An old man's auction legacy

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by cheapNdisgusting, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. cheapNdisgusting

    cheapNdisgusting Well-Known Member Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    17,924
    State:
    Yonder in Mo.
    Name:
    Russ
    I met and got to like a person that died before I ever heard of him. Sounds like the Twilight Zone.
    I will explain.

    I went to an farm auction last weekend. The auctioneer was commissioned by the county to re-coup Medicaid money. This guy got put into a nursing home and the state (Missouri) paid the meicaid. While there, he passed away. Now they (the state) want thier (our) money back. This is the only background I know.

    When I first got there the main focal point was a Dodge pick-up with a bashed in front fender. The license expired in 2006. The tires were sunk in the ground a few inches so I could tell it had been right there for a few years. There was also a Lincoln Town Car sitting beside the house that had been there for quite a long time. No license on it but it was overgrown with weeds and the tires were all flat. This made me believe that the Lincoln haddent been driven in at least ten years. Probably since his wife passed away. The truck haden't been driven since the accident, and was probably why he got put in the nursing home. He just couldn't take care of himself anymore.

    On his farm, there is a large barn in good shape, several outbuildings that had seen better days, a nice house that we couldn't go in (Sheriff's tape encircling the whole house) and a concrete block workshop about 60' X 100'. Six big flatbed farm trailers were stacked full of his stuff, and a lot of older furniture was lined up in the front yard. An amature radio tower was in the backyard, standing about 75' high.

    In the barn was a large old Allis Chalmers tractor (110) that was still hooked to a disk and the tires were sunk and flat. Probably had been sitting right there since he had to quit farming. There (in the barn) was an old John Deere combine with a soybean header. The old combine was an open one where the operator sat right over the header right out in the open. It was in really good shape. There was a 10 row planter buried under a bunch of asst stuff, piles of rough sawn lumber neatly stacked and vented, barrels of chemicals and oil, and a lot of accumilated junk. You could tell that nobody had farmed in a long time.


    Most of the tools and equiptment from the workshop were outside on the trailers but I could still tell where they had been. In it's day the workshop was state of the art. A forge, huge anvil, welder, barrel stove, homemade hydraulic press, Huge air compressor, old metal lathe, floor to ceiling bins full of everything he could possibly need on a farm, and the back half of the workshop was walled off and made into a woodshop.

    In the woodshop was a lumber stack that would bring tears to a woodworker. Floor to ceiling racks of oak, cedar, walnut, poplar, all in asst lengths and widths. Two table saws, wood lathe, planer, router table, 4' X 10' workbench, and shelves where tools had been. A couple unfinished projects were standing in the corner. One of them was an unfinished walnut gunstock for a Kentucky rifle.

    Outside on the flatbeds were his tools. Most were old but in good shape. They were good tools that were used a lot. Some of his wood chisels had been sharpened so many time they were getting really short (but sharp). Hammers of every size, wrenches (no Japan crap) from 1/4" up to 3 1/2", socket sets 1/4", 1/2", and 3/4" drives, impact sockets, 3' pipe wrenches, hand planes both wooden and steel, and power tools out the ying yang. There were two types of power hand tools. Really good well used ones, and new or practically new WalMart christmas present type ones. He didn't use them. I couldn't think of any tool he didn't have that he needed.

    Then I started looking at the furniture. An oak round pedastle type dinning room table with 6 chairs. This table and all six chairs had his initials inlaid in walnut. Beautiful. He made them. End tables, coffee table, walnut dresser, walnut head and foot board, all made by him, and all perfect - well used but perfect.

    I didn't see any fishing gear at all, but he was definitely a hunter. A 410. / 22. over-under, couple shotguns, and a lever action winchester rifle. All old and well used but in really good shape. A lot of duck and goose decoys that had been well cared for but also well used.

    I never met him, only found out his name from the auction flyer, have no idea what he looked like, but I spent a day with him and his passions. I like him. I wish I had met him in person. My loss.

    ps. The dining room table and chairs sold for more than his truck and Lincoln combined. Kinda proud of that.
     
  2. JEFFRODAMIS

    JEFFRODAMIS New Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    State:
    TEXAS
    that is awesome


    i can only hope to be near that good with my wood working.


    i bet in 60 years none fo the kids in school today would even know people actually did this type of stuff
     

  3. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

    Messages:
    13,546
    Thanks Russell. You made me like him too; I bet he would have been an interesting fellow to meet. Once again, your way with words took me somewhere. Glad I got to go. :cool2:
     
  4. restorerancientiron

    restorerancientiron New Member

    Messages:
    1,061
    State:
    Cadiz, KY
    Great story and sounds like a wonderful person.
     
