257 Weatherby

Discussion in 'Guns - Blackpowder' started by Grizdog, Oct 13, 2007.

  1. Grizdog

    Grizdog New Member

    Messages:
    36
    State:
    SC
    Anybody have a 257 WBY? What does it do to a deer......hole size, ect???
     
  2. xringer3

    xringer3 New Member

    Messages:
    950
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I'm wondering myself, been thinking about one. I love the 25-06, works great! Can't see were you can improve much on it without bullets falling apart.
     

  3. Zing

    Zing Member

    Messages:
    327
    State:
    Tennessee
    It should be the same as the 25-06, depending on the bullet type your using. I load solid bullets, nosler partion, barns bullets. Small hole in small hole out. drops them in there tracks everytime with a high shoulder shot. If your using soft tip or ballistic tips the hole would be larger.
     
  4. xringer3

    xringer3 New Member

    Messages:
    950
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Thanks Richard, I knew that the powder capacity wasn't that much different than the 25-06, but there was only a little different difference in velocity.
     
  5. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy New Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    State:
    Virginia
    I have a German made weatherby 257 mag I inherited when I was 18 years old from a friend of the family. I have shot lots of deer with that rifle and only remember one running off, (Operator Error). The rest fell dead in their tracks or ran less than 40 yards.

    I load my own shells. The shells I still shoot today are my handloads from 30 years ago. I always loaded 117 grain bullets because at the time I thought bigger was better. In reality I have since read in many many different articles that this caliber is at its most accurate with smaller bullets like the 87 grain or 100 grain. Whatever, I hunt in the woods and if my groups are 1.5 at 100 yards, does the deer care?:wink:
     
  6. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    I also own a German 257 and have shot lots of big game with it.I used to use 100gr bullets for the most part but then switched to 120 Siroccos.Have yet to lose a head of game but I only take good shots.You can take elk with the 120s if you are careful.:big_smile:I used the 300 W all over the world and now shoot a 7mm by choice although it is a 7mm RUM.
     
  7. chambers bd

    chambers bd New Member

    Messages:
    1,134
    State:
    Sautee,Geo
    Hi Folks;
    I have a weatherby 300 mag and it is very accurate. Sub moa with 3 rounds at 100 yards. A 257 weatherby mag should be outstanding. I would recommend having it free floated and bedded. I also had a gentry muzzle brake and the trigger adjusted to 3.2 pounds.
    I know of no company that backs their goods like weatherby. You will enjoy this rifle.:big_smile:
     
  8. Coyote1

    Coyote1 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Missouri
    Dear New Brother Rich;
    A .257 Weatherby with all things equal will not do anything that can't be done with a .25-06! In fact, if your worried about the extra 100 to 150 or so FPS that all the reloading books show, and all those goofy gun writer write about then you've lost "it" already! My personal .25-06 with a 100 gr Ballistic Tip Clocks out faster than the same load shown in the books for the .257 Weatherby!! :crazy: Let me tell you the secret of downing a Deer every time. It's BULLET PLACEMENT! I am fond of saying that I would much rather put the right bullet out of a .243 into the right place on a bear than I would to gut shoot him with a .460 Weatherby! If you want more details send me a PM and I will gladly answer your questions as soon as I finish chambering a customers custom rifle this evening. I will have some free time after that for your questions.
    Oh, one other thing, WELCOME TO THE BOC!!!:big_smile:
    That is WHY your getting off easy on getting your questions answered. I usually don't have the time to answer everyone's but I make it a point to get you headed in the right direction to the best of my abilities and 40+ years of experience will let me. :wink::big_smile:
    Fraternally and Cordially,
    Coyote1
    [[[[[End of Msg]]]]]
     
  9. chambers bd

    chambers bd New Member

    Messages:
    1,134
    State:
    Sautee,Geo
    chris hawkins on the 257 weatherby mag


