20hp mercury outboard...what's it worth

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by JoshB, Jun 12, 2007.

  1. JoshB

    JoshB New Member

    Messages:
    74
    State:
    Ohio
    I have a 1978, 20hp, longshaft merc that is just collecting dust. I am thinking about selling it. Any idea what I should ask for it? On a sidenote... if I run it on 10hp limit lakes but don't run it wide open, make a wake, or otherwise act like an idiot... how likely is it that DNR will mess with me about it? Thanks yall

    Josh
     
  2. BAMA_CAT

    BAMA_CAT New Member

    Messages:
    474
    State:
    Boaz,ALABAMA
    I dont know but let me know when you set a price PLEASE!!!!!!!
     

  3. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I think if I were going to use a 20hp on a lake with a 10hp limit, I'd paint the cowling on it. Before I bought my 25hp 4-stroke, I gave thought to using the 55hp outboard off an old pontoon. Due to a 50hp law here in Arkansas, I was going to paint the cowling on it if I used it on my jonboat.
    Incidentally, Arkansas used to have a 10hp limit on its Fish & Game lakes, but pressure from bass fishermen caused them to eliminate it. Seems that when the bassers were having a tournament on the lake, someone would always get stuck on a stump and have to crank up the big motor to get off. That disqualified them from the tournament. When I bought my 15hp Mariner back in the late 80s, the law was still in effect, and I bought a set of 10hp decals and put them on the cowling. Regardless of what hp motor you have on your boat, you need to use a lot of common sense when running a boat on a lake full of stumps and submerged trees that have rotted off just below the surface of the water. It's a good place to sink a fiberglass boat.
     
  4. Kyle

    Kyle New Member

    Messages:
    347
    State:
    Kansas City - Olathe
    ..or spin a prop...not that I've ever done that one. ok only twice
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Yep. Keep your rpms low, and the prop will slip with no damage, as it's supposed to do; spin it hard & fast enough, and you'll burn out the rubber bushing. The only time I get my motor much above an idle in a stumpfield is when the boat starts climbing a stump. Hitting the gas and going on over the stump works much better than trying to back off. Just remember to cut the gas as the boat comes off the stump, to lessen the shock if the prop hits the stump.