1972 55HP Chrysler Outboard

Discussion in 'Boating' started by tntitans21399, Nov 21, 2007.

  1. tntitans21399

    tntitans21399 New Member

    Messages:
    82
    State:
    Tennessee
    I boat a old 16ft 1972 Terry Bass Boat last Jan. It has worked great for me, for being my first running boat. It gets me up to 21 (by myself) and it drops down a lot when I get one other person in it. And if their is more then 2 of us it goes the same as if it is just two, but that added on person from being by myself drops dramatically. Being a 55HP some people told me it should be able to push me around at about 30mph. The compression levels on the 2 cylinders are about 140 both. Could the lower unit be causing this? How fast should I be going with a 55HP? 20 mph is fine for me, but I just wish it wouldn't drop as much when someone else was in the boat. I have been thinking about upgrading to maybe a 85HP during this winter, but if it something with the lower unit then maybe if would be easier and cheaper just to replace that. Automotive engines I know things about, but outboards are new to me, so any advice of help would be great. What do y'all think?
     

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  2. RivrLivn

    RivrLivn Member

    Messages:
    194
    State:
    Missouri
    Chris,
    do you know what kind of rpm's your running?
    It sounds like you may just need to research what pitch prop is best for that engine at the desired rpm's.

    I'm no outboard expert, but I cant see where there could be "slipage" in the lower unit.
     

  3. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    There is no way to set back here on my computer and tell you what you should be getting and what you shouldn't be getting. The question is, are you satisfied with what your getting or not. The condition of the hull, total weight in the boat, and as mention, the prop will have a lot to determine your speed. Second point is those speedometers on boats are for approximation only. It may read 21 on your boat, 28 on another. Third point, is unless your Jeff Gordon or some such similar person, whats speed got to do with an enjoyable day on the water?
     
  4. e'villeman

    e'villeman New Member

    Messages:
    222
    State:
    Evansville, Indiana
    I got a 50hp evinrude and once she plains out she skips right along pretty good ~ not like a hydro -jet boat but i just need to get there in a reasonable amount of time ( no speed-o so cant realy tell how fast
     
  5. Pirate Jerry

    Pirate Jerry New Member

    Messages:
    613
    State:
    Yulee Florida
    I had a '68 or '69 55HP Chrysler on an 18 foot bowrider and it would run 22 to 25 mph. Problem is it was the worse motor I ever had, saw or read about. The thing tore up prop/drive shafts and bushings/bearings on a regular basis. Had to have it rebuilt 3 times (first 2 times the dealer paid) It was very hard to start and one time a fuel line ruptured and started a fire under the engine cowling. All this happened in less than 4 years.The third time it stranded me out in the Chesapeake Bay, while waiting for a tow back to shore, I got my toolbox out, unbolted that sucker and pryed it off the transom and into 80 foot or so of water.:0a37: Wife was really P.O.d. :0a6: But I got some satisfaction from it. Later pryed that wife off too. Felt even better....:roll_eyes:
     
  6. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC

    Going by the age of the boat and what was available for flotation back then I'd be willing to say atleast part of your problem would be a waterlogged hull.
    If it has floatation foam in it, it would be remarkable if the foam wasnt staurated unless its always been garaged kept through its life.

    FWmud on this site pulled 1000+ pounds of saturated flotation foam and water out of a 16 foot hull. I witnessed it.

    Todays flotation foams are much better.
    Back then in the 70's your foam could be the foam used in flower arrangements.
    Dont laugh! Keith's boat had alot of that stuff in it from the factory! Name brand boat too.
    They might as well have stuffed it with dry sponges.

    Anyway, waterlogging is an area in which to explore.
    If you know where a truck scale is have the whole thing weighed on the trailer.
     
  7. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    I pulled 850 lbs of that water soaked stuff out of a 16 footer 1974 model about 5 days ago. You could spit on the floor and it would dissappear in a second and later find it under the floor.
     
  8. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    dang 1000 lbs, 800lbs, how do you get it out w/o tearing up the whole hull? or is that not possible?
     
  9. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    You pull the entire 300 pound floor out too:big_smile:
     
  10. Dadoftwo

    Dadoftwo New Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Oklahoma City
    unless your Jeff Gordon or some such similar person, whats speed got to do with an enjoyable day on the water?

