Anchor retrieve

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by primitivefrn, Aug 12, 2007.

  1. primitivefrn

    primitivefrn Member

    Messages:
    786
    State:
    collins mo
    Does anybody use the ball anchor retrieve system, any pros or cons on it, looking for somthing other than a electric winch.
    Thanks
    Jim
     
  2. oldprowler

    oldprowler New Member

    Messages:
    321
    State:
    Mannford, Oklahoma
    Yes, I have the anchor retriever and really do like it. It does take some getting used to but works just as advertised.
     

  3. fcrnnngbck25

    fcrnnngbck25 New Member

    Messages:
    205
    State:
    Lafayette, Indi
    I used one in a boat i fished once. It wasn't that bad and its a helluva lot easier than pullin up by hand.
     
  4. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    I just got mine last week. Got the one from Ironwood Pacific with the 16" buoy.

    Probably could have gotten by with the smaller buoy but lost an anchor once when I had to ditch the rope when the current pulled my float under.

    Anyway, it takes a little getting used to. I think I probably need to deploy the ball a little sooner so it is not right up against the bow. Then you could see it sooner and know exactly where your rope is as you motor off. I am still experimenting.

    But, so far I would say that it is one of the BEST things I have bought so far and I don't know how I got by without it. Makes a tiring job easy. Also when fishing alone it is essential when in current and your anchor is hung up real tight in rocks.


    Note: If you keep the ball 'slightly' under inflated it will fit in the front locker on my seaark. Just have to squeeze it in a bit. The ball is VERY THICK material and should hold up to years of abuse. HEAVY item, well made!

    Buy one, you won't regret it!!!!!
     
  5. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    Now this could mean one of two things?
    Either JIM is feeling sorry for his Ol anchor boy and wants to make his job easier? or
    I'm fired? LOL

    Good post Jim. The electric winch would be nice but if we ever got into a spot that we needed to ditch the anchor in a hurry it could be dangerous.
     
  6. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,463
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    I will second that; they are a great tool.
    Also, learn how not to use it.
    There is an inherent danger in having a float attached to an anchor line when that float is not at the very end of the line, especially if you use anchor line that floats.
    If you have a need to dump the line be very careful when you come back to retrieve it. You will usually be focused on the large retrieval float. There may well be a lot of line downstream of that float that you will drive over if you are not paying attention.
    If that line gets in the prop it will stall the engine and the boat will swing stern upstream against the current. That will put you at risk of being swamped by water coming over the transom in heavy current.
    THIS IS NOT A FAULT IN THE IRONWOOD PRODUCT, a gallon milk jug could be just as dangerous. I have another smaller float permanently attached to the very end of the anchor line to help me know exactly where the end of the line is.
    As I mentioned, they are a a great tool but as with anything there is risk if you are not paying attention...W
     
  7. osage

    osage New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    Grain Valley Mo.
    I was thinking about using on of those white boat bumpers. That way it can be used for more than one purpose.
    :big_smile:
     
  8. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Well, the nicest feature of the anchor lift system (after the enhanced safety) is the fact that your heavy anchor is floating right under the ball when you are done. Just lazily pull it in to the boat. A big fluke anchor can get mighty unruly in heavy current.

    Now my boy can pull the anchor, a job that I usually had to do along with everything else.

    They don't seem too expensive to me when you consider the convenience and quality construction and saved labor for xxxx years to come.

    If you don't buy one of these for yourself, I guarantee you'll be slobbering over mine if you ever fish next to me on the river.:dribble:


    Go buy your own!:0a26:
     
  9. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    also helps if you tie the rope off on the side of your boat up front. This will kick your boat sideways a little bit so you can drive up and around the ball. It's a trip the first couple times you do it because that rope is going to get very close to the motor. Also you want to drive pulling the ball farther then you think you need too. This makes sure the ball has the anchor up next to it. Be careful heard of people flipping there boats in the mississippi using it.
     
  10. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    I think it would be pretty hard to flip your boat unless you are trying to pull the anchor at full throttle. What kind of moron would do that, nevermind, I am quite sure it was some of the people on my stretch of river.:smile2:

    The ball will "JUMP" when the anchor hits it and you'll probably briefly see the anchor or chain when it does this. Since the rope only slides freely one direction the anchor will hang suspended from the ball for the duration of the retrieve.

    Agreed, you have to watch the ball and know at all times where that rope is.
     
  11. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    What size of buoy are you all using, and how heavy is your anchor?

    My anchor is just under 30 lbs and the web site says the 13" buoy will handle it, but with the current of the Missouri, I wonder if I'd need the 16" buoy instead?
     
  12. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    I was just looking at them also. Our river anchors are just under 30 pounds. Dont want to get the smaller one if its not going to lift it. Anyone tried that 13 yet? May be better off with the 16 to be on the safe side but like the idea of smaller for more room in the boat.
     
  13. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl

    Marty, I bought the 16" buoy. Mostly because I was worried about current etc.

    I have a pretty large Fluke anchor plus 6 feet of 3/8" galv. chain. I don't know what it weighs.

    I will say though that the ball pretty much stays on top and the anchor comes up to the ball. (does that make sense?):tounge_out:

    The 16" ball is overkill but why take a chance on a smaller one.

    The Ironwood Pacific balls are extremely well designed in my opinion and made of HEAVY MATERIAL. Should last and last and last! They are of a hard type plastic, not a soft rubber.

    I am pretty excited about mine if you can't tell.:cool2:
     
  14. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    Ok, I'm sold.

    What's a good online source for buying the AnchorLift? Cabela's probably carries them, but someone else probably carries them cheaper...
     
  15. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
  16. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl

    Easy Instructions for the morons that flipped their boat over:



    How does the AnchorLift work?



    The AnchorLift uses the flotation of a buoy and the forward movement of the boat to float the anchor to the surface.
    To anchor with the AnchorLift...
    1. Attach a buoy to the AnchorLift. Slide the AnchorLift over the end of the anchor line, threading the line under the sliding bolt (figure 1).
    2. Knot the anchor line near its end. Fasten the line to your boat.
    3. Release the anchor by sliding the bolt to the "up" position, allowing the anchor line to slide through the AnchorLift.
    To raise your anchor...
    1. Motor your boat at a 30 degree angle off of your anchor point, taking care to keep the anchor line clear of your prop (figure 2).
    2. Proceed slowly (roughly 5 knots) until the anchor has released from the bottom, then increase speed slightly (6 to 8 knots).
    3. The anchor line will slide through the AnchorLift and float the anchor to the surface (figure 3).
    4. When the anchor has reached the surface, shift into neutral and pull in the slack anchor line. The sliding bolt will lock the anchor at the surface for easy retrieval.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. primitivefrn

    primitivefrn Member

    Messages:
    786
    State:
    collins mo
    Cabelas has them, on sale right now ,their brand 18.99 the Ironwood pacific
    around 53.00 Bass pro about 10 cheaper.
    Jim
     
  18. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Are you sure you aren't just getting the slide mechanism for $18.99? Thats the way I read it. Then you have to put your own buoy on.

    The one they have with a buoy has a ring instead of the locking slide doo-daddy.

    Maybe I am wrong.:tounge_out:
     
  19. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    I checked out cabelas and its just the slide I believe. Still will need to buy the bouy.
     
  20. skydiver41

    skydiver41 New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    Missouri