Am I doing something wrong?

Discussion in 'Blue Catfishing' started by south_va_fisherman, Jul 28, 2007.

  1. south_va_fisherman

    south_va_fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    534
    State:
    Muddy Cross, Virginia
    I cant seem to catch any blues with any size to them, except a 22lber from a little lake. I have tried every rig I know of, and used everything from shad and herring to worms. I catch tons of 1-5ish pound fish with the ocasional 10lber. I am limited to the shoreline because my jon boat get tossed to much on the mighty james river. I have tried fishing 100yards off the shore with my surf rod and right at my feet. nothing big. I read on here of guy going out and catching 20, 30 and 40 pound fish, whats your secret?
     
  2. fishinjunky

    fishinjunky Member

    Messages:
    267
    State:
    Nebraska
    bigger bait? how long are you sitting in one spot before you move? are you fishing obvious public access? fishing hole, flat what structure? you should be fishing alot of current. try walking your bait. their is alot of factors that come into catching nice blues.
     

  3. spikespack

    spikespack New Member

    Messages:
    14
    State:
    illinois
    I have always said, Big Bait, Big Fish! You won't catch many 5-10# fish on a 1-2# cut bait! But the big boys love the big bait!:wink:Good Luck!! I use Shad and Mooneye.
     
  4. GUNTZ

    GUNTZ New Member

    Messages:
    169
    State:
    CLEBURNE texas
    YES BIG BAIT ,BIG FISH ,BUT YOU ARE CACTHING FISH AND THATS FUN
     
  5. south_va_fisherman

    south_va_fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    534
    State:
    Muddy Cross, Virginia
    its a WMA. There are plenty of beaches to fish off of. Is there a way to tell if there is some sort of structure out there? I just figured since small blues were there so were big ones, they just wont bite. As far as current goes, it is sort of like surf fishing with out big waves.
     
  6. Zing

    Zing Member

    Messages:
    327
    State:
    Tennessee
    I would try using a large bait under a slip bobber, you may have allready tried this. Have you been getting hits the way you are fishing and the fish dropping it? I had a problem in NC with channels doing that as soon as they felt any resistance they would drop the bait. I would use slip bobbers and also would rig up a strike indicator that would allow my line to be slack and when the fish would pick it up it would release my line and still have slack in it. I do not know if this helps but like the other post said use big bait.
     
  7. FATFLATTIE

    FATFLATTIE New Member

    Messages:
    2,170
    State:
    ILM, NC
    Big bait is the key man. Me and another guy were fishing this winter for blues and were only getting smaller ones, up to 10lbs and then we started using pieces of bait as big as our hand and the big boys started showing up in the same spots we'd been fishing. It keeps the bait stealers away and provides a big easy meal for that big cat which is exactly what he wants.
     
  8. south_va_fisherman

    south_va_fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    534
    State:
    Muddy Cross, Virginia
    I have been getting tons of bites with the fish letting go, like you said above. I have only tried a slip bobber a few times with no results, but i will definately give it another try with a big chunk of bait. I was thinking...since where i fish is just like surf fishing in saltwater, actually brackish, if i apply the same rules about sloughs and sand bars, is that where the big cats are?
     
  9. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    I'm not as convinced as the others that big bait is critical - it will help at times, but big fish can often be caught on small baits (like 1 by 4 inch cut bait). Stick with the local baitfish, though (shad, mullet, menhaden), and I still believe that freshness is critical.

    Big blues are maybe the toughest cats of all, in my opinion, and I'm sorry, but there's no way around it: when fishing a river (or anyplace else really) for blues you are at a disadvantage without a boat. This is for two reasons: 1) the best way to present a bait in a river is straight down current (easiest - it's not always being swept sideways), and that's usually almost impossible from the bank, and 2) a boat gives you the mobility to find and fish the productive structure instead of waiting and hoping the fish will come to you.

    The bigger blues usually seem to like ledges and fairly deep structure. Sometimes they will hang around the edges of a flat near a ledge or drop off, but they like that edge. See if you can find a chart of your area of the river that will show if there's a good sharp drop/ledge anywhere that you can reach from shore. Then, if you can get your bait near there, it will help.

    The fact that you are catching small blues really does not mean that the big boys are there, too. In my experience, they don't usually hang together. The smaller fish tend to run in schools in shallower water with a fairly flat bottom. The bigger fish are usually deeper. Sometimes big blues can be caught very close to the bank, but usually when that happens it's because there's are steep drop off or some other specific structural element that holds them there.

    You can catch big blues from shore, but it's going to take some thought and effort. Don't just head for a convenient access point and throw a bait in. Do some research and find structural elements (holes, ledges, etc.) that you can reach from shore, and concentrate there, and that will up your odds greatly.

    Good luck!