Anchor or tie off you trotlines?

Discussion in 'Alternative Methods of Catching Catfish' started by whiteriver, Aug 27, 2009.

  1. whiteriver

    whiteriver New Member

    Messages:
    617
    State:
    in
    Do you prefer to anchor the tag end of a trotline or tie it off to a snag or root? If anchoring it, how much weight do you like to use?
     
  2. mavmannate

    mavmannate New Member

    Messages:
    678
    State:
    De soto, Kansas

    I will be using a folgers coffee can filled with cement with an Eye hook at the top... i asked people on BOC and multiple people said that its more than enough. at least 15 lbs i think! Hope this helps ya!:cool2:
     

  3. atvracer

    atvracer Member

    Messages:
    292
    State:
    IN-47501
    When I used to trotline I would tie it to roots, etc. then put a large(10-15 lb) weight a few feet from the bank to sink the line.


    Where on the White are you located?
     
  4. whiteriver

    whiteriver New Member

    Messages:
    617
    State:
    in
    I'm still waiting on you to call me about the cabin down the river from yours.
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I much prefer to tie my lines off wherever possible. I always carry extra mainline cord so I can add to the ends of my lines to reach tie-off points. Of course, that's not always possible. Where I do have to use an anchor, if possible, I add an extra 50'-100' of hookless line before I attach it to the; anchor. That way, I can snag the line and pull it to the surface without having to lift the anchor. About the lightest anchor I'll use is an old wheel rim, which works well on muddy or sandy bottoms. There are other ways to rig an anchor, using a surface float, but around here, using anything that marks where your trotline is means that you're going to have a lot of people helping you run your lines, and some cutting them.
     
  6. whiteriver

    whiteriver New Member

    Messages:
    617
    State:
    in
    Thanks Jerry; I am amazed at all the new ideas an old fart can get on here. The Harbor Master (Wife) says I am "full of it" but I just keep on learning more "vital" information. I never really had been bothered by thieves back several years ago but now days I think some guys get their bait off other peoples trotlines 'cause they are too lazy to get their own.
     
  7. whiteriver

    whiteriver New Member

    Messages:
    617
    State:
    in
    Don't you remember me Jason? :embarassed: Have you finished your cabin yet? :wink:
     
  8. Poppa

    Poppa New Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    State:
    Pinson, Al
    I anchor both ends of my trotline. In Alabama if you tie off within 25'
    of the bank the first few feet have to be cotton cord so it will rot. I
    do not like having to fool with cotton cord so I anchor a way from the
    bank. The weight I use depends on the current. You defiantly want to
    use enough weight that you don't disturb your anchor while raising your
    line. You don't want to have to stretch your line every time you run it.
     
  9. bodie

    bodie New Member

    Messages:
    130
    State:
    Missouri
    If I am fishing a sandbar I get the biggest rock that I can find and run my line up to a jug. If the water is 4ft I will have 8ft of line going to the jug. I then tie my trotline to the jug and weigh the other end with a window weight. If the trotline in long, I tie some 20oz pop bottles (empty) to the line to help keep it tight and the lines off of the bottom.
     
  10. Bumpkin68

    Bumpkin68 New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    Abbeville, Louisiana
    I tie mine from bridge pilings to a stump on or very near bank. Too much current and tug boats for me to anchor them, I would think, although I never really tried. Tying them off works well for me.
     
  11. Welder

    Welder New Member

    Messages:
    4,834
    State:
    Missouri
    I tie off to the bank alot, but somtimes there ant a good spot or snagg to tie off to. I dont wont lines moven due to snags ect fishen on the MO river . I use plain jane ol cinder blocks on both ends of a line they stay set and weigh 25lbs. I use 25 ft to 50 ft of 1/4 inch rope from the cinder block to the trotline on both ends. Now heres the kicker to make it easy to get to and keep theives off the set. Use a old beat up 16 ounce soda bottle tied of to the trotline with light trotline cord right @ the point where the rope and trotline meet. I use enough cord so it dont pull the line up and has 6 to 10 ft of extra line in case the water comes up, you can find it. Also carry a small grapple hook and line to fish the line out if the soda bottle gets popped or cut off. Hope this helps.
     
  12. playin4funami

    playin4funami New Member

    Messages:
    4,104
    State:
    Saronville Ne.
    the only places I've done any trotlining I don't usually have to worry about them being bothered,so what I do it I cannot tie off both ends is set an anchor,usually a concrete block,on a length of poly rope and tie a jug on the rope with about two foot of slack between the anchor and jug,then tie my trotline end on that end peice of rope past the jug,stretch it out and when tying off to the log/stump,whatever,I pull the trotline tight enough to submerge the jug about a foot underwater,then tie it off,it gives the fish something to fight against,and holds the line near the surface and keeps it tight.
     
  13. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky

    I agree with Jerry. I'd much prefer to tie my lines off to a root or a snag (using a bungie cord in the arrangement for give) than to use an anchor. Even better, the absolute best, if you're in a situation where thievery is not a concern, is to come on up out of the water and tie off to a treelimb just as you would a limbline. Everybody knows me and knows where I trotline and for the past three years I've (we've) (2-3 of us have shared the same line by handing it over to the other when done fishing for a while) tied it to tree limbs out of the water. It's fun to anticipate how many or how big the fish may be when the limb is shaking when you approach to check the line.

    We're fortunate up here in that the river is narrow enough (80-120 yds) to allow for us to run the trotline bank to bank. which allows for us to do all sorts of tweeking for hook depth.