3 spikes this season

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by Ace, Oct 22, 2006.

  1. Ace

    Ace New Member

    Messages:
    881
    State:
    Gastonia N
    Got a third spike this year one of his horns was broken off. Plus I got a good Bob cat.

    :big_smile:
     

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  2. blackhorse83

    blackhorse83 New Member

    Messages:
    1,008
    State:
    missouri
    Awesome cat, they sure make nice mounts!!
     

  3. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    three spikes in one season makes for one six point in my books and the same amount of meat too brother good going
     
  4. bud1110

    bud1110 New Member

    Messages:
    1,096
    State:
    East Texas
    Great pictures Ace, Thanks for sharing..
     
  5. savage308

    savage308 New Member

    Messages:
    399
    State:
    Victoria, Texas
    It's simple game management folks. That spike he shot is a 1-1/2 year old deer. It needs to be taken out of the gene pool. They have wildlife management courses at most colleges. May do you some good. Definately couldn't hurt.
     
  6. billcatfish

    billcatfish New Member

    Messages:
    1,571
    State:
    evansville Ind
    nice cat thanks for sharing
     
  7. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,711
    State:
    Independen
    There's a deer breeder in Illinois that raised a buck(I believe they named him Goliath) into a 220 class monster. That deer started life as a SPIKE buck. There is no proven evidence that removing spikes will help your herd. Maybe the spike hunters need to take the "wildlife management classes".
     
  8. CatfishHateMe

    CatfishHateMe New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    Il
    good points, both of you guys, but, where i stand is pretty much in the middle, if you own land and you want to rid of all the spikes in a herd then feel free to do so. but please dont go on public land where some of us hunt and go blasting spikes away like their dang field mice. also if you hunt around alot of other people, respect them to. talk to them in the summer and spring if they are good people to and maybe youll have the same views on the deer that are more than likely on BOTH of your land.
     
  9. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,711
    State:
    Independen
    Ace, nothing personal towards you-congrats on your deer and cat. I would like to know why two posts were removed from this thread though.
     
  10. SkiMax

    SkiMax Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,012
    State:
    Rising Sun, IN

    That is in a controlled environment. Spikes is actually a qualitative trait and I am pretty sure epistasis is involved. bottom line-they are detrimental to a population. But environment has alot to do with these sorts of things, not just genetics. I say take them out. While 1/100 might grow to be a monster, it will bread 1000 that don't and compete with deer with good genetics.

    Oh, and this info did come from a wildlife management class, a couple of them actually, and a 400 level evolution and a 300 level genetics.
     
  11. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,711
    State:
    Independen
    Well then if you're hunting in a controlled environment, maybe it will help. But in the real world, how are you going to control your neighbors deer, or his neighbors? Use "your" buck tags for the spikes, mine will be saved for my trophy.

    The spikes aren't controlling the population, the does are. If you've got big bucks in your area, they will keep the spikes from breeding. A doe on the ground does a lot more for the genetics of the herd than removing spikes.
     
  12. Catter

    Catter New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    Osceola, Arkansas
    I just want to bring up an article that I read in "Hunt Club Digest" called "The Latest Research on Deer". It was a pretty good read but here are the points of it...

    1. study was done at texas A&M using DNA to create a family tree for the herd that was studied.

    2. 3 areras were studied, Ok, Tx, and Miss. both managed land and public land.

    3. yearlings and 2.5 year old bucks accounted for 1/3 or more of all fawns produced in all 3 areas. even on the King ranch where 50% of the bucks were 4.56 years old or older the ratio was the same.

    4. the average buck accounted for about 3 fawns that survived each year.

    5. 25% of twin fawns were found to have had multiple sires.

    "The fact that white-tailed deer breed entirely different from elk influenced the results of Youngs study. A white-tailed buck has to search, find, stay with and possibly breed a doe over about a 2-day preiod from start to finish."

    "Shooting cull bucks has no statistical chance of making a difference in the quality of your deer herd......many times malformed antlers have nothing at all to do with genetics."

    "After six years of ground hunters and shooters from helicopters absolutly removing every low-quality buck that could be located, the average-age-class buck on the study area was actually smaller than the surrounding control areas."

    "The availability of food, the health of the herd, the size of the herd and many other factors, besides strictly genitics , play roles in antler developement"

    Thats just some of the points that were found in the study that i thought yall might be interested in.


    Joe
     
  13. TIM HAGAN

    TIM HAGAN New Member

    Messages:
    1,236
    State:
    Walkersvil
    Well I had seen first hand on the farm here a doe with two young that was dropped in may by sept one had about 4" spikes. We know it was the same buck he had a white patch on his left side. The next year one of my buddies shot him at 10 points scored just around 120. So I feel that if they have the right food to eat some of them spikes that people think will never be more than a spike may just be your next 8 or 10 the next season. But if your out for meat then shoot.