93-pound Blue, 14-year-old specimen

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by ShilohRed, May 25, 2007.

  1. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
  2. STUMPKNOCKER

    STUMPKNOCKER New Member

    Messages:
    200
    State:
    Georgia
    Striper fisherman are converting everywhere:smile2:
     

  3. teaysvalleyguy

    teaysvalleyguy New Member

    Messages:
    9,751
    State:
    GC, OHIO
    Definatly a big fish, thanks for sharing.
     
  4. Wil

    Wil New Member

    Messages:
    1,746
    State:
    Minden Nebraska
    thats a huge fish
     
  5. catchinghogs

    catchinghogs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    Wow only 14 years old and that big thats amazing.
     
  6. Phil Washburn

    Phil Washburn New Member

    Messages:
    7,680
    State:
    Shawnee OK
    sure does, Pete! 14 years old...hmmmm...makes it a little harder to argue for cpr on all big ones, doesn't it?:smile2:
     
  7. rebelzgrl76

    rebelzgrl76 New Member

    Messages:
    1,359
    State:
    CO
    a picture

    A Picture of that thing would've been nice.

    Thanks for sharing very interesting
     
  8. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    That sure seems young for that fish. Maybe because he was one of the first he had very little competition and was able to goet lots to eat and grow quickly?
     
  9. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    Actually, i could make an arguemnt for releasing the big one from this - one of the reason to release the big guys is that they may have superior "big fish genes." If this fish grew that big that fast, then I hope he/she passed those genes along to lot and lots of babies before being eaten!!
     
  10. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    It just goes to show you. All big fish are not that old. But it has to do with what waters it comes from.
    Take a river or lake with plenty of bait fish. And the fish will grow faster then other places.
    Back around 1980 or so. The University of Tn came and did fish samples with me and my dad. 2 people with each of us in our boats.
    They would clip one side fin off each fish that was caught. Then then write down there weight and length.
    From there studies the fish here below Pickwick dam. Were growing fast . Lot of fish were young fish and not that old.
    Wish I had the studies from that research now.
    But like JAinSC a fish that is growing that fast is a better fish.Or I think it is. And I am sure it did pass on the Genes .

    Pete
     
  11. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    Great story! I would have a hard time eating a 93# catfish. I guess if you're gonna haul the thing around that long, it ain't gonna survive anyway, might as well eat it. I have no problem eating a 50# flathead. I don't feel bad about that until it's all gone, and my belly hurts. I don't think that biologists can estimate how fast catfish grow after 5 years of age other than genetics, and environment both play a role.
     
  12. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    You have to be very careful with aging cats from spines, though. First of all, they have to get the right in next to the socket, otherwise it's like againg a tree based on a cross section 15 feet off the ground (you miss the first rings). The other thing is that a lot of times when the cats get big and old the bone becomes hollow so the early rings are lost. Otoliths (ear bones) are the best way to go, but then you have to kill the fish. Even with otoliths, you have to know what you are doing. If the section through the otolith is not in the right place, you still won't get a good age. And, the older a fish gets, the harder it is to get it right: the rings get thinner and real close together and harder to read.

    (In case you haven' t guessed, I'm a fishery biologist. I don't work on cats, though. We work on inshore saltwater sportfish like flounder, spotted seatrout, and red drum. Our lab processes thousands of otoliths a year.)
     
  13. flathead man

    flathead man New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    ohio
    Yes its a big fish but why did they have to kill it? ...just to know how old it was? what happend to cpr? if people kill to many of the big fish we will have no fish for the future of tomorrow? i personaly dont keep any over 5lb and dont keep any flatheads cuz of how long it takes for them to grow to monster size well thats my oppion hope it dont offend anyone....flathead man
     
  14. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    Thanks for sharing the story pn that big fish. I to was surprised by the age.:big_smile:
     
  15. three_rivers

    three_rivers New Member

    Messages:
    688
    State:
    Tupelo Ar
    The old virginia record (or it may of been west virginia pardon my crs) was aged at 11yrs old at 90 some odd pounds....... From what i've read and studied its suggested that catfish grow exponentially as they age.
     
  16. GETHOOKED

    GETHOOKED New Member

    Messages:
    548
    State:
    Arizona, Scott
    Great story and what a fishing trip he had three big blues. I wonder if he kept them all. THat is enough meat for the season +!!!! Wish there was a picture
     
  17. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
  18. onlyriverfish

    onlyriverfish Member

    Messages:
    319
    State:
    Nebraska
    Name:
    james
    Putting on that much weight so fast is interesting for sure and why I believe it tells more about the fish and the fishes environment then any other available information (currently). Especially re river fish that have a vast range to live in.

    JAinSC, bet you are right on about that!

    "Maybe because he was one of the first he had very little competition and was able to goet lots to eat and grow quickly?"
     
  19. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I believe in fertile waters like I believe in fertile fields.
    You have fields that have a hard time supporting broom straw and you have fields that produce crops alot better then other fields you plant on with half the fertilizer.

    You can see this fishing ponds with different colors of water like acridic water to the muddy clay soils.
    I've always found the fish to be of higher quality that grow in acridic water and they grow fast.

    So much time, energy, and money has been spent on bass studies across the nation it makes you wonder if somewhere along the line the general one pound per year rule was borrowed from the bass and given to the catfish.
    Flatheads are eating machines. I would imagine where food is plentiful and the water quality supplies their needs their growth rate would be pretty rapid.

    Ever heard of fertilizing fish? I've played around with my 2 waterholes (stock tanks to you folks from Texas). One is a 1000 cubic yard and the other a 3000 when they were dug years ago well before my time with mule draglines.
    They'll receive anywhere from 200-400 pounds of fertilizer a year each.
    Slit the bag with a knife and chunk the whole bag and all in. I also lime them.
    It has had an impact. It darkens the water and the fish grow faster and larger then ever before in these waterholes. The only downside is that it fertilizes anything else in the pond you dont care to fertilize like some aquatic plants and algae. Thats where the herbicides come in.

    The same principle of soil quality has been found to be the largest factor associated with antler growth. You can really see it in NC's deer herd from the mountains to the piedmont to the coastal plain, and the river basins.
    One example is the quality of deer coming out of the Roanoke river basin.
    Its fed from the mountains of Virginia primarily. Those soils that have washed down over 1000's of years are unique to the basin and it has impacted those deer living in the basin in a positive way.
    Just because you plant plots of Pennington doesnt mean the deer are getting much value out of it. The value is going to come from the soil. The soil makes the plant.
    I believe fish respond in the same way.