Abu Reel Number and Letter Meanings

Discussion in 'Fishing Reel Review' started by Tiny, Feb 18, 2007.

  1. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

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    State:
    Oklahoma
    Abu Number and Letter Designations and Meanings​

    Baitcast reels are also known as Conventional Reels or Multipliers. I think England and Europe refers to them as "Multipliers" more so than anywhere else, but if you hear the term used then you'll know what it means now without having to do what I did and say "What's that???"​

    The numbers on Abu reels are set as series first ... the first number means what size the reel is and each of the first numbers will have several models in that same spool size. For instance. 7000, 7001, 7500, 7800 and I think that's about all the different numbers in the 7000 series. The 5000 and 6000 series had over 100 different models in those series so I won't go through all of them but I'll give you and idea of what the numbers and letters represent. ​

    Starting off with the 7000 series reels. The 7000 was the base model number but it had several models that were labeled 7000's and most of them were 4.1:1 gear ratio which meant for every one complete turn of the reel handle the spool would turn 4.1 times. 5.3:1 means for every 1 complete turn of the reel handle the spool will turn 5.3:1 times. so the 5.3:1 is faster than the 4.1:1. How they achieve this is by making the gear that's being turned by the crank handle (the big gear) bigger on the 5.3:1 than the 4.1:1 and the small gear dog that engages the spool smaller on the 5.3:1 than the one in the 4.1:1 reels and sometimes the number designation or the letter designations change from reel to reel to signify that this model has 4.1:1 gears. It won't say that but when you're ordering parts for the gears or whatever you need from abu you give them the make of the reel or the reel foot number and that tells them what parts are needed for that particular reel so if you order parts for an abu reel be sure to have that reel in front of you when you call the 1-800-abugarc number. There are a lot of different reel foot numbers in the same model and series so you have to have the reel foot number to give to them because the very first abu 6500c3 has a few design differences over the years to the latest one. Probably about 8 to 10 different reel foot numbers over the years for the abu6500c3 so on some parts like the side plates and components in them may be different from an early model to a later model. I think the early 6500c3 had squared off side plates and some of the later ones had the ergonomic and even some of the later ones have the square ones like the 6500CSC3 mag-x is a later model reel but it has the square side plates and different clicker and stuff. ​

    The 7000c model was the red model and what the c signifies is that this reel has bushings that the spool turns on instead of bearings.​

    The 7000c3 has bearings instead of bushing and the color of the side plates are aluminum looking silver. ​

    The 7000c4 was the lever drag reels and they'll probably have LD on it as well but I don't remember​

    The 7001c3 just means that the reel is for left handed people the last number being 1 always signifies left handed reels.​

    The 7500c3 just means that the gear ratio is higher at 5.3:1 and the color of the side plates are chrome with black paint insignia.​

    The 7000ctc3 is the designation for non-levelwind reels. All of them with CT on them means they don't have a levelwind​

    The 7500ctc3 was black and I think they had higher gears. ​

    The 7800c3 was the exact same reel as the 7000c3 but had gold plated side plates and spool ... they were great looking reels. ​

    The reels with the N designation means they're the Narrow spooled reels.​

    So now we've got an idea of how this goes on the 7000's and I think I listed about all of them except maybe the Syncro and all the Syncro reels just had a weird drag release that would allow a fisherman to pull backwards on the handle to loosen the drag off. They didn't go over well I don't think. Too hard to work on and lots of problems with them. ​

    The CS designation on all abus was a counter to the CT counterpart when a reel was available in CT they also made one in that model as a CS model that designated that this was a levelwind reel when the same reel in the non-levelwind was the CT model. Confusing ain't it! Example would be the 6500CTC3 MagElite or Mag-X. They named them MagElite but due to a trademark infringement some years back, about 1999 or 2000 they had to change the name to Mag-X to avoid court battles so the MagElite is the same as the Mag-X but like I was saying the 6500CTC3 Mag-X was/is a magnet backlash controlled non-levelwind reel. It's counterpart with levelwind was the 6500CSC3 Mag-X. Now it makes sense doesn't it ... this is a special edition type deal where some people would want the reel in both levelwind and non-levelwind. The Non-levelwind version was popular with a lot of the Competition Casters that couldn't get the Ultramag III reels as they were discontinued many many years ago. ​

