2nd level on pontoon boat question

Discussion in 'Boat Modification Journal' started by outdoors1988, Oct 4, 2009.

  1. outdoors1988

    outdoors1988 New Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Oklahoma
    What kind of material should i use for a second deck on my pontoon boat. It is going to be 10 to 12 foot long and i want it strong enough to store stuff and people to get on. So what should the main frame be made of for the upright suports.
     
  2. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    You'll wind up too top heavy for a toon.
     

  3. moriver

    moriver New Member

    Messages:
    416
    State:
    Missouri
    Josh

    To answer your question I dont know but be carefull Bro. Now yes lots of pontoons can be ordered with the second level. As Mark says your going to add a bunch of weight if you dont have it spot on. I am not so sure if it was me I would try to find the same boat with that level added on and size it up. I might even try to just buy the factory kit for it if possible. If you check into it and find that your boat was not available with the second level their is a reason why. Pontoons are cool, had one myself.
     
  4. outdoors1988

    outdoors1988 New Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I might have confused some people my pontoon boat is 24' and only want a 10 to 12 foot upper deck then do you guys think it will be too heavy?
     
  5. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Anything home built just about always winds up overbuilt for several reasons.
    Lack of knowledge about materials, working with those materials, and tools to work with them.
    This includes building boats.
    I've built boats. If I were to build from my own plans I would over build simply because I don't know the engineering numbers enough to safely design by them in terms of being lightweight. Designing a floor in a boat I can handle. Designing seating and a center console, yes I can design it light and build it light.

    You see it all the time right here in this sub forum with people replacing floors in boats. The thought seems to be that homes have 3/4" sub flooring therefor boats must too.
    It comes from lack of knowledge. Applying live load in a home floor system to a boat. (we don't have baby grand pianos, cocktail parties, and waterbeds on our boats)
    It comes from lack of knowledge of available materials and how to use them.
    And of course you can't forget money.
    Ever heard the addage that money buys speed?
    In the boating world money buys light. Whether it's aircraft aluminum or Okoume marine plywood. It's expensive. The lighter you build the more expensive it is. Case in point. I work with a man that in all likely hood has set a world record for a light boat. He designed and built a 10 foot rowing dinghy that weighs 13 pounds. It's all vacuum bagged carbon fiber. Mucho money. He probally has around 4 grand in a dinghy.

    The engineering aspect is one that has never enamored me. I absolutely hate calculations and getting into tensile, sheer, and lateral strengths. That stuff makes my head hurt.
    I leave all that to the designers and designer/engineers.

    Give me a set of engineered drawings any day.

    If a kit for that add on is available I would buy it. It's highly doubtful you'll save any money doing it yourself and you'll probally wind up with a better product and end result.
    I still wouldn't care to be that top heavy. It's just making a toon alot easier to go keel up. A toon don't weigh nothing to begin with.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2009
  6. Moose1

    Moose1 New Member

    Messages:
    574
    State:
    STEUB, OHIO
    ONE THING TO KEEP INMIND IS ANY CHANGES YOU MAKE WILL CHANGE THE AMOUNT OF PEOPLE AND GEAR ALOUD.IF STOPPED AND CHECKED BY LAKE PATROL ,U MIGHT GET FINED.
    COMTACT THE MANUFACTOR AND SEE WHAT THEY TELL YOU ABOT THOSE KIND OF CHANGES.

    JUST A TOUGHT.
     
  7. playin4funami

    playin4funami New Member

    Messages:
    4,104
    State:
    Saronville Ne.
    (we don't have baby grand pianos, cocktail parties, and waterbeds on our boats)Quote

    speak for yourself! j/k

    I don't think you would want much weight up there,it would definatly decrease the boats stability. that being said,if it were me I would use a 1 1/2 inch square tubing three uprights per side with some cross bracing or x type bracing on both sides,you will also need some bracing on the front and back. I would cover the top in vinyl decking,strong and light,and UV protected. Stainless steel bolts and tubing are going to be costly for the frame.
    while anchored up playing I would let kids climp up and jump off where safe,but I wouldn't store stuff up there or have anyone ride up top when underway. As far as storage with a 24 ft. pontoon you should have plenty of room on the main floor for everything,just might have to build some locker benches or something.Also if you trailer it,what height are you going to be after loaded on a trailer,you might need to make the top deck so it can be lowered.
    Anything can be accomplished with some redneck ingenuity,some friends,and a couple cases of beer.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2009
  8. catwhisper

    catwhisper New Member

    Messages:
    456
    State:
    georgia
    i own a pontoon and have thought of putting a upper deck on it also. i.ve been in metal fab for over 20 yrs and Don's ideas seem sound. i would use aluminum tubing 1 1/2 for frame all welded (that is the expensive part)and my toon has 5/8 marine plywood floor and is very solid. no more than 2 ft on center for frame.
     
  9. Koon

    Koon New Member

    Messages:
    167
    State:
    Oklahoma
    how old is the boat, what size are the logs... i've upgraded my logs from 17.5 footers and 18" diameters to 20' x 25" dia and doubled my floatation... best money spent so far on the old hag of a pontoon.