A couple of tips on your batteries, some may know and some may not.

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by Big Dav, May 19, 2008.

  1. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

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    1,016
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    I figured I would pass these little nuggets along. Some may find them useful and other may find them useless.:eek:oooh::roll_eyes::crazy::big_smile:
    So here goes!

    1. Do you leave the carrying straps on your batteries? I don't, no sense giving a thief a nice handle to carry the batteries with. If they are going to try and take them they are not going to use the straps.:angry::big_smile::eek:oooh: If I need to pull the batteries I keep the straps at home for that purpose.

    2. Do you use the butter-fly (wing) nuts that come with the batteries? Again, I don't! I replace them with lock nuts and split ring lock-washers if possible, this will serves two different purposes. One it makes it harder for a thief to take the batteries with out some sort of tools. Second it eliminates the possibility of the nuts becoming lose. Lose battery cables can and will cause you problems. I just have to make sure that I have the correct size wrench to remove the cables (nuts) if I need to do so on the water.:eek:oooh::wink:

    Both of these tips are probably more useful for folks with on-board battery chargers (which I highly recommend a quality on-board charger). If you need to remove your batteries every time to charge them, these tips would be more of a hassle than useful tips. Still be careful that the cables are always tight on the batteries.:big_smile::wink:

    3. Always check the water level on a battery (unless it is a gel or maintenance free battery) before you put it on charge.

    4. Regardless of the cost or quality of your batteries, they are only as good as the charge you provide them. :wink:

    Hopefully these will be useful to someone.

    Thanks
    David
     
  2. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

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    Do Not run your batteries dead. I learned this from a friend that has a battery store here in my town. If you do this you will kill a cell or more. AGAIN, charge your battery as much as possible, whenever as possible.
     

  3. ho_shi

    ho_shi New Member

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    State:
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    thanks yall for the great tips, never thought of the lock nut, my wings always coming lose

    also i use the stay n charge system to keep my batts totally charged and "topped off"

    pm me for more info if yall want it
     
  4. catfishjohn

    catfishjohn New Member

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    10,217
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    I nominate that to be placed in the library. Excellent write up Dave! Reps were sent to ya!!!:wink::smile2:
     
  5. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

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    14,592
    State:
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    Thanks for the good tips Dave. Your ideas of security will work for an opportunity looking Honest person. A thief will just cut your cables a little longer and carry the battery away. This will cost you a battery and cables. Another suggestion is to charge all batteries on first returning home. Don't wait for two or three days to charge.
     
  6. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
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    Mikey, You are 100% correct.:big_smile: This will only mean the thief will need to be prepared with at least some tools or cutters. If the thief is that serious nothing is going to stop them. This will only be helpful for the passer by that might be looking for a free battery, etc. Most of the time if its not scraped, locked, screwed and glued down it fair game for s thief.

    Every year there are several batteries taken at our campground and the campgrounds around us at our closest lake. Some from the dock and some right on the trailer. The wing nuts are always removed and the cables not cut. If the thief was packing a cutter why not use them?:eek:oooh:

    The idea on replacing the wing nuts is more than just protection from a thief. It keeps you cables tight. I know on my 70 horse Johnson (probably applies for all models), I was told that lose cables would and could cause the voltage regulator to go out. Apparently that was and is a common problem. I am not a marine engine mechanic and by no means an expert. Just passing on what I was told years ago and what has been working for me. I have never had to replace a defective voltage regulator on any of my boats. Thought I had one go down one time but it turned out to be another issue.

    Just thought of another tip. You should never charge a frozen battery. (so I have been told):big_smile::wink:
     
  7. Brentkeele

    Brentkeele New Member

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    State:
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    very educational thread. Thanx guys.
     
  8. ho_shi

    ho_shi New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Texas
    i actually took my handles off my bats today at work and changed my wire ends to loop ends , just need to get the lock nuts now



    what size are they??? i tried getting wingnuts and had to buy 2-3 sizes b4 i found right ones and now i forgot sze
     
  9. swampratt

    swampratt Member

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    State:
    oklahoma
    Thanks for the tips..:big_smile:

    All my vehicles that i use to pull my boats. I have set up for dual batteries, one for the boat and one for the vehicle , always charged and ready to go...

    I also have an inverter 2000w continuous..so i can use my power tools and chop saw wherever i go ... and it will run my lincoln 110 mig with flux core .( real handy for roadside repairs).works better with 2 batteries
     
  10. wesmcbride28

    wesmcbride28 New Member

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    22
    State:
    West Virginia
    Not sure if this is true butt I have heard not to leave your battery on the ground because it somehow makes them go dead. Is this true or false?
     
  11. hunted

    hunted New Member

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    1,943
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    you should take at least the positive or the negative off.you could have something drawing amperage in a small amount when it is not even running.which is called a parasitic drain.for example,an alternator or starter could work fine,but still have a small amount of current running through it when not in use.the only way to tell is get an ohmeter and test out the circuits when the power is off to see if there is a drain on the battery.
     
  12. Skunk Master

    Skunk Master New Member

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    3,366
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    If your trying to charge a frozen battery then you need to throw it away.. A good battery won't freeze.. Unless it is completely discharged and then its too late..
    Todays battery cases are made of a different material, so setting them on the concrete or ground for extended periods won't drain them like it used to years ago.. Never store a partially discharged battery, always charge it first..
     
  13. hunted

    hunted New Member

    Messages:
    1,943
    State:
    washington court house,oh
    the only thing you will accomplish charging a frozen battery will blow it up.
     
  14. MSgtCatfish

    MSgtCatfish New Member

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    State:
    Alabama
    Big Dave,

    Good tips. I have a MK 440 on board charger on my boat. And if anyone out there has the room I recommend getting one. Absolutely save you time and your back. Must have in my book. Then you can put the nuts on like Big Dave was talking about, will call it keeping the honest people honest from not trying to take your battery LOL!
     
  15. Tyme2fish

    Tyme2fish New Member

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    125
    State:
    Greenville,Indi
    I read that this was true with older batteries. A "wet" battery would discharge sitting on concrete or the ground. Supposedly newer batteries do not do this. But why leave a battery sitting on the ground?:embarassed:
     
  16. elizabuilt

    elizabuilt New Member

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    63
    State:
    Norton, OH
    Thanks for the battery tips. I would like to add one, You should charge your batteries no more than five hours after use for no longer than eight hours with a ten amp battery charger. This is what the guy at the baitshop I got my trolling motor from told me he said he has had batteries that lasted seven years, and he has always done it like this.
     
  17. Skunk Master

    Skunk Master New Member

    Messages:
    3,366
    State:
    Colinsville, Il
    If you use a automatic charger, it doesn't matter how long you leave it hooked up it will shut off when the battery is charged.. I'm a service tech for industrial batterys and chargers.. Thats all I do 8 hrs a day is work on batterys and chargers..