    6500csc3 Mag Levelwind reel.
    [​IMG]

    6500ctc3 Mag Non-Levelwind reel.
    [​IMG]

    The different between the 6000 and 6500 is the ultracast spool in the 6500's and the solid spool shaft in the 6000's. Below is a picture of the 6000 spool with the solid shaft on it. The bearings or bushings for this style spool were located in the side plates just like all the 7000 series reels. ​
    [​IMG]

    The designation of 6500 usually always meant that that reel had the UltraCast spool that slid onto the shaft that was connected to the right hand side plate and had the bushings or bearings located inside the spool as shown in the photo below. The numbers 13472 shows the bearings that are to be inside the Ultracast spool as well. This whole assembly slides onto the shaft that's on the right hand side plate.
    [​IMG]

    Some of the 6000's had ultracast spools too. Like the 6000c red model but it had bushings instead of bearings in the UltraCast spools. Which was about the only difference between the 6000c and the 6500c3 as well as the color of the side plates. The 6600 sports a heavier frame or is supposed to and some of the leverdrag reels are 6600's like the one shown in this photo below. The leverdrag reels aren't very good for casting or nearly as good as the 6500c3 or the ultimate casting 6500 which is the 6500ctc3(nonlevelwind)Mag-X or 6500csc3(levelwind)Mag-X. The leverdrag reels are more for trolling than anything as they're easier to back the drag off on and tighten it up when trolling so that it's easier to get the rod out of the rod holder by having the drag set lighter then tighten it a little to fight the fish once you get the rod out of the rod holder.
    [​IMG]

    There are literally too many differences in the 6000 series reels to list and a lot or most of them are marketing strategy to get people to buy more reels. For instance if they just made 7000c3 reels for that series then there wouldn't be any need for you to buy a new one when the 2 or 3 you've already got are working fine. Now if they throw another letter in there and change them just a little that will give you an incentive to buy a new reel. Some even get named 7000 Pro Rocket and change the side plate color and slightly higher gear ratio 4.3:1 which isn't even enough to notice. Some are limited editions. Some are species specific collector reels. These are all marketing strategy or mostly for that as people that catfish might be more prone to buying a 6500c3 catfish special reel when they've already got several 6500c3 reels. The only thing different there is that they've got the name stamped on them and maybe a little catfish logo.
     
  2. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    Placed a copy of Tiny's article here. Just click on the links for the pics and they should open for you. Lot's of questions for him so this will be the place to ask and answer. It's a great article. Below is the link to the library article. Thanks Tiny.



    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=40777.
     

  3. StormCaster

    StormCaster New Member

    Messages:
    364
    State:
    New York
    I don't where this comes from, but the 7000C has bearings. It has two spool bearings. The plain 7000 has bushings.

    The 7500C3CT never came in black. It was aluminum side plates painted blue. It is similar to the 6500C3CT that is known as the Blue Yonder. The only black side plate one was the 7500 CT Big Game.

    In regards to the 7000C3CT there was never one made. It was the 7000CT with two spool bearings. Many Abu guys that fish with the CT reel never consider this the true CT because of the top bar.


    As for the mag reels it was always call

    CS Mag or CS Mag elite for the levelwind
    or
    CT Mag or CT Mag elite

    Both are the same reels.
     
  4. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

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    1,532
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    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Now we need an article from Tiny on how to get the most distance from our reels and rods. His is some of the best stuff I've seen on reels and casting.
     
  5. rushing

    rushing New Member

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    561
    State:
    Minnesota
    Any idea on what a CL3 might mean? I have a 6501CL3, I suppose it could mean left handed but thats what the 001 means.
     
  6. catfishjohn

    catfishjohn New Member

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    10,217
    State:
    Greenup Co. KY
    I think the L is from wal-mart.All the 6500's I've got from there were 6500cl3 and from other places they were 6500c3.Not sure but thats what i've heard.
     
  7. StormCaster

    StormCaster New Member

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    364
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    New York
  8. rushing

    rushing New Member

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    561
    State:
    Minnesota
    Thanks! I got it off of ebay so it might have been from walmart originally. It also has a black spool which is different than any of the other 6501c3s I have had.
     
