All you Military guys! Any experience with night vision goggles

Discussion in 'Boat Safety' started by loanwizard, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    As many of you know, I fish a medium size river with lots of shallows in a 20 foot boat that is too heavy to move if you make a mistake. I've tried 2 lights and 4 lights but the river still freaks me out at night. My next step is I have two remote control spotlights of which I wasnt to use 1. My intent is to use my 55 watt "docking" lights to point out the shoreline and use the spot for navigating the middle. I may possibly use two spots, one fixed on the shoreline the other for navigation.
    Tonight I was poking around ebay and found ATN Viper night vision goggle for around $300.00 shipped. My question is, Will I have a wider and/or longer range of vision, in other words can I see an obstacle far enough away to avoid it and will I have any peripheral vision. What I don't like about spots is the lack of ability to see the "whole" picture.

    Am I nuts, or does this idea have merit?

    Thanks in advance,

    Shawn(OH)
     
  2. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    shawn you keep adding to your light plant, and buy them googles your gonna look more like GI Joe than a fisherman:smile2:. you will have the fish so confused, they won't know if its day or night out. kinda like it gets in alaska:roll_eyes: rollo

    p.s you know im just picking at you bro.:wink:
     

  3. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    Shawn,

    If it changed from $300.00 to $3G it would be the system you see in your head. The image intensifier on the lower end civilian models wouldnt do what you want in regards to long range obstacle detection.

    You would need GEN III.

    Swap out the two floods with two I.R. lights.

    Depth peception would be more of an issue in monocular designs. You would want a goggle set.

    Your ultimate set:

    http://www.usnightvision.com/Night_Vision_Products.htm?PID=0000000071
     
  4. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    Generation I

    Amplification: 1,000x
    The early 1960's was witness to the beginning of passive night vision. Technological improvements included vacuum tight fused fiber optics for good center resolution and improved gain, multi-alkali photocathodes and fiber optic input & output windows. GEN I devices lacked the sensitivity and light amplification necessary to see below full moonlight, and were often staged or cascaded to improve gain. As a result, GEN I systems were large and cumbersome, less reliable, and relatively poor low light imagers. They were also characterized by streaking and distortion.

    Generation II

    Amplification: 20,000x
    The development of the Microchannel Plate (MCP) led to the birth of Generation II devices in the late 1960's and early 1970's. Higher electron gains were now possible through smaller packaging, and performance improvements made observation possible down to 1/4 moonlight. The first proximity focused microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier tube was an 18mm used in the original AN/PVS-5 NVG. Generation II+ provides improved performance over standard Gen II by providing increased gain at high and low levels. Generation II+ equipment will provide the best image under full moonlight conditions and is recommended for urban environments.

    Generation III

    Amplification: 30,000 - 50,000x

    The current state-of-the-art, the Generation III intensifier multiplies the light gathering power of the eye or video receptor up to 30,000 times. Requiring over 460 manufacturing steps, the GEN III intensifier is typically characterized by a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) photocathode, which is grown using a metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) process. The photon sensitivity of the GaAs phtocathode extends into the near-infrared region, where night sky illuminance and contrast ratios are highest. Sealed to an input window which minimizes veiling glare, the photocathode generates an electron current which is proximity focused onto a phosphor screen, where the electron energy is converted into green light which can then be relayed to the eye or sensor through an output window.

    The GEN III Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) photocathode is uniquely sensitive beyond 800 nanometers, considered to be the critical near-infrared region where night sky illuminance levels are greatest. This spectral response shift to the red region results in improved Signal-to-Noise Ratios over GEN III's predecessors, delivering a three-fold improvement in visual acuity and detection distances.
     
  5. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    Thank you, as always a much more in depth explanation than I expected.
    Now explain about an infrared light?

    I'll be back, going shoppin!
     
