Addition....

Discussion in 'LOCAL NORTH CAROLINA TALK' started by price, Jan 14, 2008.

  1. price

    price New Member

    Messages:
    175
    State:
    North Carolina
    With many surrounding states having some kind of catfish regulation, and the chance that NC may soon have one, add Alabama to the list of interested parties. I have a friend that fishes the TN River portion in Alabama and the state wants to put regulations in place similar to the state of TN. Here is the link.

    http://www.outdooralabama.com/news/release.cfm?ID=553
     
  2. Bryan8552

    Bryan8552 New Member

    Messages:
    422
    State:
    nc
    Price,

    Do you have any idea why the catfishes aren't given game fish status while fish such as white perch have it?
     

  3. price

    price New Member

    Messages:
    175
    State:
    North Carolina
    As is the case in most southern states, especially around the TN, Cumberland, Mississippi river basin (and others) catfish have been harvested by the millions by commercial fisherman. I know, my Mom's family is from Missouri and they were commercial fisherman on the Missouri River until it was banned in 1993. Catfish can't have a gamefish status and still be subject to commercial fishing. They can't take stripers, bass, crappie etc. because of their gamefish status. Times change though. Millions of anglers now view catfish as gamefish, and they fish for them just like bass and striper anglers. Catfish are not just viewed as a "meat" fish anymore. This website and the tons of people who view it are living proof of how much the sport of catfishing has grown. Many people, including me, feel as regulations get put in place (size/creel limits), and more people see all the sport anglers who catfish (for fun, tournaments, or trophy's) they will be regonized by many states as gamefish. Commercial catfishing will come to a close because they will be viewed like bass, crappie, and stripers. Anglers will always have the tradition of taking fish home to eat (just like people eat crappie), but I do not think over the next 10 years as things continue to change (attitudes) people will not accept the commercial harvest of catfish. The health advisories against eating catfish wild catfish, competition from farm raised catfish ponds, overseas fish dealers, plus the change in anglers attitudes towards catfish (sport) will deep 6 commercial catfishing. Just like if anglers saw bass or crappie being netted by commercial fisherman you would have to call in the army to protect them..slowly catfish will be held in the same light. It is already starting to change.
     
  4. Bryan8552

    Bryan8552 New Member

    Messages:
    422
    State:
    nc
    Commercial catfishing (traps) is big business on the James River in VA. Anyone who's ever been fishing there will probably agree that it's easier to catch blues there than anywhere they've ever fished (large and small). That has certainly been my experience with the place. With all that being said, the biggest problem I have with the commercial harvest from that particular river is with the health warnings. It's my understanding that you really shouldn't eat cats from the James. It's also my understanding that a commercial fisherman can sell his catch without any disclosure of where he harvested his fish. So, in essence, you can walk into a fish market thinking (or maybe without thinking) you're buying fish which are healthy to eat and in reality be feeding poison to your family! I'm in no way against commercial fishing, the opposite would be much closer to the truth. But I am dead against it being legal to sell poison food at the grocery store to a unknowing customer.
     
  5. price

    price New Member

    Messages:
    175
    State:
    North Carolina
    Who makes sure that the knives that clean the fish are safe (clean) and that the areas where the cleaning takes place is sanitary? Who inspects the fish before it is sold to the public. The answer right now is no one. NC has a statewide warning against eating wild caught catfish. A person who eats or buys the catfish is taking the "word" of a person selling that the fish are from legal/safe areas and the fillet process was sanitary. Check the internet for all the times that beef is pulled from "possibly" having comtamination. Just a hint will get beef pulled. Beef is also inspected, and the beef sellers areas are also inspected. I know someone in TN that turned a commercial fisherman in from Kentucky that went to a lake in TN with a contamination warning in effect-no catfish consumption, and no commercial catfish is allowed. He jug fished and caught/filleted out 1,000 LB's of bluecats, and was going to take it back to sell to the unknowing public in Kentucky. Or to stores that would cook the catfish, and the customers would not even know what they were eating! When I take my own fish home, I clean the fish, and I cook the fish, I know what I am getting myself into. I do not like eating something that I am not sure of. I only eat farm-raised catfish if I buy it from store. Here is something from NC about mercury in wild catfish that you should think about before you eat one or order catfish that you are not sure where it came from.

    How does mercury get into fish?
    Most mercury pollution is released into the air and then falls directly into water bodies or onto land, where it can be washed into waterways. When mercury gets into water, bacteria can change it into a form called methylmercury, which is absorbed by tiny aquatic organisms. When fresh water and ocean fish eat those organisms, the mercury begins to build up in their bodies. When larger fish eat smaller fish, mercury can build up to high levels in the tissues of the big fish. Because it binds to the protein in fish muscles - the 'meat' of the fish - mercury cannot be removed by cooking or cleaning the fish.
    How can mercury affect people's health?
    Mercury mostly affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, especially in unborn babies and young children. The more mercury that gets into a person's body, the longer the exposure time, and the younger the person, the more severe the effects are likely to be.
    Mercury is most harmful to the developing brains of unborn children and young children. Mercury can interfere with the way nerve cells move into position as the brain develops, resulting in abnormal brain development. Prenatal exposure to mercury can affect the way children think, learn, and problem-solve later in life. Effects can also occur in adults at much higher doses. The earliest obvious signs of mercury poisoning in adults are tingling or numbness of the lips, tongue, fingers, or toes; fatigue; and blurred vision.
     
  6. riddleofsteel

    riddleofsteel New Member

    Messages:
    353
    State:
    NC
    Check into the amount of mercury that is produced in Dental waste from unused filling material in dentist's offices. The ADA supports washing it down the drain!!!

    Tiny amounts build up in the environment, the fish and in us.

    THINK before you flush it!!