  9. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    I got with Tiny the other night, on BOC Chat, and was asking him about ID'ing the 7000 series reels. Possibly why he made this article. Anyway, the reel in question is a 7000c (painted on the sideplate), black, and it does have bushings. However, the sideplate also says "Stainless Steel Bearing Drive". The number on the "foot" is "70-00-07. Not sure how old the reel is, but am guessing it was made about 2000/2001.
     
  10. xringer3

    xringer3 New Member

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    950
    State:
    Oklahoma
     
  11. StormCaster

    StormCaster New Member

    Messages:
    364
    State:
    New York
    I suppose he was trying to help the confusion with Abu reel numbers. It is very confusing if you are new to Abu. Back in the early 70's I picked up my first 7000C. It has two spool bearings as that model designates with the letter C. The C3 has three and the C4 has four bearings, which most people know. The bushing reels can be upgraded as well as the bearing reels can be downgraded. I once upgrade a 7000 reel to a 7000C by replacing the bushings with bearings. There is some method to identify the reel year by the numbers etched into the foot as well as the dotted marks. Generally the older reels have the dotted marks.
     
  12. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

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    118
    State:
    Oklahoma
    you're lucky you got the black ones instead of the gold ones ... the gold ones had a lot of problems with the dog slipping inside itself when they first came out and I think the gold hs big game was mass produced for basspro and others but their parts were manufactured somewhere else besides switzerland ... they outsourced them somehow and .. well anyhow the black ones are better than the gold HS model big games that are being sold now. the black ones were built and tooled in switzerland I believe and they're solid reels. There were some gold plated reels that sold as 7800's several years back. There weren't very many of those made and they had 4.1:1 gear ratio like the 7000c3 with the only difference in them being the gold plating. The ones you see at basspro the 7000HSBG or whatever they are are just gold colored and not real gold plated like the 7800's. I think the green ones were B models and they had bushings instead of bearings like the red 7000C models that also had bushings. I think some of the walmarts carried the 7000B models as I think a friend of mine bought a green one from walmarts over in sand springs, OK. They're basically the same as the Red ones. There was a maroon colored 7000C3 also that came out before the aluminum colored 7000C3's also. Most of the Black Big Game reels were sold through small distributors and they were the original big game reels but I don't think they were any different than the 7500C3 as both of them has 5.3:1 gear ratios. Some reels were also for targetting the european market like the 7000 pro rocket which has 4.3:1 gear ratio and the cool name ... "rocket" ... I'm not sure why but they seem to be just like all the other abus except they have a lightly higher gear ratio than the 7000c3.
     
  13. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

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    118
    State:
    Oklahoma
    when I put C3 in there that signifies that they're bearing reels .. not that they're actually named C3CT.

    the first mag 6500's that came out after the deal with the trademark suit were renamed Mag-X ... they're now named Mag but initially they came out with the -X ... if you need proof of that just do a search on google for abu mag-x and you'll get a lot of pages come up about them. the name cycle was from MagElite to Mag-X then Mag

    I've worked on quite a few red 7000c model reels and all of them I worked on had bushings ...the C3 models are the bearing reels. the 7000C also came out with black side plates and they're also bushing reels. As for the 7500CTC3 being black .. I really can't remember for sure what made me think that ... I'll have to check on that but I'm pretty sure a few of them were sold with black side plates .. as for the side plate's color I really don't think that's a really big issue. I found where I got that from ... the schematics .. the 7500C3CT 901836 came in blue the 901836A came in black and the reason I post it as C3 is because it's got 3 bearings in it. all 3 bearing reels I call C3's ... some are labeled as such and some aren't but they're still C3 reels if they have3 bearings in them
     
  14. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

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    118
    State:
    Oklahoma
    the stainless steel ball bearing drive just means it's got one bearing in it ... that bearing is the big one on the crank. All C models are like that originally. If anyone's got a C model that has bearings in it then they've been put in there by someone other than abu. The drive bearing though is under the star drag area. if they had bushings in there they'd be hard to reel.

    on another reply where it said the pro rocket and 7000c3 were very different they may be but then again they may not be either .. if you had a new 7000c3 and a new pro rocket with both reels filled with line and set up identically and you hand them to a blind folded caster they wouldn't be able to tell them apart. I'm pretty sure of that.
     