  6. jason berry

    jason berry New Member

    Messages:
    819
    State:
    Evansville
    Hes right when I seen the $300 I was thinking about $3500. I used some overseas they were pretty awesome had to carry a little battery pack around with them. I would love to have a pair.
     
  7. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
  8. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Infrared lights, while invisible to your eyes, acts like a spotlight for your night vision equipment. It's been 10 years since I was in and used them, but I think we had AN/PVS 7s (monocular) and they were cool - you could read the newspaper in pitch darkness. They had an infrared "flashlight" on them when it was really dark (no ambient light to amplify) you could turn on the infrared and it would "light" up the area for the night vision to work.

    One word of caution, if you do get night vision equipment and you get any kind of light shined at you plan on being blinded for a minute:wink: Since they amplify light somebody shining a small d cell flashlight at you from the bank looks like you're being shined with a giant spotlight:smile2:
     
  9. CoonX

    CoonX Member

    Messages:
    737
    State:
    Oklahoma City O
    Another thing about the cheap night vision, is that the lifespan is measured in hours.
    You can also look around and try to find a set of digital night vision goggles.
    Digital Night Vision

    :004:
     
  10. vlparrish

    vlparrish New Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    State:
    Bedford, Kentucky
    Shawn, believe it or not, you are already equipped with the best night vision on the market. Humans have great night vision capabilities, but we "water down" the ability of it by using light in everyday life. If you really train in low light conditions and use little to no light for your night time activities you will gain better night vision. When you shine that spotlight while you are running, your eyes are adjusted to great amounts of light. As soon as you turn the light off, everything is pitch because it is hard for your eyes to go from that kind of light to none. In reality without any light you will be able to see more structure in the dark than you can imagine. You just have to take your time and go slow. Vern
     
  11. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    i agree. i learned along time ago less light is better. i do however keep a search light in the boat for them really dangerous areas to find land marks. I have learned not to watch the water so much, but learn landmarks by looking at the tree tops. As long as I can see the tree tops, I know where I am. Now, this has came from years of being on the water. If I lose sight of the tree tops due to heavy fog, then im in trouble, and of course in fog, no spotlight is gonna help! rollo
     
  12. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    Those night vision will do you no good and you will get the tunnel vision just looking through them for any amount of time. Also night vision has no depth capabilities so you will not even be able to tell how deep something "appears" or accurate distance.
     
  13. Flatheadhunter33

    Flatheadhunter33 New Member

    Messages:
    3,764
    State:
    Yuma, Arizona
    NVGs are cool bro but your depth perception might be off for a while until you get used to them...then you might find them uncomfortable to wear also.
     
  14. cathooked

    cathooked New Member

    Messages:
    437
    State:
    north carolina
    i was gonna say see if ya can find a uh1 pilot and get his night vision they are awsome,and if ya can find em,better have a thick bill fold lol..
     
  15. Dave L

    Dave L New Member

    Messages:
    1,012
    State:
    Minnesota
    I'll also agree with these guys. When I run the river at night the only lights on are navigation lights. Your eyes do adjust, the best thing to do is, before you are ready to get under way. Shut off all your lights for a couple of minutes and just sit there and let your eyes adjust. Keep the spot lights off or you will just be blinded again.
     
  16. chambers bd

    chambers bd New Member

    Messages:
    1,134
    State:
    Sautee,Geo
    Hey Guy,
    Save your money and a 3.5 mcp hand held light with charger.
    The night vision your eyeballing is the not a good choice for your question on depht and distance. The night vision is great stuff if you got the real need.

    I dont see catfishing is really a good need for that kind of money for night vision.
     
  17. Storm27m

    Storm27m New Member

    Messages:
    92
    State:
    Wichita, Kansas
    I'm with everyone that says to spend the money elsewhere. You'd need good Gen 3 NVG's for them to be worth a darn, and even then, you still need some ambient light to see decently. On a pitch black night, NVG's aren't much better plain old eyesight. The lack of depth perception is also an issue.