A tip from your friendly butcher:

Discussion in 'The BOC Diner' started by kat in the hat, Jun 27, 2007.

  1. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    OK, before I was a meat cutter, other than steaks, I wasn't too savvy as to what cuts of meat are good for what. Since it's summer time, and everybody is grilling, I thought I'd share a tip about an often overlooked cut of meat....The arm roast. What is it good for, you ask? Well, for starters, it's the best cut of meat to be used for kabobs. It is suprisingly tender and juicy. More tender than sirloin, and alot cheaper too. Thing is, it doesn't have alot of flavor, but no problem because it lends itself perfectly for any marinade that you choose.(I like mustard sauce, or teriyaki) Just make up your skewers, and slap them on a HOT grill, real close to the flame with the lid open. Cook 'till your veggies are good and caramelized, and the meat is medium. MmmMmm good!:roll_eyes:Also, this is the best cut for fajitas, or chili, or stew, and the list goes on. If you have been useing top sirloin, or sirloin tip(yuk), next time try the arm roast. It is the best for all sorts of cooking applications. I would not lead you astray. Select grade is good, but request choice if you can. It's still inexpensive. Often you will be able to find it on sale for $1.79-$1.99/lb.
     
  2. teaysvalleyguy

    teaysvalleyguy New Member

    Messages:
    9,751
    State:
    GC, OHIO
    Thanks for the tip. I worked at Kroger for 6 months in the meat dept right out of high school. It was a good time. Learned alot from those meat cutters.
     

  3. Smuggo

    Smuggo New Member

    Messages:
    114
    State:
    sc
    More meat tips please...I'm a little lost when selecting cuts of meat, always opt for what I know to be good. I've heard the old mantra of "farthest from hoof or horn" but can't use that as I don't know which cuts fall into that category...also heard that blade roasts are good, the larger the blade bone the better.

    Speaking of steaks...maybe it was on the BOC but I heard of someone cutting catfish into steaks. Was wondering if they hold together well enough to cook that way????
     
  4. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Kat: That was really nice and helpful. I for one appreciate it. As Smuggo says give us more of this info. You teach me about meat, I'll teach you how to stroke that axe.
     
  5. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    Hmmmm. That was the best tip that I have.:confused2:Avoid sirloin tip at all cost! It is useless...at least to me. It's rubbery, and tastes like liver, or heart, or something. I cringe when I see somebody buying it.:embarassed: Blade roast IS good. That is part of the arm roast. Around here, beef doesn't come with a bone anymore, which sucks!!! That bone adds so much flavor to everything. It should be a sin to remove the bone from a chuck, or arm, but apparently the industry has found a better use for it???:crazy: FAT! Here's a tip. Everybody always asks for a good lean cut of meat. Bad idea when it comes to beef. Good marbeling of fat is essential to flavor and tenderness. Not to say that big globs of fat is good, but I will not suggest a lean piece of beef like sirloin, or sirloin tip to anyone. Some people love top sirloin, and it can be good, but I don't suggest it to anyone simply because there are better choices for less money.

    Also, something about giving tips on cuts of meat, things are called different names in different localities. An example of this is charcoal steaks, and patio steaks. They are also from the shoulder clod, which is the arm and top blade attatched. Charcoal steak here is the arm, and the patio is the top blade. I don't know what it is called somewhere else. When the blade is filleted down the center, it can be scored to make "western style ribs", which are the bomb,(one of my favs) or not scored and they are "flat iron steaks", which are also bombdigity. The shoulder is often overlooked because people just don't know what to do with it, or think it's not very good, but it is. Besides ribeyes, loin strips, or t-bones,(these cuts are from the back, and where the saying "farthest from the hoof is best" comes from) any cut from the shoulder is best, and most versitile. As far as potroast is concearned, arm roast is still a very good choice, but I prefer chuck roast because it is more fatty, and has more flavor, but avoid chuck steak. I don't know what they are thinking trying to eat chuck as a steak. If it can't be eaten medium rare, it ain't a steak to me. JMHO.

    A good cheap substitute for a ribeye is called chuck eye. They are good steaks, but if you ask your butcher for one, you may get nothing but a silly look like "What the heck are you talking about?" If you can aquire chuck eyes, they are good steaks, but are awesome as a roast with a dry rub, and roasted slowly to medium rare. These must be choice, or they could be tough, but not usually.

    And one more tip...:big_smile:...Avoid stores that don't employ in house meat cutters!!! For a couple of reasons. 1) Most large meat packing facilities employ huge numbers of illegal alliens. They all do. And especially Tyson foods which is what Wal-Mart uses. Support your local economy. 2) Pre-packaged meat is injected with CO2. That in itself is not harmful, but the meat does not oxidize, so it's impossible to be able to tell by looking how fresh it is. You could easily be eating 2 month old meat, and not know it 'till the multiple trips to the bathroom sets in.
     
  6. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    I hope this works, but here's a downloadable beef cuts chart just incase you are curious as to where exactly each cut comes from, and what to do with it.http://www.beefretail.org/uDocs/bmezretailcutchart.pdfOn the chart, what we call "arm" is called "shoulder", just for refference. A shoulder steak is a charcoal steak, and a top blade is a patio steak like I already mentioned.
     