  15. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

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    118
    State:
    Oklahoma
    stormcaster, none of the C models had anything but bushings in the side plates when they left the factory. the C3 models do not have three bearings on the spool .. they have two on the spool and one on the crank. C models have always been bushing reels and I've never ever seen one that was bought new with bearings in the side plates.
     
  16. StormCaster

    StormCaster New Member

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    364
    State:
    New York
    That C3 only has two spool bearings and one in the crank. Never have seen one with three yet. C has always been two bearings on the spool. What do you think the plain 7000 reel has?
     
  17. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

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    118
    State:
    Oklahoma
    There are serveral things you can do to improve performance in abu 7000c3 reels. C3 is a general term of a 3 bearing reel .. two on the spool shaft and one on the crank. the most important thing to do is to have the spool full of line or a little overfilled will cast even further. smaller line diameter also helps but you can't go too small becaue if you backlash a little with line diameter smaller than say .37mm or so the line can get between the spool and the frame of the reel and if this happens you should never pull on the line to get it out because it'll break the clicker spring as it seems to always get fouled on the clicker for some reason. I've messed up a couple of clicker springs by doing that so if you get line between the spool and frame never pull on it .. take the thumb screws loose and pull the spool out a little to get the line out.

    the smallest line you can use on a 7000c3 is 15 lb ande ... if you're using a surf rod you can use lighter line with a shock line of 50 lb test and tie it on the 15 lb test using an albright knot. Just do a search on the net and you can find animated gifs on how to tie an albright knot or just go to www.marinews.com and navigate through their site to the animated gifs there. when tieing on a shock line you want it long enough to make about 5 wraps on the spool and out to the end of the rod then back down to the reel seat is normally enough to tie on your terminal gear. the sinker should be on bottom with the hook tied onto the shock line with a dropper loop about 2 ft above the sinker ... for maximum distance with this rig the shorter the dropper loop the better off you are. if you use a long dropper loop the bait will helecopter behind the sinker and reduce casting distance dramatically. also larger baits will reduce casting distance like a large shad head will slow the cast down more than a shad fillet. also when casting a larger bait you have to have more backlash control. with a full spool of 15 lb test ande and one medium sized brake block and one small one. this is about as fast as you can get the reel with a shad fillet. you actually need two medium sized brake blocks in the reel with a full spool of line or overfilled slightly.

    now the size of the shock line all depends on the rod and the amount of centrifugal force you're putting on the cast. if you're capable of hitting 200yds with a large shad head then you'll need a 50 lb shock line. that's what I have to have when I'm casting that far with 6oz lead and bait. If I use 40 lb test it'll break on the cast every time. Now if you're capable of 150 yds then 30 lb test may be all you need. the rod is the most important part of this scenario along with good upper body strength, good hand eye coordination and a good amount of knowledge of centrifugal force.

    The unitech cast will generate more force than a hatteras cast for instance where the sinker is closer to the caster's body when the cast is made as it's more fluid as it comes around and creates a lot more stress on the cast than the hatteras cast as the hatteras cast throws the sinker out right before the cast is made causing the sinker to actually come back towards the caster and then out. I came up with a cast down at keystone long before I ever got involved in tournaments that was named the sleeper cast or swinging cast. They call it the swinging unitech now as it is where you swing the bait out and then back towards you and as it starts to fall away from the rod you cast and this cast generates a lot of centrifugal force and requires a really stiff rod to do it properly. flimsy rods don't cast nearly as far as stiffer rods like the breakaway rods compared to an eagle claw or shakespeare rod. also the oceanmaster 6 to 12 oz rods are that stiff. daiwa eliminator rods are stiff enough to do the swinging unitech also with a 6 oz lead.

    but back to reel tuning ... you want to also use an oil on the bearings that'll hold up and if you're using a levelwind reel you absolutely must keep them clean and can't haul them in the back of your vehicle without taking them off the rod and putting them in a camera bag that you can zip up to keep the dirt off them. just a little bit of dirt will ruin a levelwind worse than anything. I used several oils on my reels and the best I've used is 5w20 motor oil ... it protects the bearings and makes them cast really smooth as well. I also use a little more brake blocks, like two medium sized brake blocks and I'll put a drop of 3n1 oil on the brake blocks to make them run inside the brake drum more smoothly.

