Aluminum boat

Discussion in 'Boating' started by GMC FishHauler, Dec 18, 2006.

  1. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    A local boat shop and some friends told me that the rivits on the bottom of my boat would produce alot of resistance in the water. Is there anyway to fix this?

    Also is there anyway to make my boat float more even? The back is much lower than the front when still and i have problems leveling out when open. I was going to try and relocate the batteries to the front and fix this.
     
  2. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I would think any resistance formed by the rivets would be inconsequntial. Sure, they will produce drag... but everything produces drag of some sort. I would say your not going to loose enough speed to even worry about it. To check the way your boat sits in the water, put it in the water completly empty and see how it sets. It should be just about level. If the stern is setting lower, you can compensate by balancing the load. The critical dimemsion if the freeboard, or the amount of space between the top of the water and the top of the boat at its lowest point. The more freeboard there is, the safer you are. If you ever get to where it is just a few inches, you need to rethink what your loading into the boat and try to reduce the weight. Be conscious of the max weight capactiy of your boat, and don't knowingly carry more weight. You may do it accidentally and hopefully you will live through that accident.
     

  3. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    i ran into problems this weekend while me and my friend were fishing. stern was about 3" above waterline. I am not that big (190lbs) and he is pretty big(270lbs) but besides us there was only 12 gals fuel, 2 batteries, and the necessary stuff to make boat legal. I figure if i move one or both batts bow (under the front compartment) then it could help. That is almost 60lbs relocated right there.

    My boat is rated for 600lbs of people and gear. I called dealership and they said that the fuel and batteries were included in boat weight not subtracted from the 600.

    I normally would not be worried about stuff like this but it was kind of choppy this weekend and had to run bilge a little bit.
     
  4. FishBrew

    FishBrew New Member

    Messages:
    329
    State:
    North Texas
    What size (lenght) boat? does it have any decking? What size motor? what size gas tank? Keep any water/livewell in the boat?

    Don't worry about the rivets having to much drag. If they don't leak, fish on.

    Normally the heaviest things in a boat ... you, motor, gas, batteries. Some can be moved, some can't.
    Can weight be added to the front to offset this? Maybe ... But no matter what, like Awshucks said, don't exceed the weight limit ... be sure to count yourself and a fishing buddy in your weight calculation.
     
  5. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    17' bass boat style, 1/2" sealed plywood decking but this is on the front and middle, 70hp merc., (2)6gal tanks, 10 gal livewell about half full this was because of fish.
     
  6. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    It surprises me to hear the weight of the fuel, etc. was calculated into the weight capacity. My understanding has always been that if it is something you put into the boat, you add the weight. That would include fuel and batteries. I don't think it would have squatted so low in the water if those weights were all ready calculated.
     
  7. FishBrew

    FishBrew New Member

    Messages:
    329
    State:
    North Texas
    help me out a little with "bass style" with no decking in the rear ... does it have a steering wheel (console), or is it tiller style (you sit in back to steer)? Are those built in gas tanks?
     
  8. wylie catter

    wylie catter Member

    Messages:
    675
    State:
    South Carolina
    Relocating those batteries will help a good bit. I don't blame you for getting a little nervous about it, 3" is not enough boat out of the water for me. I've never measured the height of my transom above the water, but it's around a foot. And I've been anchored before and had big wakes come up over the back of it.
     
  9. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    the decking on the rear is part of the aluminum that is built on the boat, it is pretty much wide flat bottom with slight V up front, looks like fiberglass bass boat but made of aluminum.

    The manufacturer said that the weight of fuel and the batts. was already factored in. I was thinking that it wasnt but they said it, and i heard it. Tanks are removable.

    I think alot of the problem was that too much weight from fishermen in the back half. I was in drivers seat and he was next to me in left side low seat.

    I am gonna move batts and see. if it doesnt help, no big deal, i will just sit up front and use trolling motor when i get one big enuff to move boat around in the wind.
     
  10. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Wow.:sad2:

    Your dealer is full of it. The maximum weight capacity given on the plate is for everything added after manufacture...persons, cargo, motor(s), fuel, battery(s), etc.

    Having said that, 600# sounds pretty low...but then again, freeboard doesn't lie.
     
  11. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    First I want to say the amount of freeboard you have dont mean squat.
    Bouyancy is what matters.
    Some of the alltime greatest hull designs for running the inlets and netting in the OCEAN have very low freeboards amidship and most of these designs were first built with oar power.


    Second, with you, your buddy and the gas you are at 532 pounds and we haven't even added the weight of the gas tanks themselves, the 70 horse motor or the two batteries and other gear.
    If the weight you specified for the boat is correct you are way over capacity.
    I dont doubt the capacity rating at all. I had a 17 foot fiberglass bass boat with a 850 lb capacity.

    Bassboats dont sit level in the water. The weight of the motor hanging off the back will see to that. You can put your batteries up front but a word of advice. You will need to increase your battery cable in size.
    Your batteries wont last long either. Wet cells dont take beats and bangs like associated with the bow of a boat on wakes very well.
    Gel cells will solve this problem. You can mount them on their side, upside down, or right side up and they'll take a whole lot more pounding then a wet cell.
    An example of the wire sizing.
    At 50 Amps you use a #6 copper for up to 5 feet which I imagine is what you currently are at.
    If you increase that distance from say 9-14 feet in length you'll have to make that cable a #2 copper. # 2 fine stranded copper or (welding cable) aint cheap.
    DC voltage drop is a whole different ball game then AC voltage drop.