    The .257 Weatherby Magnum
    By Chuck Hawks


    The .257 Magnum is one of the early Weatherby calibers, designed in 1944. It is one of the most popular Weatherby calibers, combining very high velocity, flat trajectory, and tolerable recoil. It is reputed to have been Roy Weatherby's favorite cartridge.
    Weatherby offers several factory loads for the .257 Mag. The lightest bullet available is an 87 grain Hornady Spire Point Bullet at 3825 fps, which is the varmint and predator load for the caliber. For medium game such as deer and the smaller antelope species at long range there is a 100 grain Hornady Spire Point bullet at 3602 fps and a 115 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip bullet at 3400 fps. For woods and brush country hunters there is a 117 grain Hornady Round Nose bullet at 3402 fps. For larger or tougher game Weatherby offers a 115 grain Barnes X-Bullet spitzer at 3400 fps, and a 120 grain Nosler Partition spitzer bullet at 3305 fps.
    As usual with Weatherby Magnum cartridges, reloaders will have difficulty exceeding the velocities of Weatherby factory loaded ammunition, but the other advantages of reloading (tuned loads and economy, for instance) still apply.
    Here are some specifications of interest to reloaders: bullet diameter .257", maximum COL 3.17", maximum case length 2.549", MAP 53,500 cup.
    There is a good selection of bullets available in .25 caliber. These range from 60 to 120 grains, although it is hard to see much point to bullets lighter than 85 grains in a cartridge with the case capacity of the .257 Wby. For hunting CXP2 class game, bullets from 100 to 120 grains are called for.
    Weatherby rifles made in Germany prior to 1972 usually have 1 turn in 12" rifling and will not stabilize most bullets over 100 grains. Later Weatherby .257 rifles have 1-10" rifling and are fine with the long 120 grain bullets.
    Slow burning rifle powders are generally recommended for the .257 Wby. Examples of suitable powders include AA-3100, H870, H4831, IMR 4831, IMR 7828, RL-22 and RL-25. RL-25 and IMR 7828 are favored for the heavier 115-120 grain bullets.
    The Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading, Sixth Edition shows that their 100 grain Spire Point bullet can be driven at a MV of 3000 fps by 67.2 grains of RL-25 powder, and lists a maximum load using 75.0 grains of RL-25 powder with the same bullet that achieves a MV of 3500 fps. Weatherby brass and Federal 215 primers were used for these loads, which were tested in a Weatherby rifle with a 26" barrel.
    The fifth edition of the Noser Reloading Guide shows that behind their 115 grain bullets 65.0 grains of IMR 7828 gives a MV of 3237 fps. The top load listed for their 115 grain bullets gives a MV of 3433 fps with 69.0 grains of IMR 7828 powder.
    For the 120 grain Nosler Partition bullet the starting load is 65.0 grains of IMR 7828 for a MV of 3206 fps, and the top MV is 3402 fps in front of a maximum load of 69.0 grains of IMR 7828. Weatherby brass and Federal 215 primers were used for all of these Nosler loads, which were tested in a 26" barrel.
    For my Weatherby Mark V rifle I load 69.4 grains of RL-25 behind a 120 grain Hornady HP InterLock bullet for a MV of 3200 fps, using Weatherby cases and CCI 250 primers. I find this load to be accurate and relatively easy on the barrel.
    Note: A full length article about the .257 Wby. Mag. can be found on the Rifle Cartridge Page.
     
  10. shaleetoo

    shaleetoo New Member

    Messages:
    15
    State:
    w v
  11. riddleofsteel

    riddleofsteel New Member

    Messages:
    353
    State:
    NC
    My 25-06 Remington Sendero is a fast rifle. Meaning for some reason its 26 inch barrel will safely digest enough H4831SC to push my 117 grain Hornadys ALMOST as fast as the published .257 Weatherby velocities. Performance on deer is stellar. I really don't see what a few more FPS could do for the average deer hunter. My 25-06 rifle will already kill them clean to ranges futher than an ethical hunter has any business shooting at a game animal anyway.
    Still it was Roy Weatherby's fav caliber and he hunted with it all over the world. I often think one of my retirement rifles my be a Ultralight Arms bolt action in .257 Weatherby. Great performance and a lot lighter load for these old bones to pack over hill and dale. I may give my Sendero to my son by then.
    :wink:
     
  12. seokfisherman

    seokfisherman Member

    Messages:
    442
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I purchased a .257 Weatherby mainly because of the ballistics and the fact that no one I knew owned one. With handloads the rifle shoots almost as good as my bull barrelled .223. Factory loads and brass are not cheap. I have pretty much retired my 7 mag for deer hunting. The .257 performs flawlessy on our small deer. Friends that have witnessed the performance of the .257 plan to buy one. A hog I shot in the chest fell over like he was hit in the head by the Hammer of Thor. In reality, the .25-06 with handloads can be vicious and the brass is a lot cheaper to acquire.