  5. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Makes a man's life a little more worthwhile when you can describe him and his ways that none had a chance to see. I'll bet ya though when he was doing the things he did and did well he wasn't thinking of what someone else thought about them.
     
  6. bluejay

    bluejay Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,502
    State:
    Napoleon, Mo.
    Thanks for the trip!!
     
  7. Swampfox.

    Swampfox. New Member

    Messages:
    1,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    id bet they dont know today.you ever see jay walking with jay leno? we got some stupid young folks in this country today.
     
  8. SouthGADan

    SouthGADan New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Lyons, GA
    Wow, amazing story. Sounds like his health is the only thing that slowed him down; I bet it would have been good to know him. It's amazing to me the way someone could live a life like that, put so much time into things, and yet, die unceremoniously like that and be gone. I know it happens all the time, but it's just hard for me to fathom.
     
  9. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    It happens all the time Daniel. All the time.

    Who would ya have rather known, a fella like that or some the more prominent folks you've heard or seen over your years. Somebody like Tiger Woods perhaps? He's a craftsman in his own right. Knows his woodie very well, has sharp tools, very good at building Master Bedrooms and excellent at tearing things down, like marriages.

    Gimme the guy you would never have heard about, were it not for CheapNDisgusting, any day the week. They are all around us and I am sure you know some of them if ya just look. Some folks call them "Common people"
     
  10. katfish ken

    katfish ken New Member

    Messages:
    4,092
    State:
    Paintsvill
    Russel thanks for sharing. I've done the same on occasions at auctions myself.
     
  11. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    Good Story and it sounds like a good auction.
     
  12. cheapNdisgusting

    cheapNdisgusting Well-Known Member Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    17,924
    State:
    Yonder in Mo.
    Name:
    Russ
    It was a good day. Glad I did it. Thanks for reading.
     
  13. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,758
    State:
    arkansas
    Name:
    johnnie
    no thank you for the trip it reminded me a lot of my granfather.i use to watch him for hours on end he just didnt live long enough to teach me how.thanks again.
     
  14. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    Excellent story!

    Reminded me so much of the first day wife and I went to the farm after my father in law's funeral. He was in early 80's, his wife had died 6 years earlier. He had always been in pretty good health, still took care of his farm. But strangely, only months before had sold off his cattle. While visiting his lady friend in town he had a stroke/heart attack, died 4 days later.
    We spent a lot of time walking around the house, garage/shop, storage building, barn and over the place looking at what all he had collected in his lifetime. We had seen it before but after his death it had a very different meaning. That's been 8 years ago, we should have already sold the place and had one of those sales. But it's hard to break the tie.
     
  15. puppypal

    puppypal New Member

    Messages:
    2,294
    State:
    Sheridan, Ar
    What a wonderful story. I myself find old quilts and try to find out the history of them. My passion. Women sitting around a beautiful hand stitched quilt......... quilting and talking gossip. The history of people to me, is what makes the simple things they own priceless
     
  16. pk_powell

    pk_powell New Member

    Messages:
    3,485
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks for the wonderful story,reminded me of my kinfolk that have gone on to their reward. I had an uncle that was a jack of all trades and master of none.Today his house stands abandoned and has for 5 years. I can't go see it as there are so many wonderful memories in that ole house,it would make me a lil sad.Oh for the good ole days!!:sad2::big_smile:
     
  17. Graham

    Graham New Member

    Messages:
    67
    State:
    Arkansas
    That old man probably served his country in his youth. He was probably an active member of his community. The craftsmanship he left behind tells you of the person he was. I think the state should put aside just a little of the money they make off his life's work in honor of his memory. Maybe plant a tree in his name, so someday he can provide another craftsman with a nice peice of wood to make something special.
     
  18. Pennspin

    Pennspin New Member

    Messages:
    64
    State:
    Alexander City Al.
    Thanks for the story. This reminded me of an auction I went to several years ago where an older guy had lived by himself for years. As with that auction too there were alot of nice things and I'm sure with each item there was a neat story, if we only knew it.
     
  19. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Thanks for the trip Russell. I've known a few of those kind of men in my short lifetime,They all carried a piece of my heart to their grave as well.
     
  20. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    I have to agree with Tanya. Thanks for the trip, seemed like i was there also.