About pouring sinkers

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by ravenloft420, Apr 1, 2007.

  1. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo
    hey brothers, I am going to be pouring sinkers for the first time tonight and have read many many tuorials and all the precautions. I have everyhting I need but have a couple last questions.

    1. how often should I spray wd-40 on the hinges. (or would motor oil work better?)

    2.I will be makin flat no-rolls which require a core pin. I have read to keep the core pin oiled frequently as well. I have also read that even a small amount of moisture can cause a violent reaction with molten lead. so my question is...would oil have the same risks invoved? I know oil is not considered "moisture" but it IS wet!! I know this may be a self-explanatory question, but this is one thing that I DO NOT want to learn the hard way.
     
  2. Stubby

    Stubby New Member

    Messages:
    208
    State:
    Kansas, Ar
    Andrew I make the no rolls and bank and egg. the no rolls are the hardest to pour, for me anyway. The lead has to be hot and the mold itself has to warm up pretty good also. I usually warm the mold some with a torch and then start pouring. I got a little tub of grease setting where I can stick the pins in it and then insert them into the mold. You'll know when everything comes together heat wise. Theres a lot of guys on the BOC that can pour better than me but I get it done--You will too. Be careful it can hurt like h---. use gloves..
    Good Luck
     

  3. ryang

    ryang Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,289
    State:
    Blacklick, Ohio
    Name:
    Gary
    Andrew I went to a Sinker making party a couple of weeks ago (sound like a girley Party lite thing :lol: ), anywho when pouring the no rolls we would spray WD-40 :wink: on the pins about every 3 or 4 pours. Also had to wear some thick gloves on the hand that was holding the mold but using the ladel you didnt need a glove. They had another thing to pour with but the no rolls would not fit under it with the pins in it. Otherwise it didnt seem that hard just hot as H!@#. Just remember to be safe and the WD-40 might put some flavor flave on the sinker to lure the cats in :eek:oooh:

    If you dont want to torch the mold to warm it up just do a couple of pours and it will warm up Ok. Just throw the lead back in and remelt
     
  4. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I prefer motor oil for the pins and hinges. I lightly oil the pins about every 3 pours of lead, and the hinges about every 5 pourings. If it starts getting stiff or the pins are difficult to remove, oil them just a little more often. I don't like WD-40, don't know why, just a prejudice I have grown up with... LOL
     
  5. ryang

    ryang Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,289
    State:
    Blacklick, Ohio
    Name:
    Gary
    Oh yea even tho this is probably common sense remove the pin with the Gloved hand LOL otherwise you will be severly burnt
     
  6. hookman571

    hookman571 New Member

    Messages:
    176
    State:
    Maryland
    I poured 60 plus 10oz and 8 oz no roll flat river sinkers yesterday. I haven't poured sinkers since I was a kid and that was many moons ago. I set up with my Crab cooker and a thick cast pan that I purchased at Salvation Army. I was given my lead from a local tire shop (Old balance weights). I had to insert clips in my mold. I remember from long ago that the first pour never worked but I think it would have this time but I didn't put clips in. It went like clock work. I held the mold shut with a heavy spring clamp. My only regret is that I invited my Brother in law and he drank alot of my beer. I only have one good burn and about three small ones. That stuff is hot. I used motor oil but to tell the truth, the mold is so hot that it just seems to roll right off. Took the steel out of the molten lead and threw them in a bucket of water. No problems. Thanks BOC for some great advise.
     
  7. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,709
    State:
    Independen
    Good idea to wear gloves on both hands, and eye protection as well. You never know when something's going to happen!
     
  8. kdm75

    kdm75 New Member

    Messages:
    29
    State:
    north carolina
    I just tryied to pour no rolls over the week end and found out for me The mold has to be hotter for the no rolls rather than egg sinkers. To get a good pour for my no rolls the mold was so hot the pins would slide out with no problems. I used a pair of pliers to pull the pins I even got a peace of wood and drilled holes in it so I could put the pins standing up and just grab,um as I needed them.
     
  9. kdm75

    kdm75 New Member

    Messages:
    29
    State:
    north carolina
    One more thing get your self a round wooden stick it comes in hand for beating the sinkers out of the mold when the stick, and no damage to the mold. I used a thick mop handle about 8inchs long.
     
  10. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    If you were to use a candle and put a good coating of suet on the depression within the mold for the sinkers, they will flop right out. Suet stops the sticking. LOL

    I use a welding torch burning the acetelyene only. Talk about some carbon. WOW
     
  11. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo
    ok I did it. it was a little tricky at first but I got the hang of it. and boy are you guys telling the truth about having to get that no-roll mold hot. it took me about 10-12 pours before my first complete cast.I was actually starting to think that something was wrong with my mold hahaha. I only had about 2 lbs of lead but now I know how its done for when I get a bunch more. why are the no roles harder to make?

    and thanks for all the advice fellas
     
  12. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Perhaps because they are near a uniform thickness. Don't really know, but I can care less if my sinkers are wrinkled from a cold pout... bet they still weigh the same as the shinny ones, sink to the bottom, and hold the bait. What more could a feller want?
     
  13. JoshB

    JoshB New Member

    Messages:
    74
    State:
    Ohio
    yup. When I cast bullets the have to be uniform and perfect. Sinkers just have to be heavy:big_smile:

    Josh
     
  14. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    If you have trouble with the pins sticking, turn them before the lead has a chance to cool enough to really solidify well.
     
  15. FlusherX

    FlusherX New Member

    Messages:
    15
    State:
    Indiana
    Don't do like I did and think you can melt faster on the kitchen stove. I spilled it on the floor and ruined it. Still hearing about what a redneck I am.
     
  16. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    does melting lead produce any toxic fumes??
    someone told me u MUST melt it outside so that u dont kill urself.
     
  17. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

    Messages:
    7,782
    State:
    AR
    Work in a well-ventilated area. Lead can vaporize at elevated temperatures. Exhaust fumes to the outside.
     
  18. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    yes sir. lead should be vented well. i just do it out doors.

    i take a little dish and pour some oil on it. every time i pull the core pins i lay em in the oil. just keeps them lubed all the time. little trick i learned from whistler.
     
  19. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I don't know that lead fumes are toxic like nerve gas or such. BUT I do believe the warnings are that prolonged breathing of the fumes is extremely bad for the lungs and liver. Work in a ventilated area... if your not outdoors, have a fan in the window sucking air out of the room. AND hold your breath a lot. LOL
     
  20. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo
    lol I even have a fan when im doing it outside. Its a big shop fan and I have the back of it a little over a foot away from my workspace pointed toward the breeze direction. I turn it on low so it wont cool down my work area to much,it just sucks any kind of smoke or fumes away from me and blows them the other direction