    I once had a Triton with a 250 Optimax and learned that speed is not always a plus. Go with what you enjoy and feel comfortable with.
     
  11. Dadoftwo

    Dadoftwo New Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Oklahoma City
    That was Awshucks quote and I guess I did not copy and paste correctly to show. Not trying to steal any advice from others.
     
  12. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    If a hull is waterlogged there would be several reasons not to just be satisfied with a slower speed and watching the scenery.

    One would be hull integrity and another would be stability.
    If you have a saturated hull there is more under that floor then the bottom of the boat.
    There are stringers. Stringers are the backbone of the hull. They'll rot out in a New York minute. Just about guarantee the stringers were chopper glassed in place which does nothing to prevent rotting. Probally no more then a 1x6 to start with.
    Fiberglass will also deteriorate from prolonged water submersion.
    Its known as wicking. Water gains entry into the glass at one small place and then wicks thoughout the hull via the thousands of strands of glass.

    This is something marine surveyors focus on.
     
  13. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    When you shop for a used boat treat it as a house you are looking to buy.
    You want a boat that by all appearances has been well maintained, preferably garage kept.
    Thats going to say a whole lot about the overall condition of the boat.
    Do alot of digging around.
    If you get past all the preliminaries then pay someone to check the motor out and take a test ride.

    Any fiberglass boat 10 years old or older I'm going to pick through like no tomorrow.
    If its not been garaged kept there is a 95% chance I'll pass on it unless its the motor, hardware, and trailer I'm aiming to buy.
    Understanding how these boats are built and how the floor and transom are installed helps a whole lot.

    If its not been garage kept chances are real high its had alot of water and leaves in it. Leaves and other tree gunk stop up the bilge drain and the boat collects rainwater. Bill might be out raking leaves one day and notice it and either unstop the hole, still dont cover the boat or maybe Bill is preoccupied and intends to take care of it later and forgets.

    The next thing you know you got a wicked out hull, a rotten transom, spongy floor thats gained a couple hundred pounds, rotten stringers, and foam with enough water in it to fill a swimming pool. The floor in these boats are dropped in floors. They aren't fit floors and they aren't water proof.
    Water seeps through and around the floor seams and edges and winds up where it winds up puddling.
    It will find places to puddle even with a clear bilge drain.

    I'm as guilty as Bill. I've done the same thing Bill has and paid for it. In the process of paying I did learn a few things.

    Replacing the floor is a job but doable with average skills.
    Replacing stringers is a nasty job and requires more skill.
    Replacing a transom, you better know what you are doing. The stresses placed on a transom from an outboard engine are enormous.
    Imagine wrapping your arms around that engine and holding it while somebody else gives her all shes got and puts the boat through the paces.

    Dont be lured by price. Shop in your ballpark range and when the boat checks out get down to brass tacks with the price.

    Hull repairs are expensive and quite honestly not worth it in many cases doing it yourself considering the value of the boat.

    I can drop a 1000 dollars and alot time in replacing the floor in a bass boat quicker then you cry uncle but in all fairness I'm not one to build a garage out of scavenged lumber either.

    Even replacing a transom with Seacast you can drop 600 dollars real quick doing it yourself.

    Replacing foam in a bass boat you can figure atleast 300 dollars on the skinny side.

    Then you have carpet and adhesive or whatever you choose to cover the floor with.

    As you can see, if you dont shop carefully, you could wind up spending more on repairs then what you paid for the rig and every dime of that will be more then what its worth.

    I had a good friend that had a 24 footer for sale. It was an ocean boat.
    By all appearances it was in immaculate shape and not that old.
    He told me the transom was completely shot.

    Looking at it you wouldnt ever know. He could have really stuck somebody on that sale but thats not his style. He had 3 estimates for the transom repair. All 3 were over 3000 dollars.

    A car you can crawl up under, stick your head up under the hood, jump in it for a spin around the block and get a good idea about what your buying.

    A boat is totally different. There is alot of places you cant see unless you dismantle it. Thats why the history of how well its been taken care of holds alot of weight in the decision to buy or walk away.