    The bow on a bass boat is not a high volume bow meaning it doesnt hold the bouyancy of say a ski boat. You got to be careful about moving weight forward in a bass boat because it could easily make broaching a problem. Broaching is when you approach a wave instead of the bow cutting or ridng up the wave, the bow will plow the wave or "submarine".
     
  12. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    In a jon type hull, with very little reserve buoyancy, ample freeboard is a nice thing to have, actually.

    Freeboard amidships, and freeboard at the transom on a planing hull, are two very different considerations...apples and oranges.
     
  13. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    sorry, wanted to clarify something.

    Tag says 4 persons or 600lbs.
    1030lbs persons, motor, and gear
    80hp
     
  14. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    i also want to say thanks for all the info from everyone. you guys have been huge help. I am very new to boating (4 times out on water and this weekend was the first time with waves and someone on the large side.)
     
  15. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    The bow of the boat determines how low one can go.
    Today's boats are designed more for looks then function.
    The sleek corvette look of boats is nothing but eye candy for a buyer and boats that sell themselves from the dealer standpoint.

    The majority of people in the market for boats dont like what they would call old timey or traditional boats like the high bowed dories. They aren't as easy on the eyes as that sleek rounded out job. Well some of us like the look:smile2:

    There is nothing new or innovative in hull designs from a function standpoint although some manufacturers claim they have something no other has.
    The latest sales ploy I ran across was a dealer touting their stepped chines. " We invented the chine on this boat, Its a revolutionary breakthrough".
    Stepped chines have been around alot longer then I have.:roll_eyes: ( I fell off the tater truck, not the turnip truck).
    Its a sales market these days. Not a function market.

    Here is what I'm talking about when I say the bow determines how low one can go. This boat has alot of history behind it. A rich history. Designed and built by a cabinet maker. So functional this hull design is it turned into a legacy. This low freeboard boat was built for the treacherous currents, and shoaling in the NC inlets. They were paddled and motored through the inlets for offshore fishing and netting. You've got 40k boats that are bigger that cant go where this one can.

    So successful in function that a club was formed for people that either build these from scratch or restore originals. Some of the originals have wound up in other countries. They even have a yearly gathering of Simmons Seaskiff owners right close to our own Bobpaul.
    Notice the low freeboard, the motorwell, and the high bow. These things were run offshore all the time in the graveyard of the atlantic.
    Those high "ugly" bows are functional.

    High sides dont mean safe in high seas. High sides does mean you have a built in sail though. The more profile you show the more there is for the wind to grab. The bow meets the wave before anything else. We dont drive boats sideways or motor them through storms to get to a safe port in reverse either.
    If she'll track in a following sea (hard to find one of these "pretty" boats that does) and you have that "ugly" bow up front for a battering ram, you got something that is functional. It doesnt matter what the freeboard is or what she looks like. The term freeboard is used about as loose as the term deadrise by most people.
    Everybody looks at the back of the boat for deadrise. The back of the boat aint breaking the wave:lol: . The deadrise at the bow is the more important of the two. There again, the functional bow deadrise is them "ugly" ones like on lobster boats.
    Of course as with anything, you have the good and the bad. It helps to be a good captain.

    http://www.capefearmuseum.com/simmons_skiffs.htm
     
  16. KansasKatter

    KansasKatter New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    It never ceases to amaze me that people are so hung up on speed with a fishing boat, especially for catfishing. Of courst I am assuming this is the reason you are worried about drag from the rivets? The amount of drag this is causing you, and speed resulting from the drag is so minute, you will aquire more drag from a piece of mud, or a ding in your prop than the rivets of your boat.

    Besides, even if you are losing speed due to this, the amount might mean you are getting to your "hole" at the most 30-45 seconds later than if no drag, and that is on a long run!:wink:
     
  17. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    not concerned as much about speed as fuel consumption (only 12 gals.)
     
  18. KansasKatter

    KansasKatter New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    Gotcha! I have a 16' rivet jon, with a 25hp Mercury on it. Loaded with me (245lbs) my brother (200lbs) and all our gear, including a cooler of beer, bait, anchors, alum floor, you name it, we can buzz around all day long (and believe me we have) on 6 gallon can, and not even come close to running out of gas.

    I jumped to the conclusion of the speed thing due to past posts. Seems everyone is in a hurry to get some place on the water, half the fun is getting there!:big_smile:
     
  19. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    My boat is welded aluminum and had welding splatter on the bottom. I gained 15 mph by going over the bottom with a nylon buffer and removing that splatter. When I was done I coated the bottom with a product called -- Liquid Speed -- a teflon bottom paint. My boat went from 45mph to 60+ on flat water.

    I can see where rivits would take away some from the smoothness of the bottom, just like that welding splatter did.
     
  20. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    ^^^I agree, although at slower speeds, the effect will be less dramatic.