    you have to cast smooth also .. you can't cast a baitcaster the same as you do a spinning rod where you allow the tip of the rod to dip down like they do when the line is released on the spinning rods ... if you do it'll speed up the spool faster than the line is going out just for an instant and then when the rod tip flips back up you'll get a massive blow up. The release needs to be a slipping release so that the rod tip doesn't dip down at the end of the cast ... you'll start to let the spool slip at about 12 or 1 oclock and be off of it at 11 or 10:30 ... if your rod tip goes below about 10 oclock then you're line driving your cast. that means you're looking at the target instead of looking up at about 45 degrees ... always look up when you're casting a surf rod instead of at the water.

    Power generation should be mostly coming from your left hand when casting surf rods. when I'm showing people how to cast I say picture yourself bear hunting with a 14 ft stick and you're going to knock bear off a limb with that stick. you're not going to poke at it with your right hand or upper hand ... you're going to bring the rod around your body and using your right hand mostly for a fulcrum and pulling down hard with your left hand bringing the rod smoothly around your body instead of using the surf rod like a short pole where you're ending up looking like the statue of liberty with the right arm poking at the sky and left hand being the fulcrum. that's the way you cast short poles but not how you cast surf rods.

    the best tuning you can do on an abu 7000 is to overfill the spool just a little .. maybe 1/16th of an inch and two medium sized brake blocks and they'll cast a mile like that. the smaller diameter the line the better on casting distance ... you can't break 20 lb test with a surf rod's backbone so there's no need to use more than 20 lb test on a 12.5 to 14 ft rod .. shorter rods require heavier line per amount of pressure you put on the rod handle above the reel as the leverage on a short rod is about twice that of a surf rod .. you can put 20 lbs pressure on the surf rod handle and it'll equal about 5 lbs at the rod tip ... don't believe me? try to pick up a five pound weight with a surf rod and you'll see ... then try to pick a 5 lb weigh with a short rod like an ugly stick and it'll be twice as easy. some people think that since it's a longer rod they're able to put more pressure on the fish but that's not correct ... the longer the rod the less amount of pressure you're actually putting on the fish per lb pressure on the rod handle ... some will use 80 lb test on a surf rod when they can't actually put more than 20 lb pressure on the rod tip ... try picking up a 20 lb weight with a surf rod ... it's really hard to do and not a lot of surf rods could handle picking up a 20 lb weight.
     
  18. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

    Messages:
    118
    State:
    Oklahoma
    the C models are bushing reels the plain 7000's are the same as C models ... what do you think the B models have would be the same case "bushings!". If you have a 7000c with bearings purchased new like that then they may have come out with a 7000c model that had bearings in them but all the red 7000c models and black 7000c models I've taken apart were all bushing reels. is this reel you're talking about red or black? if its maroon then that's a c3
     
  19. PeZ

    PeZ New Member

    Messages:
    757
    State:
    Oklahoma
    One thing I can add to the number break down is any reel with # 4600, 5600, 6600 all have a thumb bar release which I prefer.

    The 4500, 5500, 6500, have side releases just thought u would like to know alot of people ask if it has a thumb release or side and this will answer that question.
     
  20. StormCaster

    StormCaster New Member

    Messages:
    364
    State:
    New York
    Really one has the bushing and one has the bearings :smile2:

    Really interesting stuff about distance casting from Tiny. I have found out over the years that changing the centrifugal brakes on the 7000 C3 from four to two of the smallest brake blocks or one fiber brakes really helps. I know a lot of the guys use that 3n 1 oil, but I use sewing machine oil.

    I much prefer the pendulum cast with a shock leader of at least six wraps on the spool and away from my thumb. I generally go with 10# shock leader per ounce, which as Tiny mentioned the 50# shocker is just right for 5 oz. I use 40# to avoid the larger knot if I am tying the Albright knot so it will not interfere with the levelwind. If you can really go without the levelwind the distance will be greater. Unfortunately Abu no longer makes the bigger CT reels for casting.