one. The one in the photo is a smaller one, but I have larger, too. The flat prongs will hold pretty well in sand and mud, but excels in snags, where a fluke style may not be retrievable. Photo 3 shows a similar reef anchor with rebar prongs.
    General Anchoring Information: Anchors are designed to keep your boat in a stationary position. Large or high profile boats like pontoon boats catch the wind like a sail. For this reason, it’s even more important for owners of these boats to know the basics of anchoring. An anchor is really about holding power. Design is primary and weight is secondary and doesn’t mean that an anchor will hold better just because it's heavier. The anchor you choose should be determined by the size and type boat you are using and the type of river or lake bottom you will be anchoring on. Current and wind conditions should also be considered. With little or no current or wind, less anchor is required, but if the wind increases while you are anchored, hope you have erred on the safe side.
    Anchor Types: The most popular anchor for pontoon, deck, & other pleasure & fishing boats is the Danforth, or "fluked" type which has a high holding power to weight ratio. These lightweight anchors rest flat on the bottom until upward pressure (from your anchor line) turns the flukes down where they dig into the bottom. The wide crown (top) of the anchor prevents it from flipping over. The Danforth's holding power is good in a variety of bottom types, including sand, mud, loose gravel or clay. However, on bottoms that are grass or rock covered, the flukes may skip or collect weeds preventing them from getting a grip on the bottom. In these conditions you need to change anchor style or move to another area with a different type of bottom. ‘Plow’ style anchors are alternatives that bury themselves and can hold better in grass or rock bottoms but they are expensive and designed for larger vessels than most of us use for catfishing. Mushroom and river anchors and home-made buckets with weight, etc, are also popular anchor types, but they really aren’t a good choice for some boats or situations because the rely primarily on weight to hold the boat in position and are only useful in low-wind and low-current conditions. Another type to consider is the ‘reef’ anchor (see photo #3), which will grab in rocks and grass.
    Anchoring: Most anchors must be "set" to be effective. Setting the anchor means digging the anchor into the bottom to get the most of it's holding power. Using your motor to power into the set is recommended with traditional anchors, especially with larger vessels, but the anchor can sometimes be set by hand or using the current, wind, or drift to force the anchor into the bottom. The boat should be drifting backwards when the anchor is dropped. To "power-set" the anchor, drop it of the bow until it hits bottom, making sure that it does not foul itself on the rope as it descends. Once the anchor is on the bottom, put the boat in reverse and slowly put out enough line to reach the proper "scope" (scope is explained below) from the boat to the anchor. Tie off the anchor rope and power slowly in reverse until the line is tight. The anchor should then bite into the bottom. If it holds with the engine in reverse just above idle speed, then the anchor is set
    Scope or Angle: The key to setting a Danforth or fluked type anchor (and most other types) is the angle of upward pressure from the boat. The flatter the angle, the easier it is for the anchor to set or dig-in to the bottom rather than skip across it. That's why a long scope (line length) is important. The standard scope recommended by most experts is 7 to 1 meaning a length of line that is at least 7 times longer than the depth of the water in which you are anchoring over. Several feet of chain should be used to weigh down the anchors shank to keep the angle low. The chain also helps reduce abrasion from rocks or other debris that could cut or tear your anchor line. The amount of scope varies greatly in relation to the anchor type, wind, and water conditions. In conditions with little wind and /or a light vessel, less scope could be required with a fluke-type anchor. If in doubt, increase your scope by letting out more line.

    I hope this helps someone out there.
     

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