  7. catfisherman60

    catfisherman60 New Member

    Messages:
    1,348
    State:
    Greenwood AR.
    Thank kat in the hat.I feed a calf out every year. the last was 1100#. It was aged 21 days it sure was good. thanks for the tips.:big_smile:
     
  8. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    thanks alot!! I have a chest freezer and when the local grocery is having a buy one get one sale in the meat dept I usually stock up and vacuum seal it for later. I love my kettle smoker but always stayed away from roasts. whats good for slow cooking in the q?
     
  9. rich-online

    rich-online New Member

    Messages:
    343
    State:
    California
    Catfish steaks hold together quite nicely. There is a classic Chinese catfish dish in which one cuts the fish into steaks, sautes pieces with black bean and garlic, and then arranges the cooked pieces back in order on the platter so it looks like a fish. Of course, the head and tail are cooked along with everything else.

    -- Rich
     
  10. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    For slow cooking in the "q", you can't beat a brisket...if you can keep the grill at a constant temp. long enough. A chuck eye roast would be good, or a 2" thick strip or ribeye. I don't do much slow cooking, so I may not be much help. How 'bout a pork butt? Slowly cooked, and pulled, and drenched in bbq sauce. Hard to beat there. Oh, I almost forgot about London broil, which is a top round roast about 2" thick. London broil is actually a recepie, not a cut of meat, but top round is best for it.
     
  11. catfisherman60

    catfisherman60 New Member

    Messages:
    1,348
    State:
    Greenwood AR.
    pork butt is hard to beat cooked 12 hours and pulled with some bbq on it now thats good.
     
  12. pythonjohn

    pythonjohn New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    11,533
    State:
    F L A Swamps
    Good old fashion hamburger does wonders for me on the grill.
     
  13. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I am into slow smoking all sorts of stuff ,pork butt ,excellent choice and briskets ,ribs both beef and pork. as well as a beef roundroast .the key is long constant temps [which I get by using a propane smoker] but hicory,mesquite and pecan wood make it real good i switch around on woods as i like to see which smoke is best with each meat. hope this may help some of ya.
     
  14. Pirate Jerry

    Pirate Jerry New Member

    Messages:
    613
    State:
    Yulee Florida
    For the BBQ I would recommend pork butt, cover with your favorite dry rub and put it in a plastic bag in the fridge over night. I put mine in the smoker over a drip pan and cook it using indirect heat at 220 to 225 degrees for 12 to 13 hours. Lots of work but its real bbq.
     
  15. wirehead80

    wirehead80 New Member

    Messages:
    17
    State:
    Michigan
    dont forget the slaw :smile2:
     
  16. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    do you prefer a vinegar sauce or bbq sauce on your butt?
     
  17. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    great tips. i learned how to butcher deer by a 30+year seasond veteran butcher.

    now i do some for friends. knowing cuts is great cause lots of meat that used to go to burger now goes to my plate as whole grain meat.

    the front shoulder contains a strip of meat on one side of the paddle shoulder bone. that used to be burger. thats the chuck tender of the animal. i now cut these into small butterfly chops. "chuck tender chops" there awesome. or sometimes eat them whole and sliced.

    in the hind quarters the goose egg muscle that can be pulled out by hand. used to get sawed in 1/2 for a roast with the other meat on the top of the rump. well thats the sirlion tip of the animal. talk about good steak thin sliced. makes a good roast if ya cook it rare and you can lard it. "make slits and pull pork fat strips through it" then i cut off a rump roast and take round steak off the lower quarter. ever had prime rib from a deer? i make a roast from the two prime rib strips of venison tied togather with butchers twine.

    i make my own jerky, snack sticks, summer sausage , breakfast sausage, and grind my own burger. just got my new l.e.m. meat catalog today with all the seasonings and supplies in it. this year im taking a whole hind quarter and making a deer ham. im even gonna try and make deer hotdogs. speaking of meat i need to call bloomington meats and get my order in for 30lbs of beef fat and 20 lbs of pork fat. it goes up a lot during deer season and they wont even sell it during firearm season.

    knowing how to butcher and where cuts of meat are is just an invaluable book of knowlage. i butcher a whole deer in 2 hours from skin on to freezor. that doesnt include any special items like sausage or burger. thats just the roasts, steaks, chops, and getting the meat ready for grinding. i do that the next day or two. i never cut through a bone. thats the cool part. the carccuss is on one piece when im done less the front legs. they come out first. its just like filleting a fish. i take the two sides of meat off in one piece totally boneless and seperate the meat from the inside out. illl probably do a library post on that with the first kill of this season.
     
  18. TDawgNOk

    TDawgNOk Gathering Monitor (Instigator)

    Messages:
    3,365
    State:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    Mr friendly neighborhood butcher, can I ask a silly question???

    What is up with the "Omaha Steaks"?? Are they really that much better? What do the different grading systems mean? Basically, what is the best way to pick a really good cut of meat?
     
  19. Arkie55

    Arkie55 New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    Mississippi
    This is really an outstanding post. Very helpful tips and we can learn a lot of each other. I know we have a lot of big game hunters here and most of us probably butcher our own. I look forward to learning how others "process" their game animals. I do butcher my own, even the griniding. Takes about two to two and a half hours.
     
  20. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    Anyone know how to make corned venison. Ive had it before and it was really good. I do process my own deer also and would